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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was checking the "Joke a Day" thread and posted a pic about Pharos then thought of checking how was woodworking by then and this is what I found.

Hope you find it interesting how they did these stuff without routers, sanders, etc.

Many ancient Egyptian drawings going back to 2000 B.C. depict wood furniture, such as beds, chairs, stools, tables, beds, and chests. There’s also physical evidence of these wooden objects, as many were found well-preserved in tombs due to the country’s dry climate. Even some sarcophagi (coffins) found in the tombs were crafted from wood.

Ancient Egyptian woodworkers were noted for regularly practicing their craft and for developing techniques that advanced the craft for future generations. For instance, they invented the art of veneering, which is the practice of gluing thin slices of wood together.

The earliest examples of veneering are over 5,000 years old, found in the tomb of Semerkhet. Many of the pharaohs were buried with objects that had African ebony veneer and ivory inlays.

According to some scholars, Egyptians were the first to varnish, or “finish” their woodwork, though no one knows the composition of these “finishes”. Finishing is the art of placing some kind of protective sealant on wood materials in order to preserve them.

Ancient Egyptian woodworkers used a variety of tools, including axes, adzes, chisels, pull saws, and bow drills. During the earliest pre-dynastic period (circa 3100 B.C., about the time of the first pharaoh), they also used mortise and tenon joints to join pieces of wood. Pegs, dowels, and leather or cord lashings strengthened these joints. Animal glue was used during the New Kingdom period (1570 – 1069 B.C.).

Egyptologists found the world’s oldest piece of plywood in a third dynasty coffin. It was made of six layers of wood four millimeters thick held together by wooden pegs.

The Egyptians used a variety of wood to build their furniture and other objects. The wood came from native acacias, local sycamore and tamarisk trees. However, when deforestation occurred in the Nile Valley starting from the Second Dynasty, they began importing cedar, Aleppo pine, boxwood, and oak from various parts of the Middle East. They also imported ebony from Egyptian colonies and used it to construct items that went into tombs such as inlaid wooden chests.

Source: A History of Woodworking & Civilization
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here are some of their work
 

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thanks Ahmed...
but what are we looking at in the 3rd picture down...
that link is quite the read...
thanks again...

WTB... there are members here from almost every one of those eras...
 

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thanks Ahmed...
but what are we looking at in the 3rd picture down...
that link is quite the read...
thanks again...

WTB... there are members here from almost every one of those eras...
Wasn't that a picture of your first design when you got promoted to the position of Pharaoh's first Master Carpenter...? You remember don't you...just before the big river disaster...? Way after the Big Flood where you taught that guy Noah what a cubit was... :dance3:
 
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Huh????
bad hearing...
and the Big Bang concussion addled the memory...
didn't Alice bring you up to speed???
 
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Thanks, Ahmed. Very interesting story and pictures. I would welcome more of this. Please.
 
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I thought that looked like Stick in the first set of pics.

HJ
 
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@Ahmed Affara Wow, what an interesting post. All those cutting tools were made of copper or bronze and probably held a sharp edge for 3 or 4 minutes at a time. Slow work indeed. I guess there are just so many ways to join wood. The glues they had were pretty iffy compared to wood glues and their molecular bond today.
 

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Really impressive craftsmanship, even with today's tools. That statuette, the one with the golden background, is a keeper!
 

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True craftsmanship at work here! Thanks, Ahmed. A great history lesson.

These photos just go to show that there is nothing new under the sun when it comes to joinery and technique. The only thing that changes are the quality of the tools and the materials.

I didn't recognize you in the pictographs, Stick, but isn't that a couple of your kids in the second picture?
 
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Thanks Ahmed. That was very interesting.
 
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Most interesting information Ahmed, thank you for that.

I remember seeing the King Tut exhibit when it came through Seattle many years ago. Looking at their craftsmanship close up made it doubly impressive when you consider that all the items were made thousands of years ago.

One thing I didn't realize was that they had pull saws way back then. I'm going to have to check and see how far back the Japanese woodworkers used similar saws.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Am I the only guy to see a mans head in the chair back?( About the 8th pic from the start.)I don't think it's a reflection,maybe a faded painting ? James
Common @jj777746, it is the reflection of the person taking the pic on the glass, you can see the frames' reflection as well.

I'm from Alexandria, but I will see, maybe during the next vacation when I go to Egypt, I'll go to the Egyptian museum in Cairo and take some pictures myself for the wooden treasures to share them with you guys.

Unfortunately all the pics I have from last time are for mummies of some interesting kings.

Imagine, these pieces of wood worth millions now :sarcastic:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Yeah it was, we have a new one now, it was a great impact in the Judaism and Christianity as well.
 
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