Flat saw for the job site - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-14-2017, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
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Default Flat saw for the job site

Anyone have a recommendation for a flat saw(Japanese flat saw style). I don't want to spend a ton of money just need something for tuning up corners. Reaching for the carvex is overkill. Slowing down just for those few secs to clean a corner with a hand tool is actually a bit soothing in a fast paced environment. Almost Zen like!!

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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-14-2017, 08:41 PM
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Dozuki saw on Amazon about $30, with the ridgid backer. You can't sharpen it, you just replace the blade, which is also on Amazon. I LOVE this saw. Precise, clean cuts. Easy to control since you're pulling it. I have used it with speed square with nice results. The blade itself is very thin and would flex like mad without the backer.

https://www.amazon.com/Z-Saw-Dozuki/...anese+pull+saw

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-15-2017, 08:09 AM
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Tom's right you cant go wrong with the Japanese saw - you can cut potato chips off the end of a board, or trim flush with out leaving saw marks (with out the backer). I use one like this. One side is for ripping the other side is for cross cuts. I haven’t used any other type for decades. It takes a little adjustment to get use to the cut on the pull. Just think of it like a hacksaw you will do fine.

Its my favorite gift for friends when I visit the States.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...pf_rd_i=553220
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-15-2017, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gr8trim4u View Post
Anyone have a recommendation for a flat saw(Japanese flat saw style). I don't want to spend a ton of money just need something for tuning up corners. Reaching for the carvex is overkill. Slowing down just for those few secs to clean a corner with a hand tool is actually a bit soothing in a fast paced environment. Almost Zen like!!
I spent two years in Japan, monitoring construction contracts. On every job site, you'll find one of these ryoba saws in reach of every carpenter. Cuts on the pull stroke. Double-edged blade with one side slightly coarser for ripping.

I brought one home with me and it's hanging on the wall in my shop. I use it more than most of my hand tools.

https://www.amazon.com/Ryoba-Double-...ords=ryoba+saw

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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-15-2017, 11:21 AM
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You can contact Bret at customer service at Lee Valley Tools and describe what you need to do.
He is prompt, helpful, and can provide you with options in their Japanese saw inventory.
Do you need a backed saw like a dovetail saw, or a flexible blade to cut flush to a surface? LVT can
recommend.

Also Highland Woodworking and Hida Tools customer service can respond as well. They all carry
a great selection of quality Japanese saws.

The backed saw or dovetail described in the post above is very accurate and precise.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-15-2017, 11:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonkeyHody View Post
I spent two years in Japan, monitoring construction contracts. On every job site, you'll find one of these ryoba saws in reach of every carpenter. Cuts on the pull stroke. Double-edged blade with one side slightly coarser for ripping.

I brought one home with me and it's hanging on the wall in my shop. I use it more than most of my hand tools.

https://www.amazon.com/Ryoba-Double-...ords=ryoba+saw
Here is the USA Amazon link. Nice saw. I like the stiffener, which this one doesn't have, but the double edge would be handy on a job site.

https://www.amazon.com/Ryoba-Double-...pan+Woodworker

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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-15-2017, 12:30 PM
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The Shark brand saws are pretty good saws and run about $30-35C up here. Some have replaceable blades. They can be sharpened with a file that Lee Valley sells. I've sharpened mine a few times. It's time consuming and I've never gotten back to factory sharp but I was able to make a noticeable improvement. Once you used a good pull saw you'll never use the old style again. I've been using them for 20-25 years now. My old Nicholson is rusty from lack of use, hanging on a pegboard hook.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 08:01 AM
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Default Useful product

I don't know about the availability in North America, but Topman of Japan sells a precision saw guide with a pull-saw (pistol grip handle) which is amazing. I have often thought that, limited to one saw and pallets on a desert island, this would be my pick. https://www.fine-tools.com/G-sawguide-einfach.html
Apart from dead-on plumb-and-square crosscuts, the adavanced model can also be set for compound mitre cuts, much faster than a power saw. Unless one is doing repeated cuts, the Topman guide is more convenient, the saw cuts very rapidly, and the cut finish is very satisfactory.
It is at its best for cross and mitre cuts. It can be set for ripping, but the teeth in the supplied blade are not the most effective for that purpose.
There is also a basic model guide -can do quite a lot, but requires disasembly and reassembly to change angles. The advanced model operates on allen keys (wrench supplied).
Might be a bit tricky for folk with large hands.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Biagio View Post
I don't know about the availability in North America, but Topman of Japan sells a precision saw guide with a pull-saw (pistol grip handle) which is amazing. I have often thought that, limited to one saw and pallets on a desert island, this would be my pick. https://www.fine-tools.com/G-sawguide-einfach.html
Apart from dead-on plumb-and-square crosscuts, the adavanced model can also be set for compound mitre cuts, much faster than a power saw. Unless one is doing repeated cuts, the Topman guide is more convenient, the saw cuts very rapidly, and the cut finish is very satisfactory.
It is at its best for cross and mitre cuts. It can be set for ripping, but the teeth in the supplied blade are not the most effective for that purpose.
There is also a basic model guide -can do quite a lot, but requires disasembly and reassembly to change angles. The advanced model operates on allen keys (wrench supplied).
Might be a bit tricky for folk with large hands.
Found it on Amazon (US) for $70. Really nice item! https://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Okad...r+japanese+saw

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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 01-20-2017, 05:48 AM Thread Starter
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Thx guys. Bought the Dozuki. Will give it a shot over the next couple of weeks and report back.

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