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post #111 of 133 (permalink) Old 07-17-2019, 08:53 AM
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I don`t know if this is going to work or not but it is a case of nothing lost if it doesn`t. I grabbed an old can of paint to use and it had skinned over. While using it I thought of the Stop Loss bags I bought from Lee Valley that are for storing partial cans of paint in. You fill them then squeeze the air out and seal them. Problem is they cost about $5 each. Then it dawned on me that maybe a zip lock bag might do the same thing for pennies. So I had my wife hold the zip lock bag with a filter in it`s opening and I poured the paint in and sealed all but a corner. Then I squeezed all the air out and finished sealing it. I`m going to store the bag in an empty coffee container to protect it. It`ll take time to see if this works but it`s worth a try.
I was wondering if anyone had ever tried using welding shielding gas co2 argon mix to help store paint. I have been thinking about this for a while now. I always have welding gas in the shop. I may give it a try the next time I have a paint can open. Maybe put the can in and fill the bag with the gas. Any thoughts on the subject.
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post #112 of 133 (permalink) Old 07-17-2019, 12:51 PM
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I keep a little Rusoleum around, mainly for metal, but it is something I reach for when I have something small to paint. Good stuff, so long as you don't over spray.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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post #113 of 133 (permalink) Old 07-17-2019, 01:45 PM
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I was wondering if anyone had ever tried using welding shielding gas co2 argon mix to help store paint. I have been thinking about this for a while now. I always have welding gas in the shop. I may give it a try the next time I have a paint can open. Maybe put the can in and fill the bag with the gas. Any thoughts on the subject.
Lee Valley used to sell spray cans of something along that line Roxanne (at about $13-14). I can`t remember what the ad description said it was anymore and I don`t think they still carry it. It has to be heavier than air so that it both stays in the can until you get the lid on and displaces any oxygen in the can up towards the lid away from the surface of the paint. I see argon`s atomic number is 18 which puts it heavier than air at about 14.7 (primarily oxygen at 16 and nitrogen at 14) and so is the CO2 so it should fit the bill. Definitely worth a try.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #114 of 133 (permalink) Old 07-19-2019, 09:24 AM
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Here is a product that Rockler sells called Bloxygen.

https://www.rockler.com/bloxygen-gas...MaAqQQEALw_wcB
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post #115 of 133 (permalink) Old 07-19-2019, 09:42 AM
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Here is a product that Rockler sells called Bloxygen.

https://www.rockler.com/bloxygen-gas...MaAqQQEALw_wcB
I see it is canned argon. Argon is totally inert. It won`t react with any other element. I guess the question of whether welding gas will work is whether the paint is capable over time of stripping some of the oxygen atoms away from the CO2 that is in it. Since the molar mass of argon is about 40 and CO2 is about 48 the CO2 is what is going to sit on top of the paint layer. I would still think that has to be better than just straight air.

Looking that info up I found that argon is the 3rd most common component in our atmosphere. There`s more of it than there is water vapour and 23 more times of it than CO2.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #116 of 133 (permalink) Old 08-06-2020, 10:10 AM
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Default Simple mortise jig

I needed to make some mortises in the ends of some 2 x 4 s. The easiest way is with a router so I made a simple jig to do that. The jig takes about 10 minutes to make not counting time for the glue to dry. One of the advantages of this jig is that the construction method guarantees that the mortise will be both parallel to the faces and will be dead center in the board (if that's what you want).

All the jig is is 2 pieces of some panel material with strips glued to it. You use a plunge router with a guide bushing and the guide bushing runs along between the two strips. The best way to get a perfect fit is to cut the strips a little wider than needed and then with some trial and error trim them on the table saw until the guide bushing just fits between them when they are clamped onto the lumber. I was using a little DW611 for the job and it has a small footprint so I didn't need a wider base for it to sit on but if you do you can add strips on the outside faces of the side panels for a wider foot print.

The only somewhat critical criteria is that the strips must be flush with the top edge of the panel material. I didn't need to worry about the length of my mortises so I just marked the ends and sneaked up on them. The built in light on the 611 helps considerably in that. If you need exact length mortises then you can glue or pin on cross strips on top so that the router butts up to them when done. You can also glue a strip or strips underneath to register against your lumber.

If you need an offset mortise then calculate how wide one strip needs to be plus the offset from the guide bushing ( O.D. of the guide bushing minus the O.D. of the router bit /2) and make the strip for the other side wider and only trim it to get to the final fit. One photo shows the backside of the jig pieces with the strips glued on and the other shows them clamped onto my board.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #117 of 133 (permalink) Old 08-06-2020, 10:29 AM
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Next new jig. I needed to cut a bunch of pieces exactly the same length with my cut off saw. If this is something you do often then you may want to keep this around and do a nicer job of it than I did. The concept is simple and it takes 5 minutes to make. All I did was take an 8' offcut from a sheet of OSB and screw cleats on the bottom that fit on either side of the SCMS bed. That locked it on so that the OSB strip couldn't move. That allowed me to clamp a stop at the distances I needed. If you need longer that 8' you could laminate thin strips to each other to extend it. In order to keep from cutting it in half I had to add a spacer against the fence so that I could keep the saw blade just deep enough to cut the boards off without cutting much into the OSB. One photo shows the cleats under the strip and the other shows it set up on my saw. Worked like a charm by the way. The pieces came out deadly accurate.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #118 of 133 (permalink) Old 08-06-2020, 10:40 AM
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Default Home made splitter

One more. I was sawing some 2 x lumber to get rid or the radius edges and was getting some saw marks as the boards would try and wander away from the fence so I decided I needed a splitter finally. I needed it right away and I'm nowhere close to where I could go buy a Microjig so I needed to improvise. The saw blade I'm using is a thin rim which has a .098" cut. I thought that maybe a machine screw screwed upwards from the bottom of my home made saw insert might do it and I checked a #40 one I had and it was just slightly over that. I figured I could file it a little if need be after I installed it. After marking lines down each side of the saw blade onto the insert I drilled a pilot hole between the lines and installed the screw from the bottom. The screw was a self tapping but if it hadn't been I could have tapped the MDF I used for the insert with a standard threading tap. As it turns out I didn't need to file the sides down after and my boards came off the saw like they had been run across my jointer. The splitter really did make a difference. Cost was zero as I already had the screw and the installation time was maybe 15 or 20 minutes. If I don't need the splitter I just switch it with another insert. One photo shows the installed screw and the other shows the backside of the insert.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.

Last edited by Cherryville Chuck; 08-06-2020 at 10:43 AM.
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post #119 of 133 (permalink) Old 08-06-2020, 10:50 AM
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Last one for now. Most of us have seen board straightening jigs but I thought that maybe some of the guests and newcomers might not have. It's just a strip of OSB (or ply) with a couple of toggle clamps attached and 2 stops at exactly the same distance from the factory edge and one at the end to keep the board from sliding during the cut.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #120 of 133 (permalink) Old 08-06-2020, 11:27 AM
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Thanks, Charles.
Nothing like learning fro the 10 000 hours guys.
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