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Discussion Starter #1
This is my workbench that I made using MDF and plywood using plans from a workbench book, modified to suit my ideas at the time. It also reflects some mistakes that have taught me a lot. Since then I moved the vice, added a shallow drawer where the vice was for guide strips used by the Incra Twin-Linear.

The top has three layers of 3/4 MDF glued together with top and side sheating in 1/4 Birch ply. The dog holes were a terrible mistake, spacing was impossible to put in accurately spaced. The black plate is a router mount. Your eyes aren't wrong, I put it in at right angles to what I should have. Just visible in the lower left of the fourth picture is the router power switch with its yellow panic bail.

Legs and frame members are laminated 3/4 ply with veneer to cover the ply edges. These are lag bolted into the table top and stiffened by the carcase. The carcase was supposed to hold drawers that haven't been built. It has proven helpful in providing storage.

When I do it over there are several improvements I have in mind, but for now, flawed as it is, it has been very useful and I'm glad I made it.
 

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Nice bench, Microsuffer. I have been agonizing over finding the right style for at least a year now and still haven't decided yet.
 

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Great looking bench and well thought out.

Looking great. :)

John
 

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On your next bench use a sheet of pegboard for hole locations. This will give you a nice grid for placement of the pilot holes and guarantees alignment. My first table had a Rousseau plate too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all the compliments. I'll keep the peg board trick in mind, though I think if I do it again I'll restrain the impulse to do such a large grid.

Having built and used this one for a while, I think than anyone who has hesitated to build a bench should do it and learn. It is only after trying to do various things that I now appreciate the limitations of what I have and better understand what I want and need.

Charlie H.
 

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Charlie,
In the Oct. issue of Wood magazine under Shop Tips. A guy used T-tracks aligned with the dogs on the vices instead of dog holes. Looks like a neat solution that would hold all sorts of odd shapes and angles.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I like the idea of using T-tracks and plan to use them in my next bench. The flexibility is much greater and such were not readily available when the book I started from was written. Routing a straight slot is certainly a lot easier than trying to lay out a bop the gopher array.
 

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The workbench looks like one of those projects that, in spite of any missteps or possible improvements, will prove useful, or even indispensible, for decades.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for noticing.

I like the comment about 'Bop The Gopher'. Why I didn't think about the T-Trak before starting I don't know, but definitely I am going that way if I ever get around to building another top. Having the router plate oriented as it is has shown itself to be a bit of a mistake.

Even with its flaws, the design has served me well and is like an anvil for being rock solid and not flexing. Like any such venture, building and using it has been an education. I strongly recommend a new woodworker build his own bench for that reason.
 
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