Brads vs Forstner - Router Forums
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post #1 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 08:05 AM Thread Starter
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Default Brads vs Forstner

If I want to drill lets say a 3/4Ē hole on a piece of plywood which one is better to use, a Brad Point bit or a Forstner bit?

Basically I donít know the difference between them, they both do the same job?

Thank you
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post #2 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 09:01 AM
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Hi Nicolas. I'm guessing that, because of the size (3/4") a brad point bit is what we'd call a spade bit over here. A flat bladed bit with a long pointed tine? If so, you could use it but it won't give you the kind of clean edged, flat bottomed hole you get with a Forstner or sawtooth bit. Are you drilling completely through the ply? If so, you might want to consider a regular hole saw and drill partly through from each side to avoid tearout. I don't like using my Forstners on ply because of the glue used in ply construction which can dull the bits.

Pete
I've cut it twice and it's still too short! But only at one end.
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post #3 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 09:43 AM
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HI nzgeordie

In the states a brad point bit is not the same as a spade bit not the same animal ,,,I will say they are hard to find in the big sizes, then the Forstner bit must take over the job...the brad point bits put in a flat bottom hole for the smaller holes the norm..

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...r=brad%20point


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Originally Posted by nzgeordie View Post
Hi Nicolas. I'm guessing that, because of the size (3/4") a brad point bit is what we'd call a spade bit over here. A flat bladed bit with a long pointed tine? If so, you could use it but it won't give you the kind of clean edged, flat bottomed hole you get with a Forstner or sawtooth bit. Are you drilling completely through the ply? If so, you might want to consider a regular hole saw and drill partly through from each side to avoid tearout. I don't like using my Forstners on ply because of the glue used in ply construction which can dull the bits.



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post #4 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 01:23 PM Thread Starter
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Bobj3 I try to understand if there is a difference between the two. They both make flat bottom holes and they both have a sharp point to start a hole however only the Forstner comes in large sizes.

So if you want to drill a hole and the size is available in both Brad and Forstner which one would you pick? Does it depend on the wood type or it is just a matter or preference?

Thank you
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post #5 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 02:09 PM
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Nicolas,
Maybe a picture will help explain the difference between a forstner and a brad point bit. They are the same only in the respect that they are both drill bits and that's where the similarity ends. The brad point is on the left and the forstner is on the right. As you can see they are nothing alike.
If I wanted to drill a 3/4" hole and I had a forstner and a brad point 3/4" bit, it would depend on the type of hole I wanted. If a through hole I would use the 3/4" brad point. But, if I wanted to drill a 3/4" flat bottomed hole that doesn't go all the way through, I would use the forstner.
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post #6 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 02:10 PM
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HI kolias

To me it's how deep I must go, the Forstner bit is not made to go to deep..you can cook a Forstner bit in a heart beat if you push it to deep and it gets hot..unlike the brad point bits, they are made to drill just like a normal drill bit..many like to use them to put in pockets holes on aprons..if you look under some furinture you will see them in place..holding the tops down or others parts..(corner brackets/brace the norm)
They are almost self starting you could say..because of the brad point...that's why they work well on angles unlike the normal drill bit or Forstner bit.

I will say the brad points like to break off easy so you must use them with care
They also make 3 kinds of brad point drill bits...the one George posted is called flat bottom type..


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Originally Posted by kolias View Post
Bobj3 I try to understand if there is a difference between the two. They both make flat bottom holes and they both have a sharp point to start a hole however only the Forstner comes in large sizes.

So if you want to drill a hole and the size is available in both Brad and Forstner which one would you pick? Does it depend on the wood type or it is just a matter or preference?

Thank you



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Last edited by bobj3; 02-03-2009 at 02:28 PM.
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post #7 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 03:38 PM
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Phew Talk about nations divided by a common language OK ...now I've seen the photos, a brad point bit is what we call a lip and spur bit over here. Thanks Bj.

Pete
I've cut it twice and it's still too short! But only at one end.
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post #8 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 03:43 PM
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HI Pete

This what we call a spade bit in the states

" common language " I would be lost in your hardware store I think

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Wood-...3697248&sr=1-6


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Last edited by bobj3; 02-03-2009 at 04:46 PM.
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post #9 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 04:13 PM Thread Starter
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Very happy to know the difference

Thank you
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post #10 of 26 (permalink) Old 02-03-2009, 08:45 PM
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One other thing should help to clarify when to use which bit, and that is the size. For the most part brad point bits are 1/2" and smaller. Forstner bits start at 1/4" and get larger, but for the most part they are used when your hole is over 1/2" diameter. Both are designed to give a cleaner cut than you would get with a traditional drill bit. Spade bits are sometimes called paddle bits and are usually flat with spurs in the center and on the outside edges. Spade bits are most often used for rough construction due to their poor quality of cut and low cost. There is one other major type of drill bit and that is commonly used, the auger bit. Auger bits are most often used to drill through thicker materials quickly. Using a hole saw on composite materials is a good idea, they cost less than drills in larger sizes but are limited in the depth of cut.

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