If You Haven't Tried Sneakin Up, You Need To... - Router Forums
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-10-2016, 02:27 PM Thread Starter
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Default If You Haven't Tried Sneakin Up, You Need To...

I'm talking about sneaking up on a miter lock bit cut. I had to cut two new corner styles for the cedar chest project that I started to work on a couple of years ago before my health issue. During the time of my recovery I did a lot of thinking and wondering about several woodworking issues and one of the things that I wanted to try when I got well was to sneak up on the miter lock cuts by doing the following.

After setting the bit to the proper height as per the directions described in my earlier thread. This morning tried the sneak up issue on an actual project, that being the corner styles. After seeing where the final cut would end up and referencing that point on the scale on the Incra LS17.

I moved the fence forward so that only a very shallow cut would be made on the first pass and then after each cut I moved the fence rearward about 1/16" and made the second cut. Since I was making two styles I had two parts for each style. Two parts were needed to be cut the with the workpiece laying flat on the table. Ran both parts at each fence setting of course. After several cuts the final cut was made. I did the same thing with the other two parts that needed to be cut with the face of the parts against the fence. All went well and I couldn't ask for a better fit. There was no chattering of the bit as the work pieces were fed into the bit, smooth as butter and what a nice smooth surfaces resulted.

If you are having problems with the feed into the miter lock bit, I'd sure recommend that you at least give what I have described a try.

Tomorrow I'm going to try to sneak up on some end grain cuts as in the past, they have been the real challenges for me in the past compared to cutting with the grain.

Jerry

Last edited by Jerry Bowen; 10-10-2016 at 02:42 PM.
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-10-2016, 03:50 PM
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What you describe,Jerry, is a good safe way to go and get good results, but it would be very time consuming if making a lot of drawer boxes. And I might add that most lock miter joints are made on end grain. If a box beam or pedestal, "L" shaped corners etc. was being made it might be used on edge grain. For me I use one pass and as long as it is clamped tight and fed at a rate that sounds and feels good there doesn't seem to be a problem. Cutting them freehand is another matter. I have only done it in plywood though, maybe solid wood is different.

I might add that doing numerous set-ups creeping up on it lends to chances of a screw up, for me.
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-10-2016, 05:21 PM Thread Starter
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What you describe,Jerry, is a good safe way to go and get good results, but it would be very time consuming if making a lot of drawer boxes. And I might add that most lock miter joints are made on end grain. If a box beam or pedestal, "L" shaped corners etc. was being made it might be used on edge grain. For me I use one pass and as long as it is clamped tight and fed at a rate that sounds and feels good there doesn't seem to be a problem. Cutting them freehand is another matter. I have only done it in plywood though, maybe solid wood is different.

I might add that doing numerous set-ups creeping up on it lends to chances of a screw up, for me.
Herb

Herb,

So far the majority of the miter lock cuts that I have needed to do were long cuts with the grain, by long I mean about 20", the length of the corner styles for the cedar chest. These cuts are much different that the end grain cuts that you have described I suppose.

If what you are doing works well for you then of course there is not need to do what I described, but I have not, as yet anyway, been able to make the long cuts that I described to my satisfaction. That's why I tried to do the sneak up thing.

I am anxious to start trying to cut end grain again. So far, the few times that I have tried to cut into end grain I have not been able to it to my satisfaction. Clampping is the big issue, especially if the work piece is narrow and/or short, say only a couple of inches wide and three or four inches long.

As far as being time consuming, I probably have more time than good sense, so time is not much of an issue for me, but of course that can change.

I believe that sometime way back I told you that I wanted to make some sort of a sled for the end grain cuts but have not figured out how to approach the problem yet.

Jerru
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-10-2016, 05:56 PM
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Came in expecting something Halloween related
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-10-2016, 10:15 PM
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I watched the Woodsmith TV shop guys sneak up on dado joints. It seems to work well.
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-11-2016, 12:13 PM
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I use sneak up to fit inside parts for a precise fit. Somewhere I have the magnetic jig (Woodpecker's I think) for setting miter lock bits, which requires that you center to the thickness of the wood. Finding center is a little easier using a small item from Rockler, a center finder jig that uses two pegs and a pencil. Put a peg on each side of the piece, then pull the pencil in the middle down to mark the exact center on the wood. You then line the Woodpecker jig up with that center line by raising/lowering the bit. I haven't used it for a long time, but it seemed to work fast and accurately. I'll have to look for it when I get back home because I have about 20 drawers to make at some point and that jig would be nicer for that job than other ways I've considered. I'll be using half inch Baltic Birch ply. It will be the first try with that thin of stock, any one have a caution or hint about that?

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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-11-2016, 02:53 PM
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Once I get my bit height and fence position just right (using my lock miter master) I don't like to move anything to "sneak up" on the cut. I do it without making adjustments by clamping temporary fences or table shims in place to reduce the depth that the bit cuts, then just remove these when doing the final cuts. They are just thin pieces of scrap with a clearance notch for the router bit and I hold them in place with small clamps. I can usually get away with a light cut 1/3-1/2 of the final depth, followed by the finish pass.

It's good to see you back in the shop again, Jerry.

Charley

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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 10-11-2016, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Once I get my bit height and fence position just right (using my lock miter master) I don't like to move anything to "sneak up" on the cut. I do it without making adjustments by clamping temporary fences or table shims in place to reduce the depth that the bit cuts, then just remove these when doing the final cuts. They are just thin pieces of scrap with a clearance notch for the router bit and I hold them in place with small clamps. I can usually get away with a light cut 1/3-1/2 of the final depth, followed by the finish pass.

It's good to see you back in the shop again, Jerry.

Charley

Charley,
In essence you are doing the same thing that I have been talking about. With the Incra LS 17 it is not a problem to move the fence as one can return to the position for the final cut without any problem at all.

Like what is said so often and is true, TIMTOWTSAC.

Jerry

Last edited by Jerry Bowen; 10-11-2016 at 04:23 PM.
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