Jointer Producing Uneven Surface - Page 3 - Router Forums
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post #21 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-21-2019, 08:54 AM
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I use the method shown by Peter. I raise the in-feed table level with the out-feed table and check that they ARE level with a steel straight edge. I slacken the bolts on one blade leaving a little friction so that it can be raised/lowered. I rotate the cutter head backwards using the belt, adjusting the blade at one end so that it just touches the wood. I repeat this at the other end of the blade and repeat this until the blade just touches the wood along it's length. I repeat this for the second blade. This means that the blades are level with the TABLE.
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post #22 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-21-2019, 11:53 AM
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I do the same Harry except I don't bother with getting the infeed level. I leave it down for more access to the knives. The infeed only controls depth of cut. It's the knives to outfeed relationship that is critical.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #23 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-21-2019, 02:49 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
This article about setting a jointer up seems pretty decent: https://www.woodmagazine.com/tuning-up-your-jointer
As stated at the very end of the article, the outfeed table needs to be set dead level with the tops of the knives. This is why setting the knives using the outfeed table is the best method of doing that. When you lay a board on the outfeed and turn the cutter head you should hear and feel the knives tick the bottom but the cutter shouldn't roll the board ahead.
Thanks Charles I've just read the article. " As stated at the very end of the article, the outfeed table needs to be set dead level with the tops of the knives. " I think it was a smart move ordering that King knife setting jig.
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post #24 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-21-2019, 10:38 PM
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One thing you'll want to do with that jig is make sure the cutter is at it's zenith when tightening the clamp bar on it. And it would still be a good idea to test it with a board laying on the outfeed and see if it wants to roll ahead when you rotate it by hand. If it does then all you need to do is adjust the the outfeed higher until it only just touches. At least with that jig the knives will be parallel to the bed.

These pictures hint at what proper setup should look like when it's right. If you run a board say a metre long about 30 cm over the knives and then stop when you look at it from the side if there is a gap under the board while holding the board down on the infeed side then the outfeed table is too low. If there is a gap under the tip of the board but it's on the outfeed bed next to the cutter head then the outfeed is too high. When the entire cut portion is lying dead flat it's perfect. http://www.eberhardt.bz/shop_notes/i...feed_table.pdf

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #25 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-22-2019, 03:51 AM Thread Starter
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One thing you'll want to do with that jig is make sure the cutter is at it's zenith when tightening the clamp bar on it. And it would still be a good idea to test it with a board laying on the outfeed and see if it wants to roll ahead when you rotate it by hand. If it does then all you need to do is adjust the the outfeed higher until it only just touches. At least with that jig the knives will be parallel to the bed.

These pictures hint at what proper setup should look like when it's right. If you run a board say a metre long about 30 cm over the knives and then stop when you look at it from the side if there is a gap under the board while holding the board down on the infeed side then the outfeed table is too low. If there is a gap under the tip of the board but it's on the outfeed bed next to the cutter head then the outfeed is too high. When the entire cut portion is lying dead flat it's perfect. http://www.eberhardt.bz/shop_notes/i...feed_table.pdf
OK thanks.
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post #26 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-22-2019, 05:53 AM Thread Starter
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One thing you'll want to do with that jig is make sure the cutter is at it's zenith when tightening the clamp bar on it. And it would still be a good idea to test it with a board laying on the outfeed and see if it wants to roll ahead when you rotate it by hand. If it does then all you need to do is adjust the the outfeed higher until it only just touches. At least with that jig the knives will be parallel to the bed.

These pictures hint at what proper setup should look like when it's right. If you run a board say a metre long about 30 cm over the knives and then stop when you look at it from the side if there is a gap under the board while holding the board down on the infeed side then the outfeed table is too low. If there is a gap under the tip of the board but it's on the outfeed bed next to the cutter head then the outfeed is too high. When the entire cut portion is lying dead flat it's perfect. http://www.eberhardt.bz/shop_notes/i...feed_table.pdf
" If you run a board say a metre long " I think this presupposes having a flat board.I have a length of 18mm MDF just put on jointer tables but not 100% flat, close too I can get a 0.1 - 0.15 feeler gauge under a precision straightedge on one side. I don't have any thinner MDF. " with a board laying on the outfeed and see if it wants to roll ahead when you rotate it by hand." If the MDF is suitable even if not being 100% flat, it might be too heavy to test by the cutters dragging it forward. For something else I do I have 1M x 1M x 3mm float glass and thicker 6mm. That I could cut to width to fit on jointer tables. Could I use the glass instead?
Thanks.

Last edited by Gaia; 02-22-2019 at 05:56 AM.
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post #27 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-22-2019, 08:16 AM
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The reason I make the in and out tables level is to give the piece of wood full support.

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post #28 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-22-2019, 09:30 AM
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The board shouldn't need to dead flat. It shouldn't rock if you apply pressure at different points but otherwise all the irregularities average out on it and it will sit solid enough on the infeed table to check the outfeed table height. If you currently have a gap under a straight edge then you need to attend to that. I don't know that I would use the glass. Any piece of wood or ply or mdf would be suitable for the drag test although the glass would allow you to see through and actually see what is happening. The blades should just tick the bottom but not try to move it. Once you have that then you can go to the test with an actual cut and look for the gaps.

The reason for the final cut test is because as the cutter cuts some of the wood off it may also compress some of the wood next to the cut which springs back as soon as it passes the cutter. This is also an issue when machining metal. And it's not just the material doing it. There is some compression in the machine where backlash is taken out of bearings when they are under pressure for example. That's why you need to check the finished cut to make sure it's set just right to compensate for some of these factors.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #29 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-22-2019, 01:35 PM Thread Starter
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The board shouldn't need to dead flat. It shouldn't rock if you apply pressure at different points but otherwise all the irregularities average out on it and it will sit solid enough on the infeed table to check the outfeed table height. If you currently have a gap under a straight edge then you need to attend to that. I don't know that I would use the glass. Any piece of wood or ply or mdf would be suitable for the drag test although the glass would allow you to see through and actually see what is happening. The blades should just tick the bottom but not try to move it. Once you have that then you can go to the test with an actual cut and look for the gaps.

The reason for the final cut test is because as the cutter cuts some of the wood off it may also compress some of the wood next to the cut which springs back as soon as it passes the cutter. This is also an issue when machining metal. And it's not just the material doing it. There is some compression in the machine where backlash is taken out of bearings when they are under pressure for example. That's why you need to check the finished cut to make sure it's set just right to compensate for some of these factors.
OK I have Sunday all clear, so will start having a look at machine.
Thanks again
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