Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to make sure I use terms correctly. I understand that if I take two boards and nail them together at a right angle it's 'butt joint'. But if I add a couple of dowels is it still a 'butt joint' or is it a 'doweled joint' or a 'doweled butt joint' or ????

And is there an authoritative source for such information?

Thanks for reading.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
A butt joint is also two square ended boards joined end to end.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
No dictionary needed for that one. I think that is close to universal. In French it's merde, German is scheisse, but the tones and inflections are identical so no translation is normally required.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,239 Posts
One of my favorite woodworking books is The Joint Book by Terrie Noll. Available in the spiral bound version for about $8 on Amazon. Link below. Very clear illustrations and not a lot of writing tell you exactly how to produce virtually every type joint there is. It is printed on heavy, coated paper stock in full color. Really cool! Here's the promo copy:

"This hardcover book with internal spiral binding is 6.5in x 8in, a perfect size for carpenters and woodworkers to keep near their workbench or toolbox for quick access.The design of this book allows it to lay open flat, which allows for easy and frequent reference, and the interior photographs, illustrations and diagrams, make the learning process simple and fun for beginners, and provides useful tips for more advanced readers."

"The Joint Book contains easy-to-follow step-by-step instructions for creating edge and scarf joints, lapped and housed joints, mortise and tenon joints, miters and bevels, dovetails, dowels and biscuits, and provides detailed descriptions of fasteners, hardware, and knockdown joints. This book is the perfect companion for any woodworker interested in improving their joint-making skills."

https://www.amazon.com/Joint-Book-C...qid=1497580967&sr=8-1&keywords=the+joint+book
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,239 Posts
@sunnybob It's a book that lights up joints, and it really smokes its competition. The paper is too thick to roll anything in and stays flat. Some of the joints lead to confusion, so you'll find yourself slowing down a bit when doing them. Probably not a good idea to drive while inhaling the content of this primo book. Some things you can get on Amazon, some you can't.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,239 Posts
Between the wood filler and now this book, I am 1/2 way to an Amazon order! hahaha
That happens to me from time to time as well. Make sure you store the wood filler in a tightly sealed container, then put that into a plastic storage bag with air squeezed out.

I'm waiting for delivery on a Wixey digital gadget for my DeWalt 735, which purchase was also inspired by a post. The good news is that I was able to get my fave flavored peach syrup cheap as an add on when purchasing something else. :laugh2:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,239 Posts
@DaninVan I keep a variety of flavored syrups around to add a bit of flavor to my tea. Coffee and I don't get along. We have a local restaurant supply store that keeps a variety of flavors, peach being my favorite. Radiation and chemo messed up my "taste buds" so it takes pretty strong flavors to get through. My wife loves some of these with her coffee, in particular, the sugar free chocolate, sugar free Irish cream and the hazelnut. Try it, you may like it.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
6,938 Posts
One of my favorite woodworking books is The Joint Book by Terrie Noll. Available in the spiral bound version for about $8 on Amazon. QUOTE]

I searched for books on-line for a number of years, mostly out-of-print, and limited editions. Best way to find a book is google the title and author. Used, good condition, the book is available for half what it is on Amazon. I very, very, seldom bought new - because I could go to Barnes & Noble, find a book I wanted, usually around $35, so would then trek to the used bookstore I frequented, and very often find the same book, in new condition, for $10, or less, usually a bit less. Mostly I liked woodworking and boat building books from around the 1900 to 1950 period. Apparently people were a lot smarter then, because you could get complete boat plans in maybe five pages, and today the same build would take an entire book. I love old books, and I've got a few that are selling now for $2-300 and up, books I usually paid less then $10 each. Times are changin'.

https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/the-e...-ORpsaAo048P8HAQ#isbn=1558704493&idiq=2248899
 
  • Like
Reactions: 197761

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Yeah, I got books and video games by searching used and checking their reputations and such. I forgot about the used book stores! DOH! I will have to take a run this next week and have a look around; I think there are 3 in town. The 2nd hand shops usually have crap for books...DING!!! I bought 2 "look-a-like book" storage boxes for the smaller bathroom items years ago that I still use...just thought of this! If the crappy books are big enough, I could make decorative storage boxes out of them! Or, I could use the hard covers and make wood boxes and cover them with the binding! See? Told you, you guys are making my wheels turn!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,239 Posts
Nice idea, You could cut the backs off and glue them to a wood base, then use that to make the lid. You'd have to find books about the same height, but it would be interesting and unique.

Our local library volunteer group sells buncles of books pick your own, by the bag full. Cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
I have a friend who practically lives at the library so I will ask her if they are doing the bag full of books and when. I know it used to be used library books were only sold at certain times...but this is worth checking into.

I forgot, I didn't put my b-day up. LOL But watch out, I am trying to catch up to you guys! LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
One of my favorite woodworking books is The Joint Book by Terrie Noll. Available in the spiral bound version for about $8 on Amazon. Link below. Very clear illustrations and not a lot of writing tell you exactly how to produce virtually every type joint there is. It is printed on heavy, coated paper stock in full color. Really cool! Here's the promo copy:

"This hardcover book with internal spiral binding is a perfect size for carpenters and woodworkers to keep near their workbench or toolbox for quick access.The design of this book allows it to lay open flat, which allows for easy and frequent reference, and the interior photographs, illustrations and diagrams, make the learning process simple and fun for beginners, and provides useful tips for more advanced readers."

"The Joint Book contains easy-to-follow step-by-step instructions for creating edge and scarf joints, lapped and housed joints, mortise and tenon joints, miters and bevels, dovetails, dowels and biscuits, and provides detailed descriptions of fasteners, hardware, and knockdown joints. This book is the perfect companion for any woodworker interested in improving their joint-making skills."

https://www.amazon.com/Joint-Book-C...qid=1497580967&sr=8-1&keywords=the+joint+book

I think "The Joint Book" posted by @DesertRatTom is about as good as you are going to find in recent publications. At slightly less than $11 from Amazon I think it's a good deal that nearly every woodworker should have. Ibt has pictures of each joint, so you not only get a good description, but a good photo or two of the joint. There are joints in there that I would love to try some day, if I can find a good useful application for it. The book is a good education and reference for all of us involved in or just learning woodworking. I bought my copy about 10 years ago, shortly after it first became available (paid less back then, of course) and I still refer to it often.

Charley
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top