Is This plane a good value? - Page 3 - Router Forums
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post #21 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-24-2019, 09:40 PM
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That will require a serious savings program!
so how long will be till delivery..
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post #22 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-24-2019, 11:02 PM
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For my tools like that my preference is older tools. Usually they are not costly, and perform well. And I like looking at them a lot more. Flea markets and yard sales are often good, and cheap. Ebay sometimes has something at a reasonable price, just check shipping charges. I don't buy the old tools just to collect them tho, they will be used, or not bought at all.

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post #23 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-25-2019, 11:04 AM
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Some of the old Stanleys can be tuned to work fairly well but that tuning process can take from hours to days to get them working well. Plus when Lee Valley and probably Lie Neilsen started making planes they looked at the old ones (mostly Stanleys) and determined what the weak points were and corrected them. So no matter how well you can tune an old one it still probably won't be as good as a new one by those two companies.
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post #24 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-28-2019, 07:54 PM
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The trouble is that the picture doesn't let you know the quality of the machining. I have a 3 in 1 Record plane that looks similar. I bought it 40 years ago and I think I paid more then. But when I use it as a bull plane and take the long nose off it works. When I put the long nose back on it aligns perfectly. So, you may have a bargain or you may have one that just will sit in a drawer and never get used after the first day. With Lie Nielsen or Veritas you will pay a lot more but you absolutely will love the plane
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post #25 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-28-2019, 11:03 PM
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Some of the old Stanleys can be tuned to work fairly well but that tuning process can take from hours to days to get them working well. Plus when Lee Valley and probably Lie Neilsen started making planes they looked at the old ones (mostly Stanleys) and determined what the weak points were and corrected them. So no matter how well you can tune an old one it still probably won't be as good as a new one by those two companies.
Yeah, that is part of the price of buying and using old tools. And part of the fun of buying and using old tools.

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post #26 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-29-2019, 11:56 AM
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For a shoulder plane, you are wanting the sides to be as close to a perfect 90 degrees to the bottom as possible. With this one having a removable front, it just seems like that would add a degree of error to it. This plane would end up costing you more (financial, frustration, time) then if you were to get a Veritas or Lie-Nielsen.
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post #27 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-29-2019, 12:56 PM
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For a shoulder plane, you are wanting the sides to be as close to a perfect 90 degrees to the bottom as possible.
Also true for a plane that gets used with a shooting board.
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post #28 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-30-2019, 07:43 AM
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I've noticed @Stick486 is strong advocate for hand planes. I would like expert opinion on this item I found on Amazon: (I could not get a link to the webpage to work. I do apologize tor all inconvenience everyone who tries to respond will have)
Taytools 469225 3-in-1 Shoulder Plane, Bullnose and Chisel Plane, Ductile Cast Iron, Precision Machined, 1 Inch Wide Blade
As Stick made note, manufactured in India by Shobha Industries. The body is pretty generic to several different brand names: ShopFox, Bench Dog, Rider and several others. Often the only difference is the design and materials used for the handles and adjustment mechanisms. The degree to which fit and finish plays into the end product influences the price range as well.

Good value??? All depends on just how much one is willing to invest on the investment. Out of the box, Lie Nielsen is ready to go, Lee Valley/Veritas may require just a little tweaking (flattening of the iron back, lapping) same with Wood River, Record, Clifton and other Higher priced planes. All superior to the Taytools unit. But you pay for it up front.

With these, out of the box you can pretty much bet your going to need to invest some sweat equity to get it properly tuned up. Once you do get it turned up to perform decently, how well it holds that tune is another matter altogether.

If the plane is intended to be used often, comfort plays a critical role in choice. At least for me it does. You just can't beat the feel of a quality tool.
If intended for a one off project or just occasional use, the Shobha models "MAY" be alright. In woodworking, the difference between 'alright" and "great" can be absolutely HUGE in many, many ways.

just my 2cents worth

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post #29 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-30-2019, 05:15 PM
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I have two Shoba planes, bought fairly cheaply when they were first introduced here. The price (and to a much lesser extent, the quality) has gone up quite a bit since then. I lived in India for a while, and these planes exemplify a “good enough” philosophy applied to a lot of manufacturing over there.
I have a 4 1/2 smoothing plane, which is satisfyingly hefty, but mysteriously unbalanced in the hand; neither side is square to the sole, by an irremediable amount. The sole needed quite a bit of flattening, and is still not dead flat. The machining of the mating surfaces is poor, but not as poor as a made-in-England no. 5 Bailey plane I bought some 30 years ago.
The other is a jointer, with a grooved sole. Due to its length, much harder to flatten. The sides are squarish to the sole, and potentially could be made dead-square, although superfluous for jointing.
I fitted both planes with PV VII blades and matching irons. The price was still way below that of a complete plane from LV, and while obviously not in the same league as an Veritas plane, gives a better result than what I can reasonably use.
My father was a master builder. His carpenters made do with post-war Stanleys, without the finesse of polished soles, etc, and I used to think that my indifferent results from my Bailey were a case of a bad workman blaming his tools. Until I did some reading, and spent some time tuning the plane (to the extent possible in that sorry specimen), and replaced the blade with a Veritas one I am still a bad workman, but the results are much better, with less effort. I even equipped it with an Veritas variable - angle fence, although I hardly ever plane a board wide enough to permit its use.
If I were starting out now, I would go the Veritas route, and not waste time and money and curses on inferior tools. But at my time of life, the expense is not commensurate with my needs or abilities. In any case, I have moved to Japanese planes, and hardly ever use the Western planes anymore.
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post #30 of 36 (permalink) Old 08-31-2019, 12:54 PM Thread Starter
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so how long will be till delivery..
@Stick486 , The Skew Block Planes are out of stock until Oct. 6 and the Skew Rabbet Planes are out of stock until Nov. 30.
Question: why the need for both RH and LH versions?
What about Jack Planes and Small Smooth Planes?

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