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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-20-2009, 08:46 PM Thread Starter
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Default Woodworking at it's roots

Tonight I did something a little different and sat in front of the TV with the wife for a spell. We flipped channels looking for something to watch and landed on the PBS station which was showing a film named "Alone in the wildnerness" While having seen a few discussions of this film on other forums, I never really had the opportunity to watch it until now.

It is no secret that I am a neander hand tool fanatic which really made me appreciate this show even more. This guy makes the rest of us look like mere beginners at any skill level. I highly recommend this film to anyone. Not only are this guy's woodworking skills to be admired, but the scenery in the film setting of Alaska is beyond compare. I think you will enjoy this one.

I found parts of it on YouTube at this link. You can follow the YouTube links for even more and possibly get the entire movie from there.

YouTube - Alone in the Wilderness

Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-20-2009, 08:59 PM
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Hi Bob

That's a real good show ,, I saw it about 2 years ago...I like the way he made his door ...and the hinges for it...

Takes guts to be out in open like he was..


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Tonight I did something a little different and sat in front of the TV with the wife for a spell. We flipped channels looking for something to watch and landed on the PBS station which was showing a film named "Alone in the wildnerness" While having seen a few discussions of this film on other forums, I never really had the opportunity to watch it until now.

It is no secret that I am a neander hand tool fanatic which really made me appreciate this show even more. This guy makes the rest of us look like mere beginners at any skill level. I highly recommend this film to anyone. Not only are this guy's woodworking skills to be admired, but the scenery in the film setting of Alaska is beyond compare. I think you will enjoy this one.

I found parts of it on YouTube at this link. You can follow the YouTube links for even more and possibly get the entire movie from there.

YouTube - Alone in the Wilderness

Hope you enjoy it as much as I did.



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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-20-2009, 09:52 PM
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Yes, that's a great show. I've watched it a couple of times on PBS. One has to admire his fortitude.

As I understand, somewhere in his 70s, he "wimped out" and moved to the city.

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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-21-2009, 08:29 AM
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That film sounds great Bob, I'll watch it as soon as I have time, but tell me Bob, who's wife were you watching it with?

"sat in front of the TV with THE wife "

Harry



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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-30-2009, 05:37 PM
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Harry's got a dirty mind....

But now that he's asked it...... hehe

I love the smell of sawdust in the morning.....
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-30-2009, 06:06 PM Thread Starter
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-15-2018, 04:11 PM
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The Alone in the Wilderness doesn't get the story
completely right.

Get the book that goes with the video. Richard didn't spend
30+ years out there alone. (1) there was a hunting camp
across the lake from him, (2) hikers would pass by frequently
(and dump their trash, which really pissed him off), (3) his
brother and others would come in and stay for long visits,
etc. You can tell that sometimes there's another person
doing the filming.

The video makes it sound that he wintered over all those years.
He didn't. He only spent ONE winter and then he'd just come
in for the good times.

Carefully omitted was the fact that he was always packing heat.
He's up there in bear country and you never set foot outside
without serious firepower.

It's a great video and it's often shown during PBS fund raising
week. The talking heads contribute to getting the story wrong.

That said, it's a great video. I have it and the book.


Read the book. One Man's Wilderness ISBN 978-088240513-1
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-15-2018, 04:34 PM
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Welcome Davy. Thanks for the extra info. It’s been 9 years since this thread was active but some members might still be interested in it. I live on the edge of a fair sized wildernesses area here in south central BC so I personally find these type films interesting b
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-15-2018, 08:52 PM
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Hi Davy, you must have been reading past threads. A lot of good stuff in those old posts. Hope you stick around to learn more.

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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-15-2018, 09:34 PM
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When I was a kid my step-grandfather designed a log cabin, probably around 25 X 30 feet. Only power tool used was a 2-man crosscut saw. And if you don't believe that is a power saw you have obviously never used one. I believe it was four adults working, and it was up in something less than a full week, three days keep sticking in my mind. And nothing was pre-fitted. Easy peasy, he had a stack of logs on hand, a concrete slab had been poured earlier, and we brought a stack of rough 2X12s. All the logs were crooked. So what they did was put down 2X12s along the outside edge, 2X12s upright as framing at 4 foot apart. The logs were cut into 4 foot sections, laid between the framing, spiked in. Went much faster than a conventional log cabin, with considerable less labor. Window and door holes were cut in as they went along. Then the roof was framed, felted, and shingles, then the log sealing was applied. Later was painted with linseed oil. Didn't get electric until some time later, propane for cooking and heating, and a outhouse. Too many stones in the soil to drill a well, so we brought water. Interior, cement floor, small corner room for an indoor loo, only used when absolute necessity required. Four double bunk beds, made using pole pines. Couple of couches, table, chairs, later a fridge that I think dated from way before WWII, with a large coil on top, but it worked just fine. Five acres of wooded land. Some good times there. It replaced the cabin made from pallets, and put up in one day, and tar papered the next.

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