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post #101 of 115 (permalink) Old 06-21-2019, 01:23 AM
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Default Sanding disc installation jig

One of the little irritations I regularly experience in the shop is trying to line up the holes in a new sanding disc with the holes in my ROS sanders. I often have to peel it back off and try again. The other day it dawned on me that there are two methods to get the paper on oriented properly the first time and every time. I have 3 DWs, 2 Bosch, and one PC. I haven't tried it yet on the PC but that shouldn't matter. The holes in the DWs are larger than the Bosch and the methods work a little better on the Bosch because of it. The holes in my sanding discs are 3/8" and the holes in the Bosches are also 3/8". The DWs are a bit larger. By using dowels to fit through the holes in the paper and into the holes in the sanders it's possible to locate them accurately enough every time and quickly. The jig I made I think might work a little better with longer dowels but I didn't want them to bottom out in the holes before the paper made contact with the velcro on the pad. I chamfered the ends of the dowels in a drill to make sure they went into the holes in the pad easily. The last picture shows both methods. Just using 3 loose dowels is the simplest method.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #102 of 115 (permalink) Old 06-21-2019, 09:30 AM
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My son in law is a professional ceramic tile installer. He does allot of high end homes in the area. He uses coped cuts on all the trim molding just like your example. When his trim guy isn't around he has to do his own. Very easy to do with practice. I am not sure why more people don't use that technique.
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post #103 of 115 (permalink) Old 06-21-2019, 09:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
One of the little irritations I regularly experience in the shop is trying to line up the holes in a new sanding disc with the holes in my ROS sanders. I often have to peel it back off and try again. The other day it dawned on me that there are two methods to get the paper on oriented properly the first time and every time. I have 3 DWs, 2 Bosch, and one PC. I haven't tried it yet on the PC but that shouldn't matter. The holes in the DWs are larger than the Bosch and the methods work a little better on the Bosch because of it. The holes in my sanding discs are 3/8" and the holes in the Bosches are also 3/8". The DWs are a bit larger. By using dowels to fit through the holes in the paper and into the holes in the sanders it's possible to locate them accurately enough every time and quickly. The jig I made I think might work a little better with longer dowels but I didn't want them to bottom out in the holes before the paper made contact with the velcro on the pad. I chamfered the ends of the dowels in a drill to make sure they went into the holes in the pad easily. The last picture shows both methods. Just using 3 loose dowels is the simplest method.
You can expand this idea a little further

- Make the dowels a little longer so that your supply of replacement sanding discs can be stored on the fixture

- make a second disc with slightly larger through holes on the same hole pattern

- stack your spare discs on the first plate, drop the second disc on top and add a little weight in the center to stop the discs from curling during storage.

- to load a new sanding disc, remove the upper disc, turn the stack over, align the dowels with the holes in the sander and let the top (actually bottom at that point) sanding disc drop on to the sander pad.

Or, if the shorter dowel is easier to use. still make the holder to store your spare discs but stop them from curling - make one for each grit and label the holders.
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post #104 of 115 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 11:43 AM
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On the subject of clamps, here are some I made for use around the bandsaw and drill press. Since I have them in various sizes, I keep finding other uses for them. I wrote an instructable on how to make them.

The ones on the right have rare earth magnets in the jaws, to allow me to hang them on the bandsaw cabinets or elsewhere. I like that feature, but, now that I've used them, would put them on the opposite side, so the adjustment knob is toward you, when the magnet is holding the clamp down on the table.



https://www.instructables.com/id/SMA...HOLDING-CLAMP/
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The reason I have what you want is, I never lent it out before.

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post #105 of 115 (permalink) Old 07-16-2019, 01:14 PM
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I don`t know if this is going to work or not but it is a case of nothing lost if it doesn`t. I grabbed an old can of paint to use and it had skinned over. While using it I thought of the Stop Loss bags I bought from Lee Valley that are for storing partial cans of paint in. You fill them then squeeze the air out and seal them. Problem is they cost about $5 each. Then it dawned on me that maybe a zip lock bag might do the same thing for pennies. So I had my wife hold the zip lock bag with a filter in it`s opening and I poured the paint in and sealed all but a corner. Then I squeezed all the air out and finished sealing it. I`m going to store the bag in an empty coffee container to protect it. It`ll take time to see if this works but it`s worth a try.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #106 of 115 (permalink) Old 07-16-2019, 07:10 PM
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a rectangular ''Tupper Ware'' will hold the Ziploc bag for you...
fold the bag over the rim and secure w/ clothes pins or spring clamps...
the clothes pins or clamps w/ hold the filter...
dollar stores have the containers, depending on size, for 1 ea packs to 6 packs for a dollar...
and they are clear containers, so use the containers to hold the filled baggies...
there's no reason round containers wouldn't work...
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”

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post #107 of 115 (permalink) Old 07-16-2019, 07:26 PM
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I store lots of things in 1qt and 1 gallon freezer bags. They are a little heavier duty. I can't imagine that water based paint would leak, other than with a seak seam. Definitely need a second container to hoild them up, a plastic tub seems practical. But you could also get a little larger tub and make cardboard or thin ply separators between the bags.

Matching colors of paint you used years ago isn't always easy, so storing a small amount of each color in a bag would give you a sample that should last for a long time. Use a marker to write where the paint was used: "Front room, north facing wall." No memory issues later.

And, the bags will allow you to remix the paint as most of it separates over time. I think you'd also have to squeeze all the air out or you'd get a "skin" formed inside the bag. Great idea Charles.
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post #108 of 115 (permalink) Old 07-16-2019, 10:19 PM
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This is oil based Rustoleum so I should know within a few days if the solvent isn`t compatible with the bags. I had to use some already in a touch up spray gun. You have to be careful pouring it out as the center of gravity starts changing. There was a little left over when I was done with the gun so I opened the bag and clipped one side to the coffee jug with a spring clamp and poured it back in and that went really easy.

The Tupperware is a good idea. That would make the bags stackable on a shelf.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #109 of 115 (permalink) Old 07-17-2019, 06:52 AM
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Hi CHARLES, what is your opinion of Rustoleum products? I have never seen them mentioned on the Forum, usually other brands which seem specific to North America. We have had various Rustoleum spray paints available for years here, but in the last while, I bought some rapid-drying wood stains, as well as a water-based polyurethane, that I am very taken with.
The rapid-drying was just that - overcoatable in just over an hour. The poly was said to require no sanding between coats - I was sceptical about that claim, but it did what it said, with a very good finish.
The only problem here is the price - equivalent of US $10 for a tiny 250 ml tin.
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post #110 of 115 (permalink) Old 07-17-2019, 08:02 AM
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I like the brand...
better than most of them out there...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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