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post #1 of 4 (permalink) Old 01-20-2009, 10:38 PM Thread Starter
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Arrow My first box using box joints

The post about making drawers brought this to mind.

I just made a box.......I resawed some hard maple and walnut, then ripped them to 1-1/2 inches wide. I glued them face to face. Then I resawed that.

It came out kinda like a butcher block look. The final thickness was about 5/16 thick on each board.
I remember watching the "Router Workshop" where they made some box joints using a jig on a router table. I had never done box joints before.

Yikes, this is where I'm probably gonna get in trouble, as I made my own jig

I simply put a piece of 1/2" plywood over the table and clamped it down good. I had cut a hole in it for the straight bit to come up thru.

I made the bit as high as my stock was thick............that is......my stock is 5/16, so i made it that high. In fact, I just used the stock as a reference.

Then I made a "stick".........it was as high as the bit and 1/2 inch wide. I made it that width because I was using a 1/2 inch straight bit and my box joints would then be 1/2 inches each.

I made a "spacer" block, which is nothing more than a piece of the original "stick." I put the spacer block between the bit and the stick and I screwed the stick into the plywood.

On the walnut, I started with a full box.......... and on the maple, I started with a blank space for the walnut "box" to fit in.

Once I made the first cut in each piece, it was just a matter of "hooking" the joint I had just cut over the stick. That way I had a "box" every other space.

I know this is probably getting confusing, but its too late now!

I kinda lucked out, in that I ended up with full boxes at each side of the pieces.......in other words, I didn't need to trim the wood in order to make the boxes look uniform and have them all end with a full box.

When I was done running all the pieces thru.........they fit like a glove. I must have set the bit just a tad high, because I had boxes portruding out from each other by just a hair. My sander took that down with little effort and they were nice and smooth.

Then I simply glued the top and the bottom to the assembled (and glued up) sides of the box. when the glue was dry, I put a flush trim bit with a top bearing into the router table. I just routed around the box on both top and bottom pieces, and voila....a BOX with BOX joints!!

I figured out where I wanted the lid to be and I simply set my fence on the TS and cut the top off.

My first box. I must say that it took a several woodworking techniques to make this box.......very good practice.

Oh, almost forgot..........I am getting ready to make some base cabinets for my family room, one on each side of the fireplace. They will have drawers. After this box-making project, I am thinking about using box joints on the drawers.

Anyone see a problem using these joints for drawers?

Thanks for letting me share,
Scott

Last edited by Slinking; 01-20-2009 at 10:52 PM. Reason: my laptop sends with no warning
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post #2 of 4 (permalink) Old 01-21-2009, 10:45 AM
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Scott, a drawer is just a box without a top. Why not?

George
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post #3 of 4 (permalink) Old 01-21-2009, 01:34 PM
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Hi, Scott. See my comment in the drawer thread:

http://www.routerforums.com/96855-post14.html

Box joints on the drawers might work fine, depending on the weight of the drawer contents and whatever slide mechanism you might have in mind. The box joint would be considerably stronger than a plain rabbet joint because of the increased glue surface.

A potentially more important question is whether you'll be happy with the aesthetics of the drawers ten years from now. Dovetailed drawers never go out of style.

- Ralph
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post #4 of 4 (permalink) Old 01-21-2009, 02:20 PM
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Hi Scott

All I can say if it's worth doing it's worth doing it right.

Take a small trip to HD/Lowes and take a look at the kitchen cabinets they have on the floor, pull the drawers of some of them, you will see some with rabbit joints and with 4 or so staples and some glue holding them together in the joints,then look at some more they will have dovetail joints, then check the price ... many of the cabinets are the low end and some are realy on the low end...the staples ones..the ones with the rabbit joints and staples will fail in short order...the ones with the dovetails will last a bit longer but will also fail becasue of the PB/plywood they use to make the drawers..

So to say again if it worth doing it must be worth doing it right..the drawers guides are big deal,,,,you can use the cheap ones and they are fine most of the time but if you want the drawer to last a lone time get the better ones that will self close when you push them in ,that the kids/anyone can't push in and brake the glue joints..






Quote:
Originally Posted by Slinking View Post
The post about making drawers brought this to mind.

I just made a box.......I resawed some hard maple and walnut, then ripped them to 1-1/2 inches wide. I glued them face to face. Then I resawed that.

It came out kinda like a butcher block look. The final thickness was about 5/16 thick on each board.
I remember watching the "Router Workshop" where they made some box joints using a jig on a router table. I had never done box joints before.

Yikes, this is where I'm probably gonna get in trouble, as I made my own jig

I simply put a piece of 1/2" plywood over the table and clamped it down good. I had cut a hole in it for the straight bit to come up thru.

I made the bit as high as my stock was thick............that is......my stock is 5/16, so i made it that high. In fact, I just used the stock as a reference.

Then I made a "stick".........it was as high as the bit and 1/2 inch wide. I made it that width because I was using a 1/2 inch straight bit and my box joints would then be 1/2 inches each.

I made a "spacer" block, which is nothing more than a piece of the original "stick." I put the spacer block between the bit and the stick and I screwed the stick into the plywood.

On the walnut, I started with a full box.......... and on the maple, I started with a blank space for the walnut "box" to fit in.

Once I made the first cut in each piece, it was just a matter of "hooking" the joint I had just cut over the stick. That way I had a "box" every other space.

I know this is probably getting confusing, but its too late now!

I kinda lucked out, in that I ended up with full boxes at each side of the pieces.......in other words, I didn't need to trim the wood in order to make the boxes look uniform and have them all end with a full box.

When I was done running all the pieces thru.........they fit like a glove. I must have set the bit just a tad high, because I had boxes portruding out from each other by just a hair. My sander took that down with little effort and they were nice and smooth.

Then I simply glued the top and the bottom to the assembled (and glued up) sides of the box. when the glue was dry, I put a flush trim bit with a top bearing into the router table. I just routed around the box on both top and bottom pieces, and voila....a BOX with BOX joints!!

I figured out where I wanted the lid to be and I simply set my fence on the TS and cut the top off.

My first box. I must say that it took a several woodworking techniques to make this box.......very good practice.

Oh, almost forgot..........I am getting ready to make some base cabinets for my family room, one on each side of the fireplace. They will have drawers. After this box-making project, I am thinking about using box joints on the drawers.

Anyone see a problem using these joints for drawers?

Thanks for letting me share,
Scott



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