220 extension cord for tools - Page 7 - Router Forums
 90Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #61 of 74 (permalink) Old 02-28-2019, 08:49 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
sgcz75b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Country: United States
First Name: Steve
Posts: 161
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thermobaric View Post
at this point there is SO MUCH BAD INFORMATION IN THIS THREAD that it would be safer for a MOD to PLEASE NUKE THIS THREAD. Seriously, it's a safety hazard.
I agree that this thread is filled with not only bad information but life-and-property damaging misinformation.

Perhaps the moderator could put an asterisk * on this thread and explain that contained within this thread are many convoluted and dangerous ideas in electrical shop wiring by otherwise fairly intelligent people. Explain that because of this mis-mash of erroneous information, one should ALWAYS seek the advice of a qualified electrician and not rely on opinions of those who mean well but whose ideas may burn down your house and kill you.

Steve
thermobaric likes this.

"What can be asserted without proof can be dismissed without proof." Christopher Hitchens

sgcz75b is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #62 of 74 (permalink) Old 03-01-2019, 07:00 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
sgcz75b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Country: United States
First Name: Steve
Posts: 161
 
Default

My last post on this thread to wind it up.

Last Sunday, I posted the question about using a 220 extension cord.
No need to rehash the various opinions expressed.

An hour ago, my electrician left and here are the results.

I have a new 100 amp box. I have four 220 outlets properly installed with 20 amp breakers. I have two exterior 120 20 amp boxes on the same circuit. I have five 120 20 amp boxes all on separate circuits. I have 4 220 plugs to wire power tools as they arrive.

The cost for labor and materials = $1163.00

Less than one week from wondering about an extension cord to having an abundance of outlets at a cost that is well-below average.

I am happy. The end.

Steve
kp91, DaninVan, vchiarelli and 4 others like this.

"What can be asserted without proof can be dismissed without proof." Christopher Hitchens

sgcz75b is offline  
post #63 of 74 (permalink) Old 03-01-2019, 10:40 PM
Registered User
 
Traupmann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Charles
Posts: 5
 
Default

I've had a 220V extension cord running to my table saw for years. I used a Black line from Home Depot wire and standard 220 plugs. Never have had an issue with it. I recommend that you put labels along the cord for Safety.indicating that they are for 220V.
sgcz75b likes this.
Traupmann is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #64 of 74 (permalink) Old 03-02-2019, 08:33 AM
Registered User
 
MN Southpaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Matt
Posts: 2
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sgcz75b View Post
I have a 220 50 amp circuit in my shop for welding which I will use for my 220 bandsaw. Is there any reason not to make a 220 extension cord that would make it easier to change out plugs?

Maybe a gang box with a couple of plugs? I wouldn't be running two tools at a time, but the convenience would be great.

I'm sure someone here has done that so would you give me some tips?

Thanks.

Steve
I am a licensed electrician, and woodworker.
Yes, you can use an 8 awg extension cord, which will be large enough to protect your EXTENSION CORD for the given circuit it is plugged into.
BUT that is only half of the problem. What is the maximum circuit size your 220v bandsaw is rated for? 20 amps? 30 amps? Putting a power tool on a 50 amp circuit (circuit breaker size, not wire size) when the tool connected is only rated to be on a 20 or 30 amp maximum circuit, will leave your BANDSAW unprotected in the event of an over-current. Check your owners manual for the bandsaw, to verify the maximum circuit size allowed for this tool. If you want to use the welder circuit to feed the bandsaw, you may need to install a smaller circuit breaker or fuses at the electrical panel, to meet requirements for the bandsaw.

Please remember this quote: Electricity has a way of weeding out the Stupid!
If you are not qualified, it is best to leave electrical work for those who are.
I am not saying this to insult you, just to caution you on the potential dangers involved.
kp91 likes this.

Last edited by MN Southpaw; 03-02-2019 at 08:46 AM.
MN Southpaw is offline  
post #65 of 74 (permalink) Old 03-02-2019, 10:19 AM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 13,684
 
Default

Thanks, Matt; you vindicated what I said earlier on re the oversized breaker and the potential (no pun intended) for damaging the machine...and I'm not an electrician!
kp91 likes this.
DaninVan is online now  
post #66 of 74 (permalink) Old 03-02-2019, 11:26 AM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 13,684
 
Default

Heh...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	endless-debate-Norman-Rockwell.jpg
Views:	6
Size:	175.7 KB
ID:	366445  

kp91 and thermobaric like this.
DaninVan is online now  
post #67 of 74 (permalink) Old 03-03-2019, 03:24 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Country: Canada
First Name: rob
Posts: 98
 
Default

Most consumer goods supplied with a plug should have built in protection from over current. The Electric code does not cover machines with plugs, it stops at the receptacle. Power cords and extension cords only need to be big enough for the load on them, not the size of breaker on the circuit feeding them. FWIW the trip time for a 10 amp or a 50 amp breaker is just about identical in a short circuit situation. The code has plenty to say about hard-wired devices with motors to the point of complexity that the device should come with instructions for breaker size, mostly to prevent nuisance trips that could lead to dangerous work arounds by non qualified players.
Rob
thermobaric and sgcz75b like this.
tooler2 is offline  
post #68 of 74 (permalink) Old 03-03-2019, 12:10 PM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 13,684
 
Default

Rob; the Canadian Electrical Code covers EVERYTHING, just not in the volume generally available at the Electrical wholesaler (Part I), or wherever you get yours from.
Five parts in total, if I'm not mistaken...
https://blog.ansi.org/2018/01/parts-...-code-csa-c22/
DaninVan is online now  
post #69 of 74 (permalink) Old 03-03-2019, 03:51 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Country: Canada
First Name: rob
Posts: 98
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
Rob; the Canadian Electrical Code covers EVERYTHING, just not in the volume generally available at the Electrical wholesaler (Part I), or wherever you get yours from.
Five parts in total, if I'm not mistaken...
https://blog.ansi.org/2018/01/parts-...-code-csa-c22/


From consumer's point of view, the CSA tests all electric products sold in Canada so as to insure that any idiot can bring something home from the store and plug it into a receptacle without regard to any other knowledge. The CEC (which may indeed be written by the CSA as your link to the blog of the American National Standards Institute seems to indicate.) is the ''code'' that applies to hard wiring in buildings. As a consumer you do not have to know about any of it, that is not your job, unless you start playing around installing or modifying any thing electrical.Those of us that are comfortable with electricity will make up a ''cheater'' extension cord with different rated male and female ends but are reluctant to recommend others do it or more to the point make one up for somebody else. By the same token when Festool had to recall vacuums because they had not passed CSA inspection but had passed UL for the USA we were not really concerned about safety but the tools had to be returned anyway. When I see blatantly dangerous information on a public forum I feel an ethical persuasion to respond, even if that makes me unpopular.
Rob
tooler2 is offline  
post #70 of 74 (permalink) Old 03-03-2019, 04:51 PM
Registered User
 
RainMan 2.0's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Country: Canada
First Name: Rick
Posts: 15,196
 
Default

Iím not an electrician,but I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night
tulowd likes this.

I don't know anything about CNC router tables , but I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night
RainMan 2.0 is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Frankenstein Lives!! Jet 1014 Extended gdonham1 Woodturning and Lathes 5 01-23-2019 11:09 PM
DIY Extension Cord MT Stringer Show N' Tell 9 12-15-2014 07:49 AM
220 Volt Extension Cords jbullockusanet Shop Safety 55 08-09-2014 12:36 PM
Extension cord + power strip: advice needed xvimbi Tools and Woodworking 15 07-16-2010 10:55 AM
Router Table Extension - Attachment and Alignment GarethR Table-mounted Routing 1 11-20-2009 12:47 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome