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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-24-2005, 10:14 PM Thread Starter
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Default New shop

I have just been given a shop. Given the parts,which I will need to reassemble. It is a 15' x 20' interior. It used to have a mansard roof but will now have 9' ceilings and gable ends. A lot easier than a mansard to put back together.

I need any advice on the following questions, if someone can help me.

I will use plywood for the floor. What cover, paint, epoxy, tile or whatever is the best to clean up wood dust from?

What type of lighting is the best?

Would it be good to put a couple of electrical outlets in the floor? I plan to put one every four feet in the walls.

I have not started rebuilding it yet. I was a carpenter for 5 years and the reframing of it will be no problem.

If anyone has any suggestions about what I might put in it or any advice I would be much appreciative.

I have been working with mesquite wood for the past year and I realize I need a good dust system. If anyone has any workshop layout plans that would help me also.

I would like to become a source for great information for this forum but just need to get started.

Jeff
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-24-2005, 11:50 PM
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In my shop I used flourescent T4 lighting on the walls at the 7 ft level, all arround with single tube fixtures. I put 2 additional 8 ft 2 bulb fixtures overhead in the center. My shop is 18 X 24 so close to the same size. I put a plug-in every 4 ft on separate breakers. No floor plugs. I wouldn't install floor plugs unless they were original equipment and installed professionally. I also have 4 overhead plugs. One at each end and 2 in the center for power feeders if you chose to add them at a later date. I always found that the best shop layout is the one that works best for you. Keep in mind that you may want to cut sheets of material or plywood etc., and leave enough room to cut end for end or across. I always make sure the dust collector is the furthest away from the most used work area for noise reduction. As mine is usually running when other equipment isn't, the noise can make you tired after a while. I also put tool storage between drill press and sanders etc. This allows more working space for the machine you are working on. You've come to the right place for help in setting up. I'm sure there are lots of members with great ideas that will be contributing. A combination of a lot of ideas may be what works best for you. Before building, I would layout my floor plan in place and walk through it and see how it feels. Good luck with your project.
Rick

Last edited by cabinetsetc; 04-24-2005 at 11:53 PM.
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-25-2005, 11:44 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the feedback. I talked to a lighting guy at Home Depot today. He was excited about helping me. What is T4? I can pick up a couple of 8" fixtures easily. I want to run all my tools on 220. Do you think it is a good idea? I will put in 110 plugs also. I will paint all the 220 orange so they are not mistaken. I was thinking of putting the actual collector outside the building in an insulated room for noise abatement.

I am building my shop with 2 x 4 walls to six feet and 2 x 6 to nine feet above. I found a good deal on track lighting and want to put that on the inch and a half I have at the 6' level so I can put the light exactly where I need it.

Yours is the only response I have so far. Do you have any suggestions about floor treatment to minimize cleanup. I will be using one and one eighth plywood that I got for free but it is in 12" 96" strips and so I will have lots of crevices.

Thanks,
Jeffbob
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-26-2005, 12:51 AM
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Hi Jeff; T4 lighting is a newer type of flourescent that uses 35-40% less power. When the hydro bill comes in every bit helps. It looks much the same as regular flourescent but the tubes are thinner. Home depot should be able to help you. I don't know where you live but I live in northern BC, Ca. If it's available here, it's available everywhere.

As far as the floor goes, I used a laminate imitation wood flooring.The lock and click type. It actually looks better than my livingroom but it was a pallet I got stuck with that I bought at a RB auction for a job that didn't pan out. I would have gone with something cheaper otherwise. But it definitely is easy to clean and vaccuum. It doesn't like water though. If you are using plywood, you can use floor patch or a floor levelling compound to fill the holes and cracks and finish with a good epoxy. It should last until you outgrow your shop.
I went with 10 ft ceilings because when you're turning a 4X8 sheet arround, 8 ft is a pain, especially if you have anything on the ceiling like a smoke detector. The thickness of your walls would depend on where you live and whether extreme heat or cold is a problem. It costs a lot less in the long run to buy thicker walls and insulation than the heating or air conditioning the building later. Try to leave room for natural light if you are spending any time in the shop. Improper lighting can make you very tired very fast.
Feeling tired and not being alert when working with any moving equipment is an extremely bad combination and something you can't change after the fact. Sorry if I ramble on this one, but I've seen many woodworkers with missing digits. In your shop safety should always be taken into consideration. BTW if you do go with any kind of easy to clean flooring, use rubber mats in front of tools such as saws and drill presses. They can be picked up at Wal-Mart very reasonably. These tiles interlock and can be any size you need.
Withthe flourescent lighting, you probably won't need the track lighting. I have no shadows in my shop. This is important to me because, as I get older, the pencil marks become harder to see.
As far as power goes, if you aren't using your shop commercially, I wouldn't worry about all tools being 220. The only 220 I use is the dust collector, the sheet sander. the compressor and an electric heater. If you have more than that on 220 you could probably use a bigger shop.
This past weekend was a beautiful one and most of the members were probably out enjoying the sun. I'm sure you will get a lot more response than just me. Surely someone that knows a lot more. I built my shop by gosh and by golly using whatever came available as it did. I'm sure someone out there has a real plan with tried and true solutions. Good luck.
Rick

Last edited by cabinetsetc; 04-26-2005 at 01:14 AM.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-26-2005, 10:54 AM
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I agree with you about wiring dual voltage machines at the higher voltage. While the power is the same the current is one half what it is at the lower voltage,so in theory you could use smaller wire,but i wouldn't advise it. By the way the 110-220vac hasn't been that for many years, the nominal voltage in most states is 240vac.

regards
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-26-2005, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrymayfield
I agree with you about wiring dual voltage machines at the higher voltage. While the power is the same the current is one half what it is at the lower voltage,so in theory you could use smaller wire,but i wouldn't advise it. By the way the 110-220vac hasn't been that for many years, the nominal voltage in most states is 240vac.

regards
jerry

Thanks for the imput. I have a friend who is a master electrician who will help me. When I was a carpenter I used 240 for my compressor and it seemed to run like a banshee. I will probably use 10 guage for all my wiring. 12/3 will work for the lights and little stuff.

It is good to see we have such helpful people on the forum.

As I mature and become more edumacated I will try to give back all I get and more.

Jeffbob
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 04-26-2005, 03:50 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetsetc
Hi Jeff; T4 lighting is a newer type of flourescent that uses 35-40% less power. When the hydro bill comes in every bit helps. It looks much the same as regular flourescent but the tubes are thinner. Home depot should be able to help you. I don't know where you live but I live in northern BC, Ca. If it's available here, it's available everywhere.

As far as the floor goes, I used a laminate imitation wood flooring.The lock and click type. It actually looks better than my livingroom but it was a pallet I got stuck with that I bought at a RB auction for a job that didn't pan out. I would have gone with something cheaper otherwise. But it definitely is easy to clean and vaccuum. It doesn't like water though. If you are using plywood, you can use floor patch or a floor levelling compound to fill the holes and cracks and finish with a good epoxy. It should last until you outgrow your shop.
I went with 10 ft ceilings because when you're turning a 4X8 sheet arround, 8 ft is a pain, especially if you have anything on the ceiling like a smoke detector. The thickness of your walls would depend on where you live and whether extreme heat or cold is a problem. It costs a lot less in the long run to buy thicker walls and insulation than the heating or air conditioning the building later. Try to leave room for natural light if you are spending any time in the shop. Improper lighting can make you very tired very fast.
Feeling tired and not being alert when working with any moving equipment is an extremely bad combination and something you can't change after the fact. Sorry if I ramble on this one, but I've seen many woodworkers with missing digits. In your shop safety should always be taken into consideration. BTW if you do go with any kind of easy to clean flooring, use rubber mats in front of tools such as saws and drill presses. They can be picked up at Wal-Mart very reasonably. These tiles interlock and can be any size you need.
Withthe flourescent lighting, you probably won't need the track lighting. I have no shadows in my shop. This is important to me because, as I get older, the pencil marks become harder to see.
As far as power goes, if you aren't using your shop commercially, I wouldn't worry about all tools being 220. The only 220 I use is the dust collector, the sheet sander. the compressor and an electric heater. If you have more than that on 220 you could probably use a bigger shop.
This past weekend was a beautiful one and most of the members were probably out enjoying the sun. I'm sure you will get a lot more response than just me. Surely someone that knows a lot more. I built my shop by gosh and by golly using whatever came available as it did. I'm sure someone out there has a real plan with tried and true solutions. Good luck.
Rick
I will look into the T4. I have a high output fixture in my utility room now. Thanks for the advice about no shadows. I did not really want to put in the trac lighting but thought it might give me more direct light to each tool.

I called a flooring expert today and he told me that Vinyl Composition Tile is the best. All the grocery stores use it. He gave me directions how to lay it. It is very easy. I can pick it up from salvage places for about 30 cents per square foot. Normal price at Home Depot is 75 cents per sq ft.

I am in Denton Texas. BC seems like a nice place to live. We have looked at Vancouver or surrounding areas for a place to retire. But being from Texas and being a Yankee, even after 26 years here, I don't know if my constitution would allow me to be a foreigner again. I don't cotton well to being called names.

I am going with 9 foot ceilings because of my height limitation per zoning. I hung exterior sheathing for years so I can handle a 8 foot sheet in that space.

Thanks for your feedback.

Jeffbob
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