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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello fellows, I was browsing through a local Thrift store here in Bangor and found this. Paid $3 for it, so if it can't be fix'd up, no real loss. Can't see a brand name anywhere, only "Made in the USA" on the base plate (4th picture), under the blade and in front of the rear handle. Small crack in the rear of the back handle. I'm thinking I can put some glue in it and clamp it, or fill it, or just let it be. Thanks to fire65 for posting his reno's. I probably would have passed over this had I not seen his posts. Is there anyway to tell if it's worth rebuilding?

The (presumed) adjustment wheel is rusted to the bolt. It & the bolt turn freely, but don't seem to do anything. Does that mean the threads are stripped where it goes into the blade? This is the first time I've ever actually looked closely at a plane. This will be a learning process! Any input will be greatly appreciated.

I found this on you tube, looks like an exact match.

https://www.google.com/search?q=How+do+you+restore+a+vintage+hand+plane%3F&rlz=1C1CHBD_enUS779US779&oq=How+do+you+restore+a+vintage+hand+plane%3F&aqs=chrome..69i57j0.13381j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#kpvalbx=1
 

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Quenten, you bought it so you already had it in your mind to restore it, ((I think)). I would go ahead and try to restore it. Just go to your shop and relax and go to work.
 

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I would restore it and make a new tote..
or replace it...
repairs to totes seldom work out well
there's a zillion replacement parts for hand planes..
 

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I would definitely give it a go, nothing to lose and you will learn a lot in the process. Throw it in a gallon of vinegar and go from there. On cracks like that I usually just blow the dust out of them and fill them with super glue then sand and finish as usual.
 

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If the adjusting wheel stud is turning, then you will have a problem with that because its screwed into the cast iron body of the plane.

Do your best to save the wheel and stud though because they are not normal threads and although those parts can be found, they will cost you more than you paid for the plane.

Theres a strong demand for old Stanley planes. You could sell it on as is and make a profit.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/STANLEY-BA...978211?hash=item2aa3567323:g:VIUAAOSw3Z9aqr81
 

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Quentin:


"The (presumed) adjustment wheel is rusted to the bolt. It & the bolt turn freely, but don't seem to do anything. Does that mean the threads are stripped where it goes into the blade? "

The adjustment wheel doesn't thread into the iron (blade). If it did, the iron wouldn't be able to be adjusted. What adjusts the depth of cut (by moving the iron up and down) is the yoke that pivots as the wheel is turned, thereby moving the iron.
If the adjustment wheel is turning, but not doing anything, check to see if the blade is rusted to the frog, or see if the yoke (looks like a spur that sits over the adjustment wheel) is not frozen. The blade (iron) should move up or down as you turn the wheel.

I've read a lot about Stanley hand planes (I have several, including a couple of Baileys, as well as an old Millers Falls). If you want to do some reading, I suggest you check out this site: The Superior Works - Patrick's Blood & Gore: Preface

My Stanley's all have markings on them. The plane number (size) is behind the tote and the name, either Stanley, or Bailey, is in front of the knob and the lateral adjustment lever usually has "Stanley" stamped on it. I don't see any markings on the plane in your pictures, so I'm not sure it's a Stanley.

Since you only paid $3, you could spend some time restoring it - if nothing else, you will learn a lot about the process and the plane. You might get a decent user out of it if that is what you're looking for, but I don't believe that plane to be worth much (sorry @sunnybob).
 

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Like Vince said, if it was a Stanley it should be easy to read that on it. Most planes were modeled after the Stanleys and some were pretty good copies. Lee Valley and Lie Neilsen are still copies of Stanleys but they have applied better machining and improved on a few shortcomings.

DON'T try to adjust the blade again until you get the rust off. You might wind up stripping the threads. I think LV sells new totes (the rear handle) and they sell some new blades for them. You'll need to get the blade on it flat and smooth and also the contact area of the chip breaker. Some sheets of different grits of silicon carbide sandpaper would be one way to do it. Just lay the sheets on a bench and start rubbing rusty parts around on them. The vinegar trick might get you along a little faster and some loosening chemical on the adjuster wheel and just keep adding until it can be turned.
 
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I am going vinegar after watching Jay Bates restore video. A friend of mine insisted that I rinse right away as a reminder though. Though truthfully I have not started yet. I have everything in the shop including the PVC pipe though.
 

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yes..rinse immediately...
you could use 1:1 ratio ATF and acetone...
scrub w/ non-woven pad...
 
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Judging by the heavy casting of the body, thats a WWII era plane. Good chance it is a Stanley. The level cap may have been changed out at some point. The iron and chip breaker look to be pretty well pitted. If they are that bad, get replacements. You got good bones with that body, a couple buck and some time, you'll have a solid user for life.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Well, I didn't spend too much time on it after I realized the frogs threads were stripped. Combination of the bolt's threads worn too for down as well as the frogs. I did soak it in vinegar which worked pretty good. Don't have access to any tools up here so I just bought some 120 & 600 grit sandpaper at Walmart and went to work. Didn't worry about doing too much since it needs a replacement frog. It does look better than it did and I did learn how they work. I'll know what to look for next time. Anybody know of a spare frog somewhere?

Oh, and it's not a Stanley, when I got the rust off the blade I could see "FULTON WARRANTED" across the top. Nothing else on it but "MADE IN USA" in front of the tote. I will take it apart again and work on it some more to make it look better. Sand blast and paint. The wood needs more sanding and finishing. I'll keep it as a pretty cool piece of history! Thanks for the input guys.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
The wife and I went for a drive today. We passed a kitchen supply store & my wife says, "ohh, I want to go in there." So I turn around and pull in and as I'm parking, a gentleman comes out carrying some short boards. As we walk up to the door, I say to the guy, "looks like you are fixin to do some woodworking." He admits he is tinkering around as a hobby. My wife walks up to the door to go in and the guys says, "we are closed today." So after we talk for a few more minutes I ask him if there are any thrift stores around that would have any old hand planes. He says no, but tells me about a big store about 150 miles to the south. Then says, "you know, I've got a couple in the back that I never use if you want to look at them." I say sure and he goes and get them. I offered him $40 for the pair and he says sold. So I wound up with a couple of planes that should handle some wood in the future.

One is a Stanley Difiance No 1204 and the other is a Stanley No 5 1/4. Everything is in good shape on these except the blades. Some rust, but that's easy. You can tell he sharpened them on a bench grinder. The grind is convex and the right end of each one is a bit blue where he over heated them. Nothing a bit of care can't fix!

These bit/braces are in the store I got the 1st plane from. The near field one has never had paint on it. The second one appears to be galvanized and the third one has a silver colored coating that is peeling off. Couldn't discern any name brand on any of them. The ratcheting chucks have 2 jaws. I was going to google them, but without names...I didn't think I'd ever use them so I left them.
 

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That's a pretty good score. I still use the old style brace and bit on occasion. I got a couple of lots of bits on ebay, maybe 60 or 70 total bits. The bits are fairly easy to sharpen with an auger file or triangular file and when sharp they cut surprisingly fast. One handy feature, and the reason I use them, is the ratcheting feature on them that allows to drill up against a wall or in between studs.

When you are tuning the blades on the planes up remember to flatten the backs just like you would a chisel. You'll get a much sharper edge that way. I use silicon carbide sandpaper and just rub them back and forth on it. The finer the final grit the sharper you'll get the cutting edge. The chip breaker needs to be flat too where it contacts the blade so it may need sanding.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks Chuck, I looked them up on eBay. The Bailey sells for $20-$150 and the other other one $12-$40. Or that's what they are asking for anyway, so I'm satisfied with the price.

I haven't enough research on braces so I don't know if any of those are worth having. They appear to work just fine, just need to be cleaned up. I did look at a lot of pictures yesterday to try to identify the one in the forefront (thinking it's the oldest). The metal configuration on each side of the middle grip must be unusual, haven't seen anything that matches it. And they only have 2 jaws in the chuck.
 
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