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Casey,

Maybe this is pertinent, but possibly not!

About 10- years ago my Father-in-Law (John T. Donehoo) closed his business and retired. He had in his business an amazing array of woodworking equipment. Knowing what my business does, he offered me a unique machine. It was called a "Pattern-Making Saw". It was custom-made for the Pullman Railroad Car Co. and I understood that Yates had made several of them for Pullman. It is my guess that my Father-in-Law purchased it at an auction.

He didn't charge me for the saw and considered it a gift. I sent a couple of my guys in a large delivery truck to his business and they brought-back the machine. It was kinda like a table saw - but KING-SIZE! It had an 18" blade (.3125" kerf) and 1.125" arbor. It had an 11- horsepower electric motor.

I found the machine extremely interesting. It weighed several thousand pounds. The table was split into two sections - centered on the blade. As you're using it, the left (about 40%) would tilt - but one must be really strong to swing it up, and the right side would slide on rails - in two directions! It would slide left and right (never going all the way to the blade) and it would also slide near and away! But let me tell you something: Whenever someone goes to tilt the left or slide the right - they had better eaten their lunch, because there was nothing lightweight on that machine.

We had our electrician provide for the needs of the 11- horsepower electric motor. There was no blade guard and we were awaiting arrival of a new blade when an OSHA Inspector made a routine visit to our shop and observed the machine. I was not there at that time. I was told by my PLANT MANAGER that the OSHA Inspector went ballistic and said "NO WAY WOULD WE EVER BE ABLE TO UTILIZE THAT MACHINE!"

That machine would allow someone to do trim work with railroad cross-ties if so chosen. Best I could tell the machine was about 100 years old.

I donated the machine to a museum in Lincolnton, Georgia.

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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Casey,

Maybe this is pertinent, but possibly not!

About 10- years ago my Father-in-Law (John T. Donehoo) closed his business and retired. He had in his business an amazing array of woodworking equipment. Knowing what my business does, he offered me a unique machine. It was called a "Pattern-Making Saw". It was custom-made for the Pullman Railroad Car Co. and I understood that Yates had made several of them for Pullman. It is my guess that my Father-in-Law purchased it at an auction.

He didn't charge me for the saw and considered it a gift. I sent a couple of my guys in a large delivery truck to his business and they brought-back the machine. It was kinda like a table saw - but KING-SIZE! It had an 18" blade (.3125" kerf) and 1.125" arbor. It had an 11- horsepower electric motor.

I found the machine extremely interesting. It weighed several thousand pounds. The table was split into two sections - centered on the blade. As you're using it, the left (about 40%) would tilt - but one must be really strong to swing it up, and the right side would slide on rails - in two directions! It would slide left and right (never going all the way to the blade) and it would also slide near and away! But let me tell you something: Whenever someone goes to tilt the left or slide the right - they had better eaten their lunch, because there was nothing lightweight on that machine.

We had our electrician provide for the needs of the 11- horsepower electric motor. There was no blade guard and we were awaiting arrival of a new blade when an OSHA Inspector made a routine visit to our shop and observed the machine. I was not there at that time. I was told by my PLANT MANAGER that the OSHA Inspector went ballistic and said "NO WAY WOULD WE EVER BE ABLE TO UTILIZE THAT MACHINE!"

That machine would allow someone to do trim work with railroad cross-ties if so chosen. Best I could tell the machine was about 100 years old.

I donated the machine to a museum in Lincolnton, Georgia.

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
Did you ever make a cut with it?
Herb
 
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