Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 53 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Dust, dust, go away! Then organize the shop.
Sawdust has a way of getting over and under everything. So I got busy making changes in the shop. Here are some pictures and more about what I've done in the hope it will inspire others. Nothing fancy, but practical and doable. Nearly all made from scrap.

Picture 1: This was once the short leg of an L shaped counter. It was always messy. So I removed the leg and used the 6 foot section to make 5 counters. 3 on top are about 7 inches wide, the bottom are 12 inches. As you can see, it holds a lot of stuff. After using it, I realized that the 1x4s that hold the self brackets let things fall through, so I used some thin ply to put stops at the back of the shelves. That lets power cords snake under and through the shelving. I have a couple of remote controlled lights I can turn on from the house.

Picture 2: On the opposite wall, I have some wire shelving with all the tools, accessories and such smaller stuff in standard plastic containers. Printed what's in the boxes on the end. No dust gets in, and the wire shelving lets most sawdust pass through down to the floor. That 18 inch space underneath makes it easy to vacuum out the dust with my DC unit.

Picture 3: The big dust offender is the sliding miter saw. Shoots sawdust all over the place! There doesn't seem to be any way to tame this beast entirely, but by setting up a 72 inch wide shower curtain liner behind and to about 18 inches out from the wall, I already stopped much of the litter. Next I'm going to get another liner and put a piece across the top and hanging down just above the handle in the front. Finally, going to attach a short bib on the back of the stand to guide sawdust to the bottom, where I will tuck all the curtains into a dust collection port. Notice the doors on the stand. Part of the project was to seal in the saw stand and put doors on it. Sliding drawers go in next.

Picture 4: Close up of the way I set up the curtain rods, attaching brackets to the studs. I used 3 1/4x20 nuts as spacers to allow room for the curtain hangers. They slide, but really don't need to. Notice the brackets are upside down. These brackets were outside for a couple of years, so a little rusty, but still solid. My plan is to gather all the plastic into a box attached to the wall with a dust port sucking in as much air as possible. I think to do this right, I'll have to buy another shower curtain liner, part for covering the top, and another part for a "bib" attached to the back of the stand.

You may notice the white foam behind the saw and one of the shelves? They block and insulate the cheap single pane windows that pass in heat during the summer and let in the cold in winter. This makes it very dark in there, especially when I block the two small skylights with foam. So I installed a number of under counter LED units and found some 1150 lumen LED reflector style bulbs to put over the table saw and workbench. Really lights the place up for a guy with old eyes. One light over the door has a timer switch. Push buttons for 1, 2, 4 and 8 hours on.

With all these changes, I was able to move my band saw out of a back corner to a much handier spot and find myself using it a lot more. Put some fold down casters on it so I can push a lever down and the thing rolls, lift the lever and the saw sits solid on the floor. There was some steel shelving where the band saw stands that cut into the space, so I gained maybe 12 sq feet in space, which really makes it nice to work in there. The shelves were grossly wasteful use of space. Notice the additional peg board space behind the band saw.

I hope this motivates some to take on organizing their shop. This is soooooo much nicer and stuff doesn't get lost so easily. Everything is close at hand and there's still a 12 foot long counter with even more storage for nuts, bolts and other small stuff.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,426 Posts
Looking good Tom . I'm on a mission to get mine organized too . I was looking at your drills and thinking you could use one of these . MT Stringer invented it :)




I keep all my air nails and screw driver bits in the slim drawers below . This is a pic before the fronts were added to the drawers




 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Wow, I am going to make one of these. Those tools would be more likely to be used when displayed that way. Thanks for sharing this, put a picture in my todo folder.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
BTW Rick, don't forget to put steel stud protection plates wherever those wires go through a stud. You don't want to run a drywall screw through the wiring. Unlikely to happen, but the plates will prevent it entirely. I didn't use a vapor barrier in my shop but put a layer of aluminized bubble wrap on the inside of the shed wall, then layered the insulation on top of that. Adds an additional R4, but it also tends to redirect infra red heat outward. Add another couple of hundred for a few rolls. With R13 in the walls, that extra little bit of insulation and IR reflection helps. Your AC and heater won't have to work so hard. Nice space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,568 Posts
Nice idea on the shower curtain. The flexibility solves the problem of a sliding saw needing so much clearance in the rear when making a regular hood. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,583 Posts
You have some great ideas. I am really limited in space including wall space. I was thinking of moving some things upstairs to the spare room that the wife uses to get ready for work each morning. She works :big_boss: to support my hobbies- hunting, fishing, woodworking, loafing in front of the TV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,478 Posts
Trying to organize my shop, building much needed storage but that's on hold for the moment as I work on dust collection. I bought a Dust-Right separator from Rockler, works so well that I'm making a larger one to hook up to the main DC. Also bought the Jet air cleaner and working on getting that mounted - no way to hang it from the ceiling (conduit in the way and no easy access to beef up the trusses) so I built a 2x4 frame so I could sit it on a shelf up at the ceiling. Eventually there will be cabinets inside the frame to take advantage of the space.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
687 Posts
Tom, I like the shower curtain idea for the miter saw. I was given a very old chop saw by a friend who was a carpenter in his younger day. It weighs about a ton and when I use it, I think the saw dust ends up in the next county. I recently saw a shop tip in a woodworking magazines. It uses a large round plastic trash can, probably in the 30 - 40 gallon range. With a utility knife cut out a vertical piece about 1/3 of the circumference and most of the height of the trash can. Cut a hole in the bottom for a 4" hose and put the top back on. Positioned just behind the saw it captures a lot of the saw dust and what slides to the bottom is removed by the dust collection hose. Since i can probably pick up a can at Walmart for around $15 I was thinking of trying it. If anyone's interested, I'll go through my magazines and see if I can find the picture and post it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,478 Posts
Issue #193 of Woodsmith magazine has a Miter Saw Dust Collector in the Tips& Techniques section - it's uses a 14" x 16" hood Tabletop Dust Fitting - Rockler Woodworking Tools attached to a piece of plywood which can then slide in a frame that stands behind the saw. The hood can then be moved as needed to stay behind the saw when mitering. Hooked up to a DC, and with the height of the hood adjusted to collect the bulk of the sawdust, it may be a worthwhile addition to your shop. It uses a 4" hose, but a 90° fitting off the hood outlet would minimize the space needed behind the collector.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,426 Posts
Issue #193 of Woodsmith magazine has a Miter Saw Dust Collector in the Tips& Techniques section - it's uses a 14" x 16" hood Tabletop Dust Fitting - Rockler Woodworking Tools attached to a piece of plywood which can then slide in a frame that stands behind the saw. The hood can then be moved as needed to stay behind the saw when mitering. Hooked up to a DC, and with the height of the hood adjusted to collect the bulk of the sawdust, it may be a worthwhile addition to your shop. It uses a 4" hose, but a 90° fitting off the hood outlet would minimize the space needed behind the collector.
I believe I bought that exact hood . I should try mounting behind my miter saw and see if it helps . It's gotta be my worst offender right now when it comes to dust .

Should I by pass the 1-1/2" dust collection tube that is on the Makita saw and just use the hood?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,478 Posts
I believe I bought that exact hood . I should try mounting behind my miter saw and see if it helps . It's gotta be my worst offender right now when it comes to dust .

Should I by pass the 1-1/2" dust collection tube that is on the Makita saw and just use the hood?
My old Craftsman radial arm saw had a similar hood (although smaller) attached to the table behind the blade. There was a smaller hose connected to the blade guard that was routed into the main collector and that fed quite a lot of the sawdust into the collector - wouldn't hurt to try it. Leave a little slack in the smaller hose to allow for pivoting and attach the hose to the hood with a tie-wrap so the sawdust is routed into the 4" opening, and maybe a light spring attached between the hose and the hood/frame to keep the hose up out of the work area.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Tom, I like the shower curtain idea for the miter saw. I was given a very old chop saw by a friend who was a carpenter in his younger day. It weighs about a ton and when I use it, I think the saw dust ends up in the next county. I recently saw a shop tip in a woodworking magazines. It uses a large round plastic trash can, probably in the 30 - 40 gallon range. With a utility knife cut out a vertical piece about 1/3 of the circumference and most of the height of the trash can. Cut a hole in the bottom for a 4" hose and put the top back on. Positioned just behind the saw it captures a lot of the saw dust and what slides to the bottom is removed by the dust collection hose. Since i can probably pick up a can at Walmart for around $15 I was thinking of trying it. If anyone's interested, I'll go through my magazines and see if I can find the picture and post it.
That's an excellent idea. I can test it out by placing a spare trash contrainer behind and slip the curtain into it. Maybe even tape it in place to start with. A little apron of curtain attached to the back of the stand and leading into the can would stop lots of sawdust from spreading toward the front. I'm also going to drape another section of curtain across the top and hanging down in front just above the saw's business end. That should direct most of the air flow inward. If I only get a 50% reduction, I'll be happy, but I believe the setup will give me a greater reduction than that. Will see shortly and post pictures of the final setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,369 Posts
I really like what you've done Tom! You can see that you've really thought things through.

Darn it though. Sharon saw those pictures and hopes I will re-organize my shop... I told here I would have a lot more room in mine if her commercial sunbed wasn't out there...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,323 Posts
I really like what you've done Tom! You can see that you've really thought things through.

Darn it though. Sharon saw those pictures and hopes I will re-organize my shop... I told here I would have a lot more room in mine if her commercial sunbed wasn't out there...
"...but doc, all I said to her was that she should move her commercial sunbed and that's when everything went dark!">:)>:)>:)
 
  • Like
Reactions: DaninVan

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
"...but doc, all I said to her was that she should move her commercial sunbed and that's when everything went dark!">:)>:)>:)
suspect there may be an envelope of time before the doc will let Mike join us...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,369 Posts
"...but doc, all I said to her was that she should move her commercial sunbed and that's when everything went dark!">:)>:)>:)
suspect there may be an envelope of time before the doc will let Mike join us...
LMOA!!! Actually it turned out well. She has not used it since she stood out at the power meter and had me turn it on. (I could hear her screaming outside to quickly turn it off.) She hasn't used it since she figured out how much power it draws.

She finally has told me that I can sell it on CL. How much is a 24 bulb Wolfe bed worth? I have no idea on those...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,323 Posts
LMOA!!! Actually it turned out well. She has not used it since she stood out at the power meter and had me turn it on. (I could hear her screaming outside to quickly turn it off.) She hasn't used it since she figured out how much power it draws.

She finally has told me that I can sell it on CL. How much is a 24 bulb Wolfe bed worth? I have no idea on those...
Whew! Are you lucky! :surprise:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,236 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I found a plastic box with a flat bottom, cut a hole and mounted a 4 inch dust port in the bottom, with a short length of flex tubing connecting it to a blast gate. My movable dust collector intake nozzle fits over the blast gate. I can see that my DC system does not really move as much air as it will take for this to work well, but tucking the curtain into the box and using metalic tape to secure it has already made a difference. Works a little better once I put a top sheet over the curtain, but I think it will be even better when I add both a well sealed top and a front curtain just above the saw head. Surprising how little sawdust gets out, despite the weak blower system. Guess I'm going to have to pony up for a stronger blower. I also think I have too many right angles in the exhaust line. I'll have to work on that.
 
1 - 20 of 53 Posts
Top