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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-11-2009, 09:05 AM Thread Starter
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Default Craftsman Contractor Table Saw

I recently bought one of the digital, magnetized, angle indicators. The first thing I did was align the blade on my table saw. It was 0.5 degrees out. Great little tool.

My question is, does the rip fence need to be a 90 degrees also, because it's 0.3 degrees off? My thought is it just needs to be exactly parallel to the blade. Am I correct in this belief? I cannot find anywhere to adjust it to 90 degrees from the table top.

Thanks in advance


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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-11-2009, 10:11 AM
 
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Yes, the fence should be parallel to the blade. If it isn't, you risk pinching your material and causining a kickback.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-11-2009, 03:20 PM
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Yes, the fence should be adjustable.
The other thing to check is that the miter groves are also parallel to the blade. This also should be adjustable. This should be checked & adjusted first. Check with sears of look online.
Safety is, of course, a great concern here, but accurate cuts are important also.

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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-12-2009, 03:40 PM
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I read this thread last night and it got me wondering about my TS, I have a 3hp Delta 10" LHT Arbor saw. I hear a slight ring as material passes the end of the blade. Knowing this means that either the blade, the fence or both are "OOP", (out of Parallel).
I never relied on the saws 90 and 45 gauge always using machinist and combo squares for absolutes. I haven't checked anything since I put it all together 6 yrs ago. I don't go out of my way to baby my tools, but I don't mistreat them either, they're important to my work. So I decided to pull out the dial indicator and do some snooping. I wonder if they make a dial indicator to run on a T track?

Ignorance Is Bliss! I almost swallowed my tongue at 1st, over .006 at infeed, so I pulled the stabilizer off and tested again, well over .003 so I pulled the blade and put a new Tenru in. Much better .002. I wonder if the stabilizer can warp a thin cerf blade?
I slid it to the outfeed end of the blade and started out at .001. Not perfect but not too bad and not worth trying to make it worse.

Then I went to check the fence, (Biesemeyer) from the track, infeed -0- outfeed .010 Oy Gevalt! I then measured from the rail to the tabletop and noted an 1/8" difference. I ripped 2 blocks at 3/4" loosened the rail plopped them in, retightened and rechecked. Still .010 out but reversed. Removed one block ripped it down to 11/16" now out .001. Loosened it up one more time, slid paper beside the block, retightened and measured at -0-.

I also learned that the fence has a whoops in it. About 20" through the middle of the fence is curved nearly .002 away from the blade. I can easily slide a sheet of paper between the straight edge and at the worst, at the center of the blade 2 sheets. Maybe I can slide some paper between the fence tube and fence

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-12-2009, 03:48 PM
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When checking the miter track for parallel to the blade, put a mark on the blade and make your measurements at that mark.
I screw a dial indicator to a block of scrap wood and clamp that to the miter gauge. Cheaper than buying one of those miter track gauge holders.

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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-12-2009, 05:20 PM
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Hi,

The blade NEEDS to be parallel to the miter slots. The fence parallel to the blade.

BTW, craftsman TS miter slots aren't exactly "true" either. Check them with a dial caliper.

Ken

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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-12-2009, 08:01 PM
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AxlMyk
I dropped a piece of 3/4" snug mahogany into the track, slid the magnetic base up to it and locked it down for the meas., then repeated at the out feed end.

The thing with this model is the instructions require you to loosen 4 bolts to free the table from the cabinet and then try to move the table. In my case .001 doesn't seem worth it. If it were more than .002 and or toward the fence I might give it a stab.

Something I may have tricked into, not sure. I was wondering how much of my hand attributed to the run out, (with a belt drive) I noticed that when the blade free spun back from a pull the run out wasn't as high. I cut about 12" of string, tied a loop in one end and hooked the teeth of the blade to pull it. This time the run out remained a smidge below .002, wish I had digital

This lead me to wonder how much of the blade, (new or not) may be out.
I Marked -0- "A", turned the blade and marked "B" when it reached .001 and "C" when it peaked and again when it dropped below, what I discovered is that the peak area is less than 10% of the circumference and between 2 expansion slots.

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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-12-2009, 08:05 PM
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Is any of this effecting your woodworking? The numbers you are giving are very small and the wood moves way more than that everyday. .002, that's almost metal working tolerance isn't it?
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-12-2009, 08:08 PM
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Is any of this effecting your woodworking?

The numbers you are giving are very small and the wood moves way more than that everyday.

1/64 is .015625

1/128 is .0078125

I think you are good at .002?
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-12-2009, 08:49 PM
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OH me too! Once I got the fence moved back to -0-. The fence was .010 toward the track, the blade is .001 toward the track making it a .009 squeeze at the outfeed. It roughs up a smooth cut.

I don't have a problem with the outfeed being .001 wider than the infeed. I think, (no absolute proof) the thicker the material is the less influence blade run out has on it, (affecting 3/4" much more than 1 1/2").

I always have an issue with whatever I do, there's always something that bugs me and could be better even when no one else can see it. I still go back and look at houses, decks and furniture etc., I framed 20 plus years ago to see how they fair.

Refering to error creep, an old framing axiom, If you start out at level square and plumb it's easier to maintain level, square and plumb and when the house is finished it's likely to be closer to level square and plumb than if you didn't.

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