pitting on the sole of a plane - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 08:14 PM
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I have a nice Wind River #6 that's a treat to use. Definitely runs better with a squiggle of wax across the sole. Not sure whether I'll ever need a #7, but then again, what does need have to do with anything?
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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-19-2019, 04:06 AM
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Quote:
on the flat soled planes, a nice squiggly line of candle wax lightly applied routinely
maybe not such a good plan...

If you are considering candle wax... not all candles are created equal...
You also have to contend w/ dyes in the wax...
Best to steer clear of using candle wax...
Candle making colorants come in a vegetable based block so there is no paraffin in these color blocks.

PARAFFIN CANDLES

Paraffin development began in 1830, but manufactured paraffin was not introduced until 1850. It provided an alternative to tallow which gave off an unpleasant odor when burned. In 1854 paraffin and stearin (the solid form of fat) were combined to create stronger candles, very similar to those we use today.

BEESWAX CANDLES
Candles have a wide variety of ingredients, but there are only a few main ingredients that are used throughout most of the world. We will talk about the main types, and the advantages and differences of each.
Most honey and bees wax is collected from July to September. It can come from the pollination of canola, sweet clover or sunflowers. Generally these plants result in a lighter scent and lighter colored beeswax.
There are two types, solid beeswax and honeycomb wax. The solid bees wax candle is created by pouring liquid wax into a candle mold. The result is a smooth, dense candle which burns for an extremely long time. Honeycomb beeswax candles are created by rolling honeycomb textured sheets. The honeycomb candle is less dense and burns faster.
Beeswax candles produce a bright flame, do not drip, do not smoke or sputter, and produce a fragrant honey odor while being burned.

CRYSTAL WAX CANDLES
These are also called wax tarts or wax potpourri. They are made with an all-natural candle wax that holds twice as much fragrance as paraffin wax candles, making them suitable for highly scented candles. They are used with a potpourri warmer (without any water). The fragrance emerges when the candle starts to melt.

GEL CANDLES
Gel candles have a new and unique look. They give off a beautiful illumination and a wonderful aroma. And they burn three times as long as wax candles.
But be careful. Gel candles produce a higher burning flame and they burn much hotter. Too much heat can shatter a glass candle-holder or container which can ignite nearby combustibles, resulting in a room fire. To be safe, never burn a gel candle more than four hours.

SOY CANDLES

Soy wax candles are made from soy beans. They are non-toxic, non-carcinogenic and bio-degradable. They burn up to 40% longer than paraffin candles and burn evenly which means there is no tunneling effect. However, it is not recommended to burn more than four hours at a time. Soy candles are very sensitive to temperature and light. They should be stored away from sunlight, fluorescent lighting and other sources of heat.

Be careful of today's "paraffin" candles. They may NOT be real paraffin but a synthetic concoction that may contain silicons. If you want to be sure you are actually getting real paraffin, look for canning wax. You can find it at Wally World or anyplace that sells canning supplies. If you can't find it with the canning supplies, which are generally in the housewares section, walk over to the grocery side and you'll find it there. it is sold in a pound box which contains several 3" x 5" x 1/2" blocks. One block will last you for a long, long, time.

.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf WAX V.2.pdf (39.0 KB, 12 views)

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-19-2019, 08:54 AM
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For future reference; if a surface is damaged like the sole of the plane, you might be surprised how little a machine shop might charge to re hone the sole to dead flat !
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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-19-2019, 09:11 AM
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As I read through the literature on vintage planes one thing that stood out was the plane sole and its flatness. Seems that there were certain areas that were critical to being completely flat while others weren't as critical. Now before anyone jumps I'm pulling this from memory so there may be some "rusty" parts.....Seems the toe area in front of the iron all the way across and the sides going to the heel were very important to be flat as well as directly behind the iron. The heel should also be flat all the way across. My understanding was if there was a bit of a hollow in the center area behind the iron after the cut going back towards the heel it was acceptable. That made sense to me as the overall surface contact area with the wood would be flat. So I guess if the plane sole 's outside area is flat including the toe and heel you're in decent shape. What I'm unclear about is how much this flat area should be. Obviously the more the better but what in the minimum? Most planes I've see are what maximum 2 to 2-1/2" wide so are we talking 25-50% with more being better. Are we talking 1/2" in from the sides all the way back?
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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-20-2019, 07:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
maybe not such a good plan...

If you are considering candle wax... not all candles are created equal...
You also have to contend w/ dyes in the wax...
Best to steer clear of using candle wax...
Candle making colorants come in a vegetable based block so there is no paraffin in these color blocks.
Noteworthy points indeed. Never really considered or scented wax. I've had a brick of paraffin wax for I don't know how long and still have better than half of it left. At that, I've waxed the soles of my planes pretty much from the start and I've never had an issue with finishing.

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post #16 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-20-2019, 07:39 AM
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Noteworthy points indeed. Never really considered or scented wax. I've had a brick of paraffin wax for I don't know how long and still have better than half of it left. At that, I've waxed the soles of my planes pretty much from the start and I've never had an issue with finishing.
Same here...
it's the ''other'' that may result in issues....

furniture, bees and canning wax are excellent too...

I think avoiding candles might be in order...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #17 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-20-2019, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
Same here...
it's the ''other'' that may result in issues....

furniture, bees and canning wax are excellent too...

I think avoiding candles might be in order...

Yep!!

@Cherrville Chuck @Semipro
Gentlemen, would either of you be so kind as to remove "candle" from my previous post #10. I see now where that can easily be misinterpreted.

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post #18 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-20-2019, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by TwoSkies57 View Post
Yep!!

@Cherrville Chuck @Semipro
Gentlemen, would either of you be so kind as to remove "candle" from my previous post #10. I see now where that can easily be misinterpreted.
Done. When I read that it made me think that whatever is appropriate for putting on machine tops such as table saws or jointers would also work on plane bottoms. I have some Waxilit that I got from LV. My largest plane is about a #5 but it has the corrugated sole so it hasn't needed any friction reduction treatment.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #19 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-20-2019, 10:58 AM
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Thank you Charles,,,,

there are probably so many products that would work, its sometimes hard to find one that actually does.. I've used paraffin wax for planes and ivory soap for screws for decades *LOL*...the wax might work on the screws, but I've still got a upteen year old brick of paraffin and I"ve gone thru countless bars of soap...I think we tend to stick with what works based on what we've used... Stick made a good point though.... "wax" is so generic, and covers so, so many variations that a poorly worded phrase or comment can lead someone down a very problem ridden path..........
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post #20 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-20-2019, 11:20 AM
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You would be alarmed to find out how many plane crashes have occurred because of unspecific language between the tower and planes or ground crews. The worst in BC history happened because of that between the tower and a snow plow operator at the Cranbrook airport.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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