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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-07-2019, 06:47 PM Thread Starter
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Default Success and Failure

I believe that before achieving success in woodworking one must also experience failure of some kind as well. Additionally, like I use to tell my students and staff, ask questions before you make the wrong decision.

After putting the splines in (end grain facing out this time) I cut the lid off (success) without a hitch, well sort of. I must have watched dozens of videos on how to do it and went with the way Marc Spagnuolo (Wood Whisperer) does it. https://diysynthcases.com/how-to-cut-off-a-box-lid/

The failure was that the lid did not matched the case. When I looked at it there was a saw cut on the vertical portion of the lid. Not only was I cutting along the horizontal as I pushed the box through the blade, but the vertical part (leading edge and trailing edge) was also getting cut.

Where did I go wrong? Was the blade set too high. How do I determine at what height to set blade?

Luckily, I can use the remaining portion to try again as a test. My other options are to cut just short of the all the way through and saw it off or build the lid separately.

Thanks for the help.
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-07-2019, 07:13 PM
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Blade height = side thickness, or just a little higher.

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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-07-2019, 07:25 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Gerry. That was my first guess. I thought I did that but maybe I measured from the front of the blade rather than at its highest point. Does it matter if the joint is a beveled miter?
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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-08-2019, 08:58 AM
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Freud suggests the blade should be slightly higher than the stock and the bottom of the gullet should be apx. 1/2 way up from the top.
The way I interpret this is; If the stock is 1/2'' thick, then the blade should be between 9/16'' and 5/8'' up and depending on the type of blade, the bottom of the gullet should be apx.1/4'' from the top. I never raise the blade more than required to do the job. If the blade only sticks up 1/8'' or less from the surface, an accidental slip of a hand or fingers would be far less damaging than if the blade is all the way up ! I would rather have a cut than an amputation.

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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-08-2019, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Danman1957 View Post
Freud suggests the blade should be slightly higher than the stock and the bottom of the gullet should be apx. 1/2 way up from the top.
The way I interpret this is; If the stock is 1/2'' thick, then the blade should be between 9/16'' and 5/8'' up and depending on the type of blade, the bottom of the gullet should be apx.1/4'' from the top. I never raise the blade more than required to do the job. If the blade only sticks up 1/8'' or less from the surface, an accidental slip of a hand or fingers would be far less damaging than if the blade is all the way up ! I would rather have a cut than an amputation.
Yeah, that is a basic, but a lot of the utubers seem to have never heard of it. I learned it in 1953/4. I set my blade so it just cuts completely thru the wood, which would place it a bit lower than 1/8".
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-08-2019, 09:30 AM Thread Starter
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Dan & JOAT - Thanks for info. I now see where I went wrong. BTW, do you prefer a 1/8" or TK blade to cut the lid.
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-08-2019, 10:00 AM
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Dan & JOAT - Thanks for info. I now see where I went wrong. BTW, do you prefer a 1/8" or TK blade to cut the lid.
One or two items: I rarely use a thin kerf blade anymore and most of the time use a Glue Line full kerf blade.

The other thing is, are you always checking to see if the blade is 90 to the table? It is very easy for that to slip. If the blade is just over the thickness of the piece, it isn't quite so important, but when I fail to check this with my trusty Wixey, I find the result is sometimes a problem.

Oh yes, with a box, I'd want to sweep all the sawdust away before making each of the four cuts. You're looking for an exact alignment of each pass. Sawdust buildup could cause a misaligned cut.

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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-08-2019, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Freud suggests the blade should be slightly higher than the stock and the bottom of the gullet should be apx. 1/2 way up from the top.
The way I interpret this is; If the stock is 1/2'' thick, then the blade should be between 9/16'' and 5/8'' up and depending on the type of blade, the bottom of the gullet should be apx.1/4'' from the top. I never raise the blade more than required to do the job. If the blade only sticks up 1/8'' or less from the surface, an accidental slip of a hand or fingers would be far less damaging than if the blade is all the way up ! I would rather have a cut than an amputation.
For normal cutting, yes.
But for this application, I would not raise it that high, as it increases your chance of gouging the vertical surface when cutting through.

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The other thing is, are you always checking to see if the blade is 90 to the table? It is very easy for that to slip. If the blade is just over the thickness of the piece, it isn't quite so important, but when I fail to check this with my trusty Wixey, I find the result is sometimes a problem.
Make sure the fence is 90į as well.
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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-08-2019, 12:04 PM
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I set the blade -1/64 approx. less than the thickness of the sides, and cut all way around then use a utility knife to remove the top. I was taught this many moons ago, and it works good for me.the thin sliver can be removed easily with a sanding block.

Are you cutting with the top against the fence, or the bottom against the fence? I try to do the cutting with the bottom against the fence , unless the box is too large, it gives you more surface to square up the cut.

An other option is to cut the top off on the band saw, just one pass through will do the job, the only con about that is that cut will take a little more sanding to remove the kerf marks.

Herb

Last edited by Herb Stoops; 03-08-2019 at 12:49 PM.
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 03-08-2019, 02:58 PM
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Hate to bring this up but if your box is a little out of square or has a slight twist from over clamping or poor fitting joints then you will probably have problems trying to cut the top off.

Reading your post it sounds more to me like your saw blade was not 90 to the table.
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