SHOP HACKS / bobj3 corner - Router Forums
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post #1 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-25-2016, 07:33 PM Thread Starter
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Default SHOP HACKS / bobj3 corner

When I joined the forum there frequent posts regarding cost cutting or jig rigging. In todays lingo I think the kids are calling these "hacks". Anyhow bobj3 was full of hacks. His bottle cap knobs is one still mentioned. He also was the joke a day thread starter. Anyhow I think a thread for shop hacks would be useful for everyone. Especially to those of us on harbor freight budgets.
Got any good hacks to share?

Learning is an exciting adventure
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post #2 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-25-2016, 07:45 PM Thread Starter
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when planing material at a dimension other than the factory stops I get cross eyed trying to read the factory scale So to register the thickness I put masking tape along the scale and mark the indicator

Learning is an exciting adventure
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post #3 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-25-2016, 08:06 PM
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One tip I shared that made Bob laugh was that I used Bondo to repair router templates that were damaged, or to fill screw holes on MDF speaker cabinets I made. It dries rock hard, doesn't shrink, and sands perfectly.

only $15 for the big gallon can...

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post #4 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-25-2016, 09:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kp91 View Post
One tip I shared that made Bob laugh was that I used Bondo to repair templates that were damaged
If any of mine need repairing, I usually just cut a small section out, then glue a piece of wood in, and sand to shape. Works great. Cheap too.

And, sometimes when I'm making my routing masters, I just make on layer as usual, then instead of using a solid piece on it and routing to shape, I glue on small pieces, and rout them. Gives a nice solid master, saves wood, and uses up pieces I'd normally just have to toss.

"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
I am currently unsupervised. I know, it freaks me out too. But the possibilities are endless!
Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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post #5 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-25-2016, 09:18 PM
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Rubbing alcohol removes pencil marks from wood. Just dampen a shop rag and apply it. A couple swipes is all it takes.

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post #6 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-25-2016, 09:21 PM
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I use toothpicks or slivers cut with a chisel or knife to repair screw holes. Put a dab of glue on them and jamb them in the hole. When the glue dries I shave them flush. It's also a good way to move to the screw over slightly to straighten up a hinge or anything like that that sometimes needs a small adjustment.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #7 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-26-2016, 06:55 AM
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I've used the method Charles described for years and have had great success with it and no known failures.

"The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits". Albert Einstein
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post #8 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-26-2016, 08:18 AM
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Wow. I see a whole new forum category opening up here.

It seems I never finish what I
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post #9 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-26-2016, 09:07 AM
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Have a small dent to remove from a wood surface, try laying a damp cloth over it and running a hot iron (preferably not your wife's current one) over it to steam the wood a bit. Works better on softer wood of course but I have used the approach on oak. The key is to not get the wood totally soaked, just a tad damp.
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post #10 of 115 (permalink) Old 10-27-2016, 04:11 PM
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Instead of using drawer slides I've used strips of counter top laminate instead a few times. One strip in the carcass and one on the bottom of the drawer runners. If they get sticky just rub some parafin wax on the drawer runners. I've also used this to fix the drawers on an old antique sideboard where the runners had worn into the carcass (wood on wood) causing the drawer front to drag when closing. The strips of laminate lifted the drawer back into position and made it slide easier and stopped the wear from getting worse.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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