Band saw guide blocks - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-28-2009, 08:31 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
AxlMyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 3,165
   
Default Band saw guide blocks

Instead of getting cool blocks or ceramic guides, I have read about using hardwood blocks that you make yourself. Cheap is good.
I have also read about people soaking those wood blocks in mineral oil and microwaving them. OK, the oil is for lubrication, but why the MW?

.
Never, under any circumstances, combine a sleeping pill and a laxative on the same night.

Mike - Retired FoMoCo Tradesman
My Gallery @ http://www.routerforums.com/axlmyks-stuff/
AxlMyk is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-28-2009, 09:03 PM
Retired Moderator
 
Bob N's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Bob
Posts: 5,688
     
Default

Mike,

This is one of those trick questions... Right?
Bob N is offline  
post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-28-2009, 09:19 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
AxlMyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 3,165
   
Default

Nope.
I've also read that soaking the wood blocks in WD-40 works also.
Woodworking: Hardwood Bandsaw Guide Blocks - In the Woodshop

.
Never, under any circumstances, combine a sleeping pill and a laxative on the same night.

Mike - Retired FoMoCo Tradesman
My Gallery @ http://www.routerforums.com/axlmyks-stuff/
AxlMyk is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-28-2009, 09:27 PM
Retired Moderator
 
Bob N's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Bob
Posts: 5,688
     
Default

That is some interesting info Mike. I am curious about the microwave part though.

I have rollers on my BS, but I think the blocks are a better option in the long run, especially with the smaller blades.
Bob N is offline  
post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-29-2009, 11:43 AM
GBM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Greg
Posts: 93
 
Default

I think they are using them like Croutons in their salad...or Bacon crumbs....

WD 40 is not a lubricant.... better to use something that is.
If you look at the torque tables... putting WD40 onto threads requires that the torque meter reading be increased in order to get the same pull down on the item being bolted down. I know that seems wrong.... but the engineers actually measure those things. When you put a lubricant on threads ( the standard is lightly oiled ) the torque required either stays the same ( if the substance is equivalent to oil ) or is reduced if it is slicker than standard oil in lubricating properties.
I think a naturally oily wood should be used.... lignum vitae, etc...and then oiled in addition.
GBM is offline  
post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-29-2009, 11:59 AM
Registered User
 
Ralph Barker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Ralph
Posts: 2,001
 
Default

My guess is that "nuking" the wooden blocks might "case-harden" them, that is to say, the cellular structure of the wood fiber is hardened and almost all moisture removed. The moisture could then replaced by the oil soak.

- Ralph
Ralph Barker is offline  
post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-29-2009, 01:24 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
AxlMyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 3,165
   
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GBM View Post
WD 40 is not a lubricant.... better to use something that is.
If you look at the torque tables... putting WD40 onto threads requires that the torque meter reading be increased in order to get the same pull down on the item being bolted down.
The WD-40 is to soak the blocks in, not the threads.

I made a few blocks out of walnut and put the ends in a small cap I sprayed WD-40 into. They soaked it up like a wick. I installed them on the saw and adjusted them right up to the blade. With the saw running I adjusted the guides forward to bury the blades in the blocks, and did a few test cuts.
Resawing a 4" piece made a straight line with no curve to the cut from top to bottom. Making circle cuts the blade held tight. The best part is there were no sparks like you might get from the steel guides.

.
Never, under any circumstances, combine a sleeping pill and a laxative on the same night.

Mike - Retired FoMoCo Tradesman
My Gallery @ http://www.routerforums.com/axlmyks-stuff/
AxlMyk is offline  
post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-29-2009, 02:43 PM
Registered User
 
Ghidrah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Ronald
Posts: 1,466
 
Default

I believe the MW is to remove moisture from the wood so that something else can take its place, like creating a sponge. Also the less moisture in the available sap means its more likely to stay put.

Still how often do you go thru cool blocks or ceramic guides?

Never bite the hand that looks dirty!
The more you know the more you're worth
Ghidrah is offline  
post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-29-2009, 03:13 PM
GBM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Greg
Posts: 93
 
Default

I was using the example of the threads because there are tables of comparisons available to show that WD40 is not a lubricant... so putting it on the wood blocks may be counter productive.... particularly if it washes away the natural oil of something like rosewood or lignum vitae.
When heating something which has moisture in it from the inside out... like a microwave does... instead of from the outside in...like a regular oven does... often causes the moisture to expand the substance or crush the cells... as with mica being turned into vermiculite.
The fact that something gets soaked up by the wood does not necessarily mean that after it is put against the blade that is constitutes a lubricant... so it may cause more heat instead of the assumed goal of less....
GBM is offline  
post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 03-29-2009, 04:21 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 258
 
Default

I,ve been told that WD-40 is more or less a dessicant. That is it will attract, or soak up moisture. The lubricating properties, I would guess, are probably nil or non-existant for use as cool blocks.

To further confuse the issue, I use corian blocks as supplied by the local woodworker store. I really don't know if these are any better or worse than anything else.

Ideally, the roller bearing type would seem to be the best (nothing rolls like a ball).

That a couple of cents worth!
a1tomo is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Makita RF1100, 1101, RD1100, 1101 Straight Guide markus General Routing 4 01-20-2009 11:46 AM
Router template inlay V Garry General Routing 7 12-27-2008 06:49 PM
Circular Saw and router guide "Off-set" plate simplenik Tools and Woodworking 9 11-19-2007 10:20 AM
Porter-Cable template guide no where to be found jnam Portable Routing 5 07-21-2006 07:54 PM
Porter-Cable template guide no where to be found jnam Jigs and Fixtures 3 02-21-2006 07:15 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome