Jig Saw issue - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-05-2019, 03:59 PM
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Not that you might be doing this but sometimes it's easy to push towards the inside of the radius and that will have a beveling effect. You might look for this on a test piece.

Hold the saw lighter and turn into the radius with your wrist rather than the whole arm. It might be helpful to "push" towards the outside of the radius while turning the saw. It's the turn that guides the blade and not the side push.

...just sumptin' to try...

I have an old craftsman and when I use it I have to be very conscious on the turns... I also have a Bosch barrel grip and it works so well I can almost guide it from the power cord.
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post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-05-2019, 04:19 PM
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I think all the better ones have a roller blade guide near the base shoe. Can’t speak for the cheap brands.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-06-2019, 10:27 AM
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I had a Craftsman jig saw for years, and seldom used it for the same reason you're encountering. I always wondered why jigsaws were so highly touted when clearly they were troublesome to use. Then one day a Bosch jig saw appeared in my shop ... the jig saw skies parted, and glorious sunshine burst forth in my shop. Jig saw bliss had arrived. And it was good.

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post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-06-2019, 10:39 AM
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@Gaffboat Positively biblical post.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-06-2019, 03:51 PM
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Like you, I didn't use my jig saw very often. It was a Craftsman, probably 40 years old. I only used it for rough cuts since, like yours, the blade went out of vertical on anything more than gentle curves, and it vibrated. About a year ago, Lowe's had a sale and, with my military discount, I couldn't pass it up. Like Oliver, it was almost a biblical experience. I finally found out why they made jig saws. I've used it more in the last year than I did the Craftsman in the last 10 years. Well worth the price. I know how hard it is to part with a tool, especially if it's an old friend, even if you fought with it all the time, but sometimes it's the best move.

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post #16 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 10:08 AM Thread Starter
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[QUOTE=Barry747;2023489 I know how hard it is to part with a tool, especially if it's an old friend, even if you fought with it all the time, but sometimes it's the best move.[/QUOTE]

- thats what I am thinking ....

- ok, I agree with Stick and Gaffboat on the Bosch solution. I'll go with that one as some of the curves/slots I have been making, you can't really get a good sander in them <no, I can't use a router in this application> and going back over with a coping saw and then hand sanding seems to be not very time efficient, or accurate. At least to me.

- ebill > thanks all !
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post #17 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 10:22 AM
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You might find this of some use...

.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf JIGSAW BLADE GUIDE.pdf (957.9 KB, 17 views)

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post #18 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 10:42 AM
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I fought with an old Craftsman for years. It had the swivel head "scroll" function that wouldn't stay locked which made it doubly frustrating. Then one day about 25 years ago I walked into the House of Tools in Langley when I was down there visiting and they had a Metabo on sale. It was still pretty expensive but I went for it anyway and I've never regretted it. It was like moving up to a Cadillac from a Russian Lada. I gave my son a Dewalt a few Christmases ago and it had the added feature of tool less blade change. It is also a well made tool that has some weight to it. Any decent tool will have some heft to it besides having that roller blade guide to keep the cuts straight. There is still some technique involved as Nick pointed out but you won't have to fight the machine. Blades can be important too as Stick is pointing out. For tight curves you want a narrow blade with coarse teeth that have a fair amount of set.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #19 of 19 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 12:27 PM
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This is a really good thread. Lots of subtle informaiton about jig saw technique, especially the unknowing pressing toward the inside of a curve. And, the suggestion to look for a blade guide when you buy.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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