Dust Collection bargain returns - Page 3 - Router Forums
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post #21 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-04-2017, 09:17 PM
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The Grizzly work and bolts right on the HF, I prefer it over the Wynn by a pretty big margin. Even if the specification on the Wynn were 10 times better and they are not, the dust during cleaning the Wynn is so messy that the Wynn just isn't better overall. I breathed in more dust cleaning the Wynn filter even with a mask then I breathed in using a canister with a handle in 10 years. These canisters just have to have some sort of cleaning device like a slide or paddle and until the Wynn does I cant support them and I want to I like the filter itself.

This is one I highly recommend for the HF:

https://www.amazon.com/Grizzly-H5783...JHYXP6KT4FX3YK

I'll find the other unit and post the link.

Last edited by dovetail_65; 09-04-2017 at 09:19 PM.
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post #22 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-07-2017, 01:28 AM
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Just for reference, several more knowledgeable than me recommend blowing the filters out, rather than removing them and such.

TOO, I have found I have to shake both my big Jets (four bag/two bag and two filter), my little 1-1/2 hp Jet and my HF collector after knocking the canisters or bags clean. Otherwise, the dust falls down, lands on the plate between the filters and the collection bags, then is all drawn back up the next time I start the unit. After I started shaking the beasts, I noted a vast improvement from cleaning.
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post #23 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-07-2017, 10:25 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the "shaken not stirred" hint Kelly. Makes sense to me. If you take the bag off, you and your lungs will be coated in fine sawdust, even if you're standing upwind. You want to contain the hazard.

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post #24 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-07-2017, 11:58 AM
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Quote:
The instructions were vague, incomplete, and often just plain incorrect.
I have noticed over the years that foreign countries write their instructions in poor English or hard to understand English.
Case in point- A charcoal grill made in China had a warning label on the lid- "Watch children and pets while burning."
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post #25 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-07-2017, 02:25 PM Thread Starter
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I have noticed over the years that foreign countries write their instructions in poor English or hard to understand English.
Case in point- A charcoal grill made in China had a warning label on the lid- "Watch children and pets while burning."
I don't know about you but I like my children roasted to a nice maple color.

I do a lot of writing for a living and one of the most difficult things to do is to say exacly what you mean, and in a way that an ordinary person can comprehend, follow and make use of the information. Getting words to do that is like wrestling a snake, you get the head under control and the other end is wagging loose, breaking your ribs.

Sometimes it takes my half an hour to write a post that describes a process. And even then, I often come back and rework it after another hour or so. But then, you guys and gals are worth the effort.
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post #26 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-07-2017, 05:32 PM
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I don't know about you but I like my children roasted to a nice maple color.

I do a lot of writing for a living and one of the most difficult things to do is to say exacly what you mean, and in a way that an ordinary person can comprehend, follow and make use of the information. Getting words to do that is like wrestling a snake, you get the head under control and the other end is wagging loose, breaking your ribs.

Sometimes it takes my half an hour to write a post that describes a process. And even then, I often come back and rework it after another hour or so. But then, you guys and gals are worth the effort.
I started my 30+ year career as a tech writer by re-writing instructions and specifications written in "Japlish." That's what we called the written in Japanese, translated in Japan english version. It was pretty amazing the stuff the engineers left out when describing procedures.
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post #27 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-07-2017, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
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I started my 30+ year career as a tech writer by re-writing instructions and specifications written in "Japlish." That's what we called the written in Japanese, translated in Japan english version. It was pretty amazing the stuff the engineers left out when describing procedures.
@CharlesWebster I think it's called Chinglish these days. Your point about what they leave out is really often the biggest problem. I think sometimes the parts lists are set in type, then someone substitutes another part, but there's no update to the instructions. Happily, the assembly of the DC is almost intuitive. Start with the base, then the motor mount and assembly, then to bag holding assembly..
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Last edited by DesertRatTom; 09-07-2017 at 07:34 PM.
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post #28 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-07-2017, 09:13 PM
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Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
I don't know about you but I like my children roasted to a nice maple color.

I do a lot of writing for a living and one of the most difficult things to do is to say exacly what you mean, and in a way that an ordinary person can comprehend, follow and make use of the information. Getting words to do that is like wrestling a snake, you get the head under control and the other end is wagging loose, breaking your ribs.

Sometimes it takes my half an hour to write a post that describes a process. And even then, I often come back and rework it after another hour or so. But then, you guys and gals are worth the effort.
I was once told be an older gentleman (at least older than me)
"When dealing with adults one must make it child proof".
I understand, when you say you proof read then modify what you have written. With me, it sometimes takes three or four proof readings and changes to have what is in my mind understood by others. I use to write process training manuals for manufacturing companies.
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post #29 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-07-2017, 11:16 PM
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The remote control for the DC system arrived today. A $13 wireless controller and 2 $7 remote controls. I can now start the DC system from every tool to which it's connected. For $27!

We'll see how long it lasts...
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post #30 of 45 (permalink) Old 09-10-2017, 10:16 PM
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I should have gotten one of these before starting my current project, lots of sweeping and vacuuming. One thing I wondered is how they might handle lacquer overspray? I normally build a tent in the shop out of thin painters plastic, but inevitably lacquer dust gets out and coats everything. Would a dust unit help remove this, or would it just get gummed up (the lacquer dust is pretty dry, but still slightly tacky)?

Is it snow yet?
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