Router Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok guys. I've been reading about all the different exotic routers you have, and getting more sheepish as I go along. I have a Skil 1836, 1 1/2 hp plunge router that I've been trying to learn on. Am I just beating my brains against the wall? Also, does anyone know of a guide bushing plate and bushings that I can use with it? And to further show my stupidity, is there such a thing as an adaptor to convert 1/4" to 1/2" router bits?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,921 Posts
Neil, we all had to learn so dont feel embarrassed. Your router will do most of the jobs the expensive ones will. I will be posting photos on how to make a plate for your router, or how to adapt one to work. I bought a 1-1/2 HP Ryobi plunge router for just this reason. There really is no safe way to use 1/2" bits in your router. Panel raising is the only job that would be ruled out because of that. Most bits are available in 1/4" shank size as well as 1/2". You will get years of good use out of your Skil router.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,921 Posts
Neil, you just got two very different answers to your question and you may wonder which one is right. In truth they both are. Your router is not powerful enough to do heavy work with oak. By the same token you can do many jobs by taking smaller cuts. It's a trade off that you can live with. My first router was a Craftsman 1-1/2 HP fixed base. I installed mortise locksets in hotel doors with a special jig, made nice moulding and edge treatments, many years of good service. Learn with your router and then purchase one that has the features you want. An informed decision is always the way to get great results.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
4,126 Posts
Hello, I used a 1 HP and a 1 1/2 HP Craftsman router for many years. Believe it or not I had the 1 HP job in the router table. I learned to use these routers with nothing but 1/4 bits in them. I did primarily round overs, dado's, rabbets etc. You can do most jobs other than raising panels and you can even do stub tennen and grooved doors. Learn on your router and then when you are ready for template work etc. and 1/2 inch bits there are some fine routers out there and the one BJ mentions is a great priced one and the Ryobi plunge router Mike talks of has a good reputation as well, however I would really consider one of the combination plunge/fixed base models to get your money's worth as they are great values. Have fun, let us know if we can help.

Corey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the insights, guys. Very helpful, and encouraging. I have a few 'honeydo' minor projects in mind, which I hope to be able to accomplish with the Skil. Mama wants me to build a couple of planter boxes for the outside, for which I will be using plywood and red cedar . I feel the Skil can handle that. I don't have the wherewithal to get any 'real' wood, (oak, maple, etc) for other projects at this time. I did manage to make a bookcase from pine, and it turned out pretty well, other than a few minor glitches. Thanks again for the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
and furthermore

I will jump in as the title of this forum feesl just about right for me.
I have just purchased a 1hp Ryobi router so I could do some learning beyond using my tenon saw, chisels and plane. This is a huge step for me.

Having just visited bunnings which has two shank sizes on offer I opted for the 6.5m shank for my fist set of bits. Stupidly thinking that looked about right. Wronng according to the Ryobi whan I got home. Should have used the vermiers befre I left home So please, what do I do to get these bits to fit. Both the router and the bits were intended to be sacrifices whilst I learnt to handle the tool but I would at least like to start to learn.

The Ryobi web site sucks for information so I turn to your combined knowledge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi deejaybee
Put the bits back in the box and take them back and get the right ones..

Don't try and use the bits in the router...


==========
deejaybee said:
I will jump in as the title of this forum feesl just about right for me.
I have just purchased a 1hp Ryobi router so I could do some learning beyond using my tenon saw, chisels and plane. This is a huge step for me.

Having just visited bunnings which has two shank sizes on offer I opted for the 6.5m shank for my fist set of bits. Stupidly thinking that looked about right. Wronng according to the Ryobi whan I got home. Should have used the vermiers befre I left home So please, what do I do to get these bits to fit. Both the router and the bits were intended to be sacrifices whilst I learnt to handle the tool but I would at least like to start to learn.

The Ryobi web site sucks for information so I turn to your combined knowledge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
439 Posts
Ok -- here's my early morning first cup of coffee philosophising ----

oldnewbie said:
Ok guys. I've been reading about all the different exotic routers you have, and getting more sheepish as I go along.
Don't let anyone intentionally or unintentionally make you feel that way for a second --
Unless you are Bill Gates there will always be someone who can buy something fancier than what you have. But as long as what you are using does what you need it to do -- it's a perfectly good tool.

My old AMC Hornet wasn't as fancy as a Camaro - but I put over 200K miles on it across 8 states and it never let me down. And I can't tell you how many fancy car owners I have given rides to when the roads iced up.

Judge what you have by how well it meets your needs - not by what someone else may have.

oldnewbie said:
I have a Skil 1836, 1 1/2 hp plunge router that I've been trying to learn on. Am I just beating my brains against the wall?
You beat me -
My first (about 20 years ago)
was an orange plastic Black and Decker -- I believe 3/4 hp.
Some would say that's a step above a toy -- but I made a LOTof book cases and picture frames with it.

I've had two other routers since -- a 1 hp Craftsman and my current 1.5 hp Ryobi - all 1/4" shank. And I have cut everything from mdf to oak with them. The only trick - as mentioned - is to make shallow cuts.

Lately I have had the itch to do rail and stiles and some other shaping that can be done more easily with 1/2" shank - so I broke down yesterday and bought my first 1/2 shank router (the Craftsman combo set)
NOT because anyone made me believe what I had wasn't a perfectly good tool -- I already knew better. But because I now had a need that a different tool could handle better.

oldnewbie said:
Also, does anyone know of a guide bushing plate and bushings that I can use with it?
If the base that came on the router won't accept standard PC bushings - check Rockler or Woodcraft -- there are replacement plates made just for that purpose - predrilled to fit most routers. That's what I had to do with my Ryobi.

oldnewbie said:
And to further show my stupidity, is there such a thing as an adaptor to convert 1/4" to 1/2" router bits?
Even if you find one -- I would recommend AGAINST using it.
It's a good bet that shaft and bearings and other components of your router were designed with 1/4" shanks in mind -- and trying to rig it to handle something heavier -- will probably - at best -- shorten its life.
At worst - create a dangerous situation.
If you find you need/want a 1/2" shank router -- buy one. :)

As mentioned - the Craftsman combo is on sale through today for $99
HARD to beat.

Ok - coffee cup empty -- sun is out -- and I have a customer waiting on a mantle -- you guys have a great day.
 

·
Premium Member
Retired since June 2000
Joined
·
14,942 Posts
The fact that you mentioned Bunnings would indicate that you are here in Australia, and if that is the case the only two sizes of cutters available here are 1/4" and 1/2" (6.35mm and 12.7mm) All 1/2'' routers come with a reducing collet for 1/4" and of course 1/4" routers all take the 1/4" cutters. Europe also have 8mm but I have never seen them at Bunnings which my wife claims to be my second home. You're problem intrigues me, perhaps when it's solved you will post the answer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,413 Posts
oldnewbie said:
Ok guys. I've been reading about all the different exotic routers you have, and getting more sheepish as I go along. I have a Skil 1836, 1 1/2 hp plunge router that I've been trying to learn on. Am I just beating my brains against the wall? Also, does anyone know of a guide bushing plate and bushings that I can use with it? And to further show my stupidity, is there such a thing as an adaptor to convert 1/4" to 1/2" router bits?
Neil, as others have said, if it does what you want, then it's a good tool.

As for the guide bushings, RustyW did a good post on making your own baseplate to acccept PC style bushings. It's a pretty easy project from the looks of it, one I will be trying soon for my Craftsman.

Router base plate

Brian
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top