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post #71 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-10-2017, 12:17 PM
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Seeing how I use a hose to a dust collector anyhow cutting an electric cord does little for me personally, I dont notice the electric cord now.
Good point . I normaly use the hose anyways , so what's an additional cord ?

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post #72 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-10-2017, 12:31 PM
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Good point . I normaly use the hose anyways , so what's an additional cord ?

And since my dust collection hose and electric cord are one unit I would just have the end to the electric cord at the tool end flopping in the wind anyhow.

All my dust collection hose have a sleeve the electric cord is in and all the tools I own from Makita Track saw to DeWalt routers have been converted to Festool plug it ends. It takes me only two seconds to switch dust collection hose and electric for any tool.
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post #73 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-10-2017, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
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And since my dust collection hose and electric cord are one unit I would just have the end to the electric cord at the tool end flopping in the wind anyhow.

All my dust collection hose have a sleeve the electric cord is in and all the tools I own from Makita Track saw to DeWalt routers have been converted to Festool plug it ends. It takes me only two seconds to switch dust collection hose and electric for any tool.
The cordless versions would benefit contractors working on site. It eliminates the need to drag around a generator.

I'm not sure how useful it would be for home users.
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post #74 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-10-2017, 02:29 PM
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The cordless versions would benefit contractors working on site. It eliminates the need to drag around a generator.

I'm not sure how useful it would be for home users.
so w/ short battery time...
how many batteries will you need....
how will you charge the batteries on site...
you need a gerator anywats for all the other stuff but temp power should have the 1st to put in ...

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post #75 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-10-2017, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
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so w/ short battery time...
how many batteries will you need....
how will you charge the batteries on site...
you need a gerator anywats for all the other stuff but temp power should have the 1st to put in ...
Dewalt has the only viable onsite cordless tracksaw. They use a 60V platform that will last the whole day with two packs and 800 board feet cutting on 2 batteries.

Both Makita and Festool are only offering 110 Board feet (real world usage) on two 18 Volt batteries.

The bigger problem with most of these tools are not the performance but the cost of 5.0 amp batteries replacements.

Spending $300 - $400 for battery replacements every 4-5 years is just plain ridiculous.

I'm hoping Makita will release a newer version of their corded track saw with a riving knife, splinter gaurd and improved track adjustment knobs and a swivel dust port.

With those improvements, there would be no reason for anyone to buy the Festool version unless they have a Festool package.

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post #76 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 06:17 PM Thread Starter
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After doing my homework over the last few weeks, I'm leaning on biting the bullet and saving the extra pennies to buy the Festool TS 75. I'm by no means a Green Koolaid drinker. Makita's weak links are the lack of a riving knife and their poorly reviewed tracks. Makita also has a very limited number of blade options and track options.

The second you have to buy the Festool track, you pretty much eliminate the cost savings from buying Makita's SP6000. The TS 75 can handle anything you throw at it. It can handle those demanding countertop cuts.
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post #77 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 06:31 PM
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After doing my homework over the last few weeks, I'm leaning on biting the bullet and saving the extra pennies to buy the Festool TS 75. I'm by no means a Green Koolaid drinker. Makita's weak links are the lack of a riving knife and their poorly reviewed tracks. Makita also has a very limited number of blade options and track options.

The second you have to buy the Festool track, you pretty much eliminate the cost savings from buying Makita's SP6000. The TS 75 can handle anything you throw at it. It can handle those demanding countertop cuts.
I have the TS75 , and am super impressed with it . I have never owned one prior to this , so I can't compare . Wish I had known about them before , as I would have gone with a smaller table saw .
I also would have gone with FesTools ts55 version , had I not heard about the lack of power.

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post #78 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 07:14 PM
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Even if the Makita cost the SAME price as the Festool TS55 the Makita is still better, the cost saving is just a bonus.

Anyone not buying a TS 75 or Mafell set up may as well get the Makita, with Festool rails. Now if you have a Festool router and got a Track deal with that it's even a better deal getting the Makita as you dont need get the tracks.

Heck, I have a few and actually bought a refurb Makita for 283.00 with real case and blade. The refurbs appeared to be brand new and I bought them from Amazon Warehouse. It eats a Festool TS 55 for breakfast without a riving knife, it doesn't need one. Only the Festool track saw exhibit that weird want to jump the track binding issue,never had that with my Makita.

The Festool tracks get bad reviews as well, only the Mafell and Bosch tracks seem to have any kind of decent review, especially for joining two tracks together. Still, neither the Makita for Festool rails have ever given me personally an issue except one long 8 foot Festool track.

I get to put the bad track saws and the 8 foot Festool track so curved it was like cutting around a corner all behind me anyhow. I am up for a shop renovation and all the Mafell tools are approved by the big boss as well as a Laguna 5'x10 or 6'x13' CNC machine(still thinking on it) and a 50" drum sander, my mouth is watering in anticipation! And yes its a brag, but one 30 years in the making.

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post #79 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-11-2017, 10:14 PM Thread Starter
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Even if the Makita cost the SAME price as the Festool TS55 the Makita is still better, the cost saving is just a bonus.

Anyone not buying a TS 75 or Mafell set up may as well get the Makita, with Festool rails. Now if you have a Festool router and got a Track deal with that it's even a better deal getting the Makita as you dont need get the tracks.

Heck, I have a few and actually bought a refurb Makita for 283.00 with real case and blade. The refurbs appeared to be brand new and I bought them from Amazon Warehouse. It eats a Festool TS 55 for breakfast without a riving knife, it doesn't need one. Only the Festool track saw exhibit that weird want to jump the track binding issue,never had that with my Makita.

The Festool tracks get bad reviews as well, only the Mafell and Bosch tracks seem to have any kind of decent review, especially for joining two tracks together. Still, neither the Makita for Festool rails have ever given me personally an issue except one long 8 foot Festool track.

I get to put the bad track saws and the 8 foot Festool track so curved it was like cutting around a corner all behind me anyhow. I am up for a shop renovation and all the Mafell tools are approved by the big boss as well as a Laguna 5'x10 or 6'x13' CNC machine(still thinking on it) and a 50" drum sander, my mouth is watering in anticipation! And yes its a brag, but one 30 years in the making.
You're living in the US, you have the bonus of getting things cheaper and having a wide variety of used tracks saws to pick from.

Used track saws are sparse and we pay $100 - $150 more dollars to purchase the same saws.

The SP6000 is $499 with a 55 Inch track at Busy Bee tools. It's very hard to find the SP6000 as a standalone unit a fair price.

Riving knifes are a life saver cutting hardwoods. With the exception of MDF, it's very rare for plywood sheets to bind the blade.

I would never even consider the Festool TS 55. There's only $100 dollar difference between the TS55 and TS75. There's no reason to buy the underpowered TS55.

The track lock for bevels is nice. It's a easy as using both hands to hold the saw when cutting bevels. Bevel cuts are pretty rare.

If you're bevel cutting a 1 and a 1/2 inch price of hardwood, I would never consider using a track saw to bevel cut a without a riving knife.

If you compare the Makita and the TS 75 on softwood and hardwood plywood & sheet goods. The comparison gets much harder. With an Infinity Blade the Makita should hold it's own against the TS 75.

With cutting sheet goods.

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post #80 of 175 (permalink) Old 09-13-2017, 03:39 PM
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OK, maybe I should wade in with a British por-user perspective (or I'm a bit sceptical about a few of the points raised here). I've been a track saw user for 17 or 18 years having started out with a Hilti WSC255 and progressed to a Festool TS55 and TS75. I've used the Makita and Mafell, too

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The reason I sold the TS 75 is it's just to big and heavy for my weak hands, even on a track. And I dont cut hardwoods on a track. From my perspective I dont get the large track saw, as anything the TS 75 can do I can do better using another tool. BUT, I work in a shop not on a job-site.
Try trimming a 60 or 70mm thick solid oak door or a similar thickness fire door (not an uncommon task on refurbs in older office blocks, hospitals, public buildings, etc) where the floor level may have changed (tiles instead of vinyl, etc) and you'd soon "get" the TS75. For specific uses on site they can be very handy, but TBH mine stays in the van most of the time

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I wanted the 55 as I thought the 75 was a bit large and cumbersome, but after reading reviews about the weak arse motors in the 55 , I settled on the 75 .
Sounds like you've been watching "Mr. Skokum's" videos, but here's the rub: I've been running a TS55 for about 6 or 7 years, now - enough time to got through about 15 new blades and some 40 to 50 sharpenings - and that "weak arsed" motor hasn't failed yet. I am on my third replacement base, though, with a fourth one due (the result of running off the end of the rails). That experience of reliability and durability is far from being a one-off, either. What I would appreciate from Festool is a bit more torque/power, although I do find the TS55 to be sensitive to how sharp the blade is.

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A lot word working magazines needs redo their tests to include the newest version of the Triton. I would hold it's own against the Festool 55.
In a trade environment? I'll wait and see

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The vast majority of hobbyist wood workers would be wasting their money on the Festool track saws. Festool track saws are designed for people using them for contract or production work.
I can't disagree with you there. One big plus of the Festools ], though, is that they have excellent dust extraction - but saws like this do need to be used with a good extractor and those cost as much as the saws themselves over here

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Even if the Makita cost the SAME price as the Festool TS55 the Makita is still better, the cost saving is just a bonus.
Not sure how you work that one out. The Makita base is longer than the Festool - a minor point, but can be significant when cutting-down some sheet stocks which require a non-plunge cut to be made (e.g. materials such as Trespa - an HPL). Another thing I will say is that the Festool guide rails are anodised - Makita ones aren't (a big disadvantage for kit stored on site and in vans). I'd say the biggest difference between the two is that the Festool certainly has a better fit and finish, slightly better dust extraction and the Plug-It cord is far from a gimmick in environments where a vacuum may be shared between several tools as is common om many sites. Even so, had money been a bit tighter when I bought my Fes I'd have got a Mak and been almost as happy

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so w/ short battery time...
how many batteries will you need....
how will you charge the batteries on site...
you need a gerator anywats for all the other stuff but temp power should have the 1st to put in ...
In the real world you often don't get temporary power where or when you want it, also some projects require rapid moives between different points in a building or complex, so there is a point to having a cordless rail saw for some workers. Not enough batteries? Then buy more! My Makita site kit has 12 batteries in it, mainly 5Ah. I rarely drain the lot in a day, but I always have one or two in reserve at the end of a day

The usefulness of a rail saw comes out when you are faced tasks such as making-up and installing 3 dozen individual MDF or plywood pipe boxings in bathrooms which are all different (because you don't need to plane-in any edges, just sand) or where, like we did recently, you spend 3 weeks of your life trimming-in 250 slatted oak ceiling panels round three sides to get them to fit in a mis-shapen Victorian church roof (we were converting it into a library). As an installation tool plunge/rail saws are absolutely brilliant - as a workshop tool I think I could do better with many other tools

Last edited by Job and Knock; 09-13-2017 at 03:48 PM.
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