Jointer Producing Uneven Surface - Router Forums
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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-19-2019, 11:04 AM Thread Starter
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Default Jointer Producing Uneven Surface

I've spent many, hair pulling hours, setting up and adjusting my jointer.
Aligning infeed, outfeed, precision straightedge, setting outfeed in line with knives in cutter block etc,etc. I've used the special knife setting jig supplied by the machines manufacturer to set the knives correctly in the cutterhead.

I jointed some Ash today I marked the face with pencil lines to see what was coming off. I did about 5 passes at 1/32 to try to get one face flat, ready for the planer. I then got a wedge that I got rid of in the planer.

So something still isn't correct, in the Ash photos you can see the pencil lines to the left which haven't all been removed, perhaps I missed something setting up?

Is really frustrating I have spent a lot of time adjusting the machine and am still not getting satisfactory results.
Attached photo of Ash and also of the jointer which shows the position of the fence that I used for jointing the Ash today. The Ash board edge where has not removed, the edge of this face was down on the table opposite the fence.
I don't think my feeding technique is at fault.
Thanks.
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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-19-2019, 12:00 PM
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Two thoughts...
1) The two tables aren't quite co-planer. I suspect your infeed table maybe out of square in relation to the fence.
2) The board itself may be warped, and will take multiple passes to get that face flat. If the board was already wedge shape, the jointer can potentially make that more pronounced. Remember the job of the jointer is to make a face flat, not necessarily to keep two faces parallel. Make sure you are not putting too much downward pressure on the board when passing through the jointer. There should be just enough pressure to push the board through the knives.
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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-19-2019, 02:51 PM
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Peter - first thing I'd do is to recheck the knives and reset them - could be that one of them is skewed.
I'd have to disagree with Mike's statement above regarding the fence - if your infeed/outfeed tables are co-planar, the fence should have no effect on flattening a face. The fence WILL determine if one edge is 90 deg. to the face

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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-19-2019, 03:09 PM
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Vince is correct. You don't even need a fence if you're cleaning up one face. Jointing an edge is a different story, though. Gotta' have a fence and it has to be 90į to the knives and bed(s).

David
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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-19-2019, 03:18 PM
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Could be any of the following:

Knives at an angle.

Infeed table not coplanar to the outfeed table.

Board that is far from flat.

Poor technique.

I'd look at the knives first, then the tables.

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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-19-2019, 03:30 PM
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My easy knife setting jig cost almost nothing, and makes it really easy to set the joiner knives perfect to the outfeed table. It also works surprisingly well at checking the alignment with the infeed table.

the jig is self explanatory, two boards with magnets on them, one for each end of the knife. You put the side with the 2 magnets far from the knife, and you put the side with the single magnet half on the table, half over the knife. This holds the knife in position, and parallel to the outfeed.

You can flip the jig around, and this gives you a check to see the alignment of the infeed table near the knife, and verify your cut depth. I use a 4 foot level to check if the infeed is coplanar to the outfeed.
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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-19-2019, 06:56 PM
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All the setting gauge does is set the height of the knives relative to the cutter head. If trhe head is not quite level with the tables then you'll get the results shown. You could check that without knives in the head by cranking the outfeed table down until level with head and checking with a straightedge. The knife gauge will give you the approximate correct amount of blade height relative to the cutter but when I set my knives I lay a flat piece of hardwood on the out feed and bottom the knives against it. If they are spring loaded this is pretty easy to do. You may need to adjust the outfeed slightly then. When you rotate the cutter by hand you should just feel the cutter rub the bottom of the board. You should be able to find pictures on the web of how to adjust the outfeed to give perfect results. As long as the tables and head are all coplanar then it's the outfeed setting that controls whether you are getting good results.

Just remembered that the first jointer I bought, a Delta cheapo, had curved slots in the cutter head. How they managed to machine curves in the head I'll never figure out. Sight down your knives once they are tightened down and make sure they are straight just in case it's happened twice. The curved knife will give similar results. When I checked it more carefully I found the center of the knives lower than the outer edges.
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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-20-2019, 03:25 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeMa View Post
Two thoughts...
1) The two tables aren't quite co-planer. I suspect your infeed table maybe out of square in relation to the fence.
2) The board itself may be warped, and will take multiple passes to get that face flat. If the board was already wedge shape, the jointer can potentially make that more pronounced. Remember the job of the jointer is to make a face flat, not necessarily to keep two faces parallel. Make sure you are not putting too much downward pressure on the board when passing through the jointer. There should be just enough pressure to push the board through the knives.
" I suspect your infeed table maybe out of square in relation to the fence." I checked infeed is square to fence. " The board itself may be warped," no it wasn't. "
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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-20-2019, 03:31 AM Thread Starter
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OK thanks Doug.
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 02-20-2019, 03:36 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
All the setting gauge does is set the height of the knives relative to the cutter head. If trhe head is not quite level with the tables then you'll get the results shown. You could check that without knives in the head by cranking the outfeed table down until level with head and checking with a straightedge. The knife gauge will give you the approximate correct amount of blade height relative to the cutter but when I set my knives I lay a flat piece of hardwood on the out feed and bottom the knives against it. If they are spring loaded this is pretty easy to do. You may need to adjust the outfeed slightly then. When you rotate the cutter by hand you should just feel the cutter rub the bottom of the board. You should be able to find pictures on the web of how to adjust the outfeed to give perfect results. As long as the tables and head are all coplanar then it's the outfeed setting that controls whether you are getting good results.

Just remembered that the first jointer I bought, a Delta cheapo, had curved slots in the cutter head. How they managed to machine curves in the head I'll never figure out. Sight down your knives once they are tightened down and make sure they are straight just in case it's happened twice. The curved knife will give similar results. When I checked it more carefully I found the center of the knives lower than the outer edges.
Hi Charles,
Thanks for the positive suggestions. I'll check out the things you mention I hope later today and will get back to the forum to tell how things worked out
Peter.
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