Machine Jointing Sequence? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2018, 04:05 PM Thread Starter
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Default Machine Jointing Sequence?

Jointed a board and it became wedge shaped,why?
Sequence? If I start with a bowed board and give it several passes until the face is flat, then edge. If the edge is not square with face, do I then edge, then face, then edge, face until all square. Or continue edging until the edge is square with the face. Then run through the planer?
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2018, 04:20 PM
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face then edge...
cheat on the edge..
.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2018, 05:57 PM
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You register the edge to the face so face comes first. Jointers are good at making wedges. Planers make them flat again.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2018, 07:07 PM
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Saw a video today that discussed this. Think it was woodworkers guild...
Apparently, the jointer isn't perfectly 90* to the fence.
The work around is to joint one edge to one face of the board, then when you joint the opposite edge use the other board face. That way the two opposing angles match to make a flat glue up.
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2018, 07:15 PM
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parallel the opposite side on the TS...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2018, 09:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scap View Post
Saw a video today that discussed this. Think it was woodworkers guild...
Apparently, the jointer isn't perfectly 90* to the fence.
The work around is to joint one edge to one face of the board, then when you joint the opposite edge use the other board face. That way the two opposing angles match to make a flat glue up.
If the board had any twist to it at all then it needs to go through a planer after flattening one side in order to get both faces parallel to each other. Since the opposite face may not be co-planar until it does go though the planer then if you joint the edges before hand you should register the same face against the jointer fence. And that's after you made sure that both edges are co-planar by ripping one edge on the TS after the first edge gets jointed like Stick said. My jointer sits right behind me at the TS and I often have both running at the same time for that reason.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-13-2018, 07:13 AM
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All above is good advice but I would first check and make sure my knives are adjusted properly. Then check that the tables are parallel. If the jointer is setup properly then proceed. I had bought a used jointer some time back and found that my first board was a wedge no matter what. Had I taken the time to check the tool I would have found it was out of adjustment. The knives were OK but I replaced them and had them sharpened as well. Due diligence will help with success. Of course knowledge doesn't hurt either......

-Steve
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-13-2018, 04:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
If the board had any twist to it at all then it needs to go through a planer after flattening one side in order to get both faces parallel to each other. Since the opposite face may not be co-planar until it does go though the planer then if you joint the edges before hand you should register the same face against the jointer fence. And that's after you made sure that both edges are co-planar by ripping one edge on the TS after the first edge gets jointed like Stick said. My jointer sits right behind me at the TS and I often have both running at the same time for that reason.
O.k. Chuck, now say it again in English, eh.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-13-2018, 05:17 PM
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Re the "flattening one side" part.
You can do that with the planer as well. You'd have to set it up on an already flat board, so that one face is rock steady on shims, against the flat carrier board. Basically a shim sandwich.
Once the top face is evenly flat, remove it from the carrier, flip it over and do the opposite face. Now the two faces are 'co-planar'...ie parallel to each other and dead flat on both faces.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-14-2018, 01:49 AM Thread Starter
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OK thanks everyone.
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