Ridgid EB44242 Oscillating Edge Belt/Spindle Sander - Router Forums
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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-02-2016, 09:21 PM Thread Starter
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Default Ridgid EB44242 Oscillating Edge Belt/Spindle Sander

I have a Ridgid EB44242 Oscillating Edge Belt/Spindle Sander that I have used for years (out of warranty). When I turn the switch on, the motor will hum but the belt / spindle will not turn. If I spin the belt by hand before turning it on, it will sometimes continue to spin, the humming will stop and it will work as designed. I often have to try several times before it spins up and works correctly. Once on it will run for as long as I need it to (maybe 15 min is the longest I've run before stopping it).

Any idea if this is repairable? If I knew what the problem was and could get the parts I would/could fix it. I did take it apart but didn't see anything obvious (burn marks or sawdust where it doesn't belong).

I did just send an email to Ridgid customer service but since it is years old (not sure how many but more than the 3 years its under warranty) I would be surprised if they will help beyond pointing me to someone who I can pay to fix it. I expect paying someone to fix it would cost at least 1/2 the cost of a new one so at that point I'm better off selling this one for parts and buying a new one.

If this one does need to be replaced, should I:
  1. Buy another like it (from what I can find it's the only option in this price range for both tools).
  2. First buy a disk sander.

thanks
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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-02-2016, 09:49 PM
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You could check here Ridgid EB44241 Parts List and Diagram : eReplacementParts.com for parts but if it's the motor assembly, it appears to be discontinued. Other parts seem to be available.

I have the same sander and also for a long time...if needs replacement, I would buy the same one again...FWIW...

Are you sure none of the drive parts are too tight...like bearing, bushings, etc...? Does the spindle spin freely...? No sawdust underneath it...? Have you removed the belt sander assembly to see if it changes the symptom...?

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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-02-2016, 10:48 PM
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The fact that it runs after you spin it leads me to think it is a starting circuit problem.

I haven't ever looked too far under the hood of mine, is it a brushed motor? the brushes could be bad
Capacitor start motor? The cap could be bad, or the centrifugal switch stuck
Other starting styles could have a relay in them as well.

Most of these problems would be a cheap fix.

Almost tempted to get inside of it now and have a look.... Maybe I can find a wiring diagram tomorrow
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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-02-2016, 10:57 PM
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The one other problem that's possible is one burned out winding. For some reason motors seem to stop on the same one almost every time, at least that's been my experience. Moving it off that winding will get it going but you can usually tell that it isn't quite up to full speed or power when that happens.
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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-02-2016, 11:08 PM
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Default Time to test the relay

Page 29 of the manual shows a relay is used to control the start circuit. The contacts could be burnt, sticking, or the coil shot.

Should be pretty easy and cheap to find a replacement or equivalent.


Relay shows $20 at ereplacement parts if it is shot.

http://www.ereplacementparts.com/relay-p-161651.html
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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-03-2016, 12:11 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickp View Post
You could check here Ridgid EB44241 Parts List and Diagram : eReplacementParts.com for parts but if it's the motor assembly, it appears to be discontinued. Other parts seem to be available.

I have the same sander and also for a long time...if needs replacement, I would buy the same one again...FWIW...

Are you sure none of the drive parts are too tight...like bearing, bushings, etc...? Does the spindle spin freely...? No sawdust underneath it...? Have you removed the belt sander assembly to see if it changes the symptom...?
When it first started happening last year I tore the whole thing down as much as I could, cleaning as I went. Motors are a bit of a black box for me, I understand the basic physics of how they work but I don't know the specific details of individual motors. So my inspection was for looking for burns, dirt, sawdust where it obviously doesn't belong, that kind of thing.


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Page 29 of the manual shows a relay is used to control the start circuit. The contacts could be burnt, sticking, or the coil shot.
Ohh cool, thanks for figuring that out. I'll google how to test the/a relay next weekend.
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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-03-2016, 12:19 AM Thread Starter
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I should also say this has been a progressive problem. Last year it was working fine. Then every once in a while it would stop working. After a few dozen starts it would hum more often than it would start right up. It was in that time that I inspected the unit. It works (or fails to work) the same for spindle and for the belt. I only get to use the tool a few times each month so when I say it started doing this last year, keep in mind that that's probably only about 5-10 running hours ago. Now it never starts right up and it takes several tries before it does start. Last month (last time I tried using it before tonight) it refused to start at all. I tried to get it to start for several minutes before I decided to let it cool down before trying to start again. That was the first time that day I had tried to use it. Once it gets going it seems to work fine. So I like the explanation that it's a bad relay more than I like the explanation of a bad winding. But again, I only know the high school physics level of detail on motors.

thanks!
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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-03-2016, 12:37 AM Thread Starter
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I decided to work on it a little more tonight. Who needs to be awake for work tomorrow?

The relay looks good. I googled testing a relay and watched a video regarding automotive relay. That doesn't seem to apply since there are only three leads on this one, the video I watched showed four leads. I think that may be a different kind of relay because he was talking about low voltage vs high voltage DC. This one is AC and the switch seems to be in line directly from the power cord with no transformer so that's ~120v AC. One from the switch (I think the ground side) and two from the motor. I came back to the computer to look for a wiring diagram and info on how to test a three lead relay.
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-03-2016, 01:23 AM Thread Starter
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I didn't figure out how to test the relay but it looks ok. I put a volt meter on it but since I don't know how its supposed to work I don't know if it tested correctly.
In an attempt to see if a winding was bad, I tried turning it on, when it just hummed loudly I turned it off, spun the motor a few degrees and tried again. I tried this about 20 times (maybe two revolutions) before the top of the motor started smoking.
I unplugged it and pulled the motor from the housing. I removed the top of the motor and find the nylon string wound with the wire is what was smoking. Other than the coils getting too hot from having volts without spinning, I can't see anything wrong with it.
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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-03-2016, 09:08 AM
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Everend, Some capacitor start motors use a mechanical centrifical switch (located at the opposite end of the motor) that could be sticking. remove the opposite motor end to see if it has this mechanical switch. if so just lube it to get it working again. there are an extra set of windings in the field that give the armature an extra jolt of magetizem for a millisecond when you turn it on and as the armature begins to spin....the extra voltage is no longer needed and it shuts off, and continues to run on the Run windings. Think of the motor as having both Start and Run windings. Some motors use a capacitor that steps up the voltage to provide the extra jolt for the start windings. This type of motor is called an Induction Motor. The advantage of an Induction motor is the only wear parts are the bearings and it runs using less current than a Universal Motor. A Universal Motor has brushes that energize the armature windings instead of just magnetizum so it generates more wear and heat. The advantage a Universal Motor has is that it has almost full torque when it starts.
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