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post #41 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-17-2016, 12:20 PM
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I always have a couple boxes around because they do make life SO much better. Yesterday I was doing a wipe on finish on a door and they were a better choice than my quick gloves. However, throughout a day, I find myself reaching for a dab of stain, a bit of shellac or some other sticky or staining product to use and the time it takes to put on or pull off a regular disposable glove causes me to "tough it." After all, that was thirty seconds of valuable goof-off time to do a five second job. For those, the quick disconnect gloves are ideal.

Just for reference, regarding the HF gloves, I do find they hold up as well or even better than those from a more expensive [and prettier] box.


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Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
Harbor has 50 packs of 7 mil nitrille gloves for about $10 bucks. Last far longer than the thin ones, easier to put on and remove. But they're still flexible anough so you can work finish into corners and tight areas. The light weight gloves ofte get tears in the finger tips that leak finish, paint, etc all over my fingers. The 7 mil have never had that problem.

The reason I have what you want is, I never lent it out before.

Scraps are a myth.
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post #42 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-17-2016, 12:24 PM
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Default An Oldie But Goodie - Sandpaper Cutter

For those without a paper cutter, or who don't want to use it or scissors, this simple-to-build cutter I borrowed from a magazine fifteen or so years ago is a must have shop fixture for me. It cuts sand paper for my quarter sheet sander quickly and well.

To make one, you just need a piece of plywood a little bigger than a standard sheet of sandpaper, a couple flat washers, a couple screws a hacksaw blade, a felt tip marker and a standard sheet of sandpaper.

1) Secure the bandsaw blade to the plywood at the center of the plywood, as seen in the picture. One flat washer should be installed between each end of the bandsaw blade and the plywood. This will give enough room to slide a sheet of sand paper under the blade.

2) Draw two lines at top to bottom and left to right between exact centers of the sandpaper, splitting it into four, each of which would fit a standard pad sander.

3) Slide the sandpaper under the blade (it will only fit lengthwise, at this point) until one of the lines lines up with the teeth of the blade. Hold the paper in place and trace around the lower half of the paper (below where the teeth are).

From now on, when using the cutter, you merely push the paper up under the blade until it lines with this line.

4) Still holding the sandpaper from moving, reach to the top right or left and lift and pull down on the paper, so the part at the teeth of the blade are pulled against it, ripping the paper across the blade.

5) Now take one of the two resulting pieces and, again, line up the line you drew on the sandpaper with the teeth of the blade. When in position, again trace around the paper.

6) For the final cut and, again, while still holding the paper in place, lift the upper edge of the sandpaper and pull it down across the teeth to rip it.

You should now have three two sheets of paper that fit your pad sander. Just repeat the process to, quickly, cut more sheets for the sander. I find I can cut two sheets at a time.
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The reason I have what you want is, I never lent it out before.

Scraps are a myth.

Last edited by Dejure; 11-17-2016 at 12:55 PM.
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post #43 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-17-2016, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dejure View Post
For those without a paper cutter, or who don't want to use it or scissors, this simple-to-build cutter I borrowed from a magazine fifteen or so years ago is a must have shop fixture for me. It cuts sand paper for my quarter sheet sander quickly and well.
Is that a hacksaw blade used as a cutter?

<Chas>

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post #44 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-17-2016, 12:54 PM
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Charles, yes it is. I probably should have made that more clear.

The hacksaw blade works very well. Even a dull one will do a pretty good job.

The reason I have what you want is, I never lent it out before.

Scraps are a myth.
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post #45 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-17-2016, 10:26 PM
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I made a box with horizontal dividers to hold different grades of sand paper. The idea was to organize my stock of paper. Well good luck with that. On the to I put thin strips of wood to guide my sizes, then put the hacksaw blade across the side of the box. I would have put up a photo but then I would have had to remove all the stuff piled on top of it. LOL

"The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits". Albert Einstein
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post #46 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-18-2016, 09:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dejure View Post
I always have a couple boxes around because they do make life SO much better. Yesterday I was doing a wipe on finish on a door and they were a better choice than my quick gloves. However, throughout a day, I find myself reaching for a dab of stain, a bit of shellac or some other sticky or staining product to use and the time it takes to put on or pull off a regular disposable glove causes me to "tough it." After all, that was thirty seconds of valuable goof-off time to do a five second job. For those, the quick disconnect gloves are ideal.

Just for reference, regarding the HF gloves, I do find they hold up as well or even better than those from a more expensive [and prettier] box.
I haven't made the comparison. But the 7 mil gloves last through many uses. I like the lighter ones for finishing though, a little easier to work things into corners.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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post #47 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-21-2016, 10:48 PM
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Default Double edge guide

I was rearranging some of my gear and part of that was re hanging 3 edge guides that came with routers. Two had fixed rods but the 3rd one had movable rods and the rods it came with were longer than the other two. I had been meaning to make a second edge guide for one so that if I needed to make a long groove in a board I could lock the board between the edge guides and prevent wandering. I took a birch block and drilled two 31/32" holes on my drill press for the 12mm rods on the guide. Then I sawed the block roughly through the center of the holes with a thin rip blade. I drilled a hole through the blocks for a bolt and mounted a t-nut in a slightly countersunk hole on the bottom side of the lower half. I was thinking about trying to use a threaded knob on top but it lands directly under one of the router's handles so it's going to have to be a common bolt. The bolt holds the clamp on tightly and the rod grooves self align the two halves. I added a piece on the bottom to register against what I'm routing. It's a little wider than necessary and I may rip a little off it once I go to use it. This was a very simple build you just need a table saw and drill press.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #48 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-22-2016, 09:17 AM Thread Starter
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Chuck that jig deserves a bobj3 award

Learning is an exciting adventure
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post #49 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-23-2016, 06:16 PM
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Default coping a joint

Coped joints in moldings used to be common but the miter saw eventually won out and you don't see them as much anymore but they still do look better and a miter joint looks like crap if the wood shrinks where a coped joint not so much. A jig came out a few years ago that was supposed to make the job much easier and while looking at the jig I figured out the easy way to cut one. All you have to do is cut a 45 bevel on the molding and cut to the edge of the bevel with a coping saw which is basically a poor man's scroll saw. The first picture shows the molding with part of the bevel cut and my coping saw hanging on the piece. The second photo is the finished cut with another piece of the molding held against. The closeup of the white against white is a bit over exposed but the lack of shadow at the joint shows how well it fits together.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #50 of 115 (permalink) Old 11-23-2016, 07:22 PM
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Yes! I don't know why more people don't use the coped cut method. I actually prefer it for the reason you gave, Charles; it's a lot more forgiving.
A lot of drywall corners aren't a flat surface with the walls adjacent, due to the mudded corner...maybe 8" - 12" out in either direction (both inside and outside corners).
The coped piece allows you to put pressure against the inner piece, helping to hold it tight/flat against the wall.
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