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When my mother was alive, one of the things that made her so much fun to be around was the way she laughed at herself, maybe that's where I got some of this train.

Earlier today one of our members sent me a PM asking a question about a matter that required me to do some measuring in order to ask their question.

The measurement was .325". After doing the measurement with the calipers, I realized how small a thirty second of an inch which is slightly smaller than the measurement that I had just made.

I chuckled at myself and remembered mom.

Jerry
 

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I hear you Jerry. Was it .325 or .0325. When I was first introduced to the world of precise measurement, one of the very knowledgeable men that taught me used the term two's and fews. I was puzzled. I had to ask, what does that mean. He just smiled and said .002 and less, you crazy young boy. That was our minimum tolerance. He taught me soo much in the few years we worked together. Prior to that I was clueless. Of course the work that I was doing was not very precise, sheet metal screws and duct tape.

Some of my woodworking coworkers often tell me that woodworking and micrometers do not go together. Old habits are hard to let go of, as well as fond memories. Good luck on your lock miter issues, I know you will figure it out. Thanks for all of your posts.

Ellery Becnel
 

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I hear you Jerry. Was it .325 or .0325. When I was first introduced to the world of precise measurement, one of the very knowledgeable men that taught me used the term two's and fews. I was puzzled. I had to ask, what does that mean. He just smiled and said .002 and less, you crazy young boy. That was our minimum tolerance. He taught me soo much in the few years we worked together. Prior to that I was clueless. Of course the work that I was doing was not very precise, sheet metal screws and duct tape.

Some of my woodworking coworkers often tell me that woodworking and micrometers do not go together. Old habits are hard to let go of, as well as fond memories. Good luck on your lock miter issues, I know you will figure it out. Thanks for all of your posts.

Ellery Becnel
Ellery,

The measurement was .325 not .0325 just for your information.

You are sure right about micrometers not being compatible with wood working, but a .0001" micrometer has it's place in certain areas of metal work. It is hard to get away from precision but I'm slowly doing it to some degree.

Jerry
 

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I never use one of my micrometers when woodworking but my fractional/metric caliper is always close by. Also, I can't remember the last time I bothered using the vernier scale for woodworking either. A little more than something, a little less than something, or right on the money is all I usually need to know.
 

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My dad had a couple maxims he used frequently. Regarding precision in woodworking (in his case, carpentry) "Measure with a micrometer, mark with chalk and cut it with and ax." And about necessary tools, "If it can't be fixed with a pall peen hammer and a 12" common, the problem is electrical."
He was a farmer and the hammer and screwdriver was accompanied by a wad of baling wire and a rusty pair of pliers in the tractor tool box.
 
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One of my neighbors has an excavator contracting business. He claims that if he can't fix something with his machine it doesn't need fixing.
I almost believe him; I watched him basically rebuild a fence that'd blown over, with the excavator (Ok, he did need to get out of the cab to drive a few nails).
He hammered those PT fenceposts in with the bucket...made me wince.
 

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One of my neighbors has an excavator contracting business. He claims that if he can't fix something with his machine it doesn't need fixing.
I almost believe him; I watched him basically rebuild a fence that'd blown over, with the excavator (Ok, he did need to get out of the cab to drive a few nails).
He hammered those PT fenceposts in with the bucket...made me wince.
Kinda amazing,
 

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One of my neighbors has an excavator contracting business. He claims that if he can't fix something with his machine it doesn't need fixing.
I almost believe him; I watched him basically rebuild a fence that'd blown over, with the excavator (Ok, he did need to get out of the cab to drive a few nails).
He hammered those PT fenceposts in with the bucket...made me wince.
I have a small Komatsu excavator here...and you wouldn't believe the things it comes in handy for, loads of stuff other than digging.
 
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