Joining boards along their length - Page 4 - Router Forums
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post #31 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 02:02 AM Thread Starter
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@Biagio I can promise, no barbell weights behind the soup bowls

I understand what you're saying, and it would also mean less "wastage" from having to saw off both sides, so I can see the value.

If I truly have nothing to worry about there, then perhaps salvaging the larger amount from the sheet (for future use of course) may be the better option.
Now I just have to "nail" down the option to use for joining
@Stick486 I too had a look at some of those sites, thank you. At least 1 didn't have anything less than 25mm in any ply, and most of them are not local to me, meaning a bit of a trip.
I did discover some AA grade marine ply at our local Bunnings (big box store) that could be a good option. I'm already considering buying a sheet for the back, because the colour of the outer veneer sheet closely matches the beech so would be a good match.
The downside is it's 12mm, so a bit wide for a spline in this case. I don't know if trimming it back down to 6mm is even worth trying. I've gotta go there anyway so might look for spline options at the same time
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post #32 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 03:01 AM
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resaw the plywood...
rip the ply to width 1st...
use featherboards...
Stoobydale likes this.

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”

Last edited by Stick486; 10-15-2019 at 03:04 AM.
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post #33 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 04:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Biagio View Post
@Stick486
I defer to your knowledge and experience. Always great to learn from you.
@Biagio ...
please don't...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #34 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 05:48 AM
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@Stick486
In spite of my deference, I would still go for dowels in 1fizgig’s stated case. A matter of matching the Positional and strength requirements of the joint, the available materials and tools, the time required, and the expected overall longevity of the furniture piece. And in my case, limitations of ability. I have even found biscuit joints to be trickier than advertised.
@steve , if you go the splined route, remember to have both lengths good face down on your router table when you cut the grooves for the spline - that way, even if there is a mild discrepancy in thickness of the boards, it will be on the underside of the joint. I don’t think you need to worry about stopped splines, unless the edge of the board will be exposed as part of your design.
BTW, how are you planning to join the top and bottom to the sides and divider of the carcass? If you are planning mitred corner joints, it may then pay you to do those as splined mitres, in which case it may be worthwhile investing the setup time and learning curve for splined joints. I think you will need a table saw - I don’t have one, so have used a biscuit joiner to cut the spline. I chickened out of trying it on my radial arm saw.
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post #35 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 06:04 AM
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I chickened out of trying it on my radial arm saw.
good move..

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #36 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 06:35 AM Thread Starter
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@Biagio
Check out option 3 for cutting a spline slot in this woodmagazine article:
https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodwor...oinery/plywood


Since I have no slot cutter, this would be a way I could cut the slot. And given I already have a mortising jig that I could use for this, that could work. I certainly have smaller cutting bits.

I'm still wondering about the rabbet idea, especially since the baseboard will be fixed to the sides and divider. The divider will be screwed and glued from underneath. The sides and back, well I haven't decided yet. I want to avoid screws from the outside on the sides. The back may well get screwed on like the divider.

Given the amount of support the baseboard will get, and that the amount of weight it will support is likely to be a number of porcelain platters, I'm not sure that the join needs to be in the middle like Biagio was suggesting. In which case, how much weight is it likely to have on it, and what does that mean for the style of joint required?

Mostly thinking out loud and wanted to share where I'm at.

If I chose to do a spline, does it have to be A grade ply? Could I use a lower grade ply since it will not be visible? Given the length involved, even if there was a few voids, it shouldn't make a lot of difference you would think?
By rabbet, in this instance it would be a "double rabbet", in that both pieces would get a rabbet to increase surface gluing area.

Last edited by 1fizgig; 10-15-2019 at 06:49 AM.
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post #37 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 07:10 AM
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1... Since I have no slot cutter, this would be a way I could cut the slot. And given I already have a mortising jig that I could use for this, that could work. I certainly have smaller cutting bits.

2... I'm still wondering about the rabbet idea, especially since the baseboard will be fixed to the sides and divider.

3... The divider will be screwed and glued from underneath. The sides and back, well I haven't decided yet. I want to avoid screws from the outside on the sides. The back may well get screwed on like the divider.

Given the amount of support the baseboard will get, and that the amount of weight it will support is likely to be a number of porcelain platters, I'm not sure that the join needs to be in the middle like Biagio was suggesting. In which case,

4... how much weight is it likely to have on it, and what does that mean for the style of joint required?

Mostly thinking out loud and wanted to share where I'm at.

5... If I chose to do a spline, does it have to be A grade ply? Could I use a lower grade ply since it will not be visible? Given the length involved, even if there was a few voids,

6... it shouldn't make a lot of difference you would think?

7... By rabbet, in this instance it would be a "double rabbet", in that both pieces would get a rabbet to increase surface gluing area.
1... yes that would work..
support the router so it doesn't rock ot rip as you are routering...

2... baseboard???

3... the top needs to '''float''.. consider it to be a table top..
https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/...-wood-movement

4... what you are doing should hold up several adults..

5... no...

6... no...

7... the joint is called a ship lap... this joint will move/open up...
you will get more gluing surface w/ a spline...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #38 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 08:06 AM
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@steve ,
Perhaps you need to think out the base-to-side and top-to-side joints, before proceeding. There is the matter of aesthetics. The divider could be a simple dado, as you suggest, perhaps stopped at the front.
Regarding the back, you might want to consider setting the back into a rabbet all around the inside edge of the carcass - hidden from view, may add a smidgen of structural support to prevent the carcass going out of square. In such case, cut the divider slightly narrower than the sides, by an amount equal to the rabbet depth - otherwise you will be exercising your expletive vocabulary.
I have a jig like in the article you referenced, but frankly prefer to do it with a 6mm slot cutter on a router table. Stability is the thing.
How are you going to edge the front of the cabinet?
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post #39 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-15-2019, 05:18 PM Thread Starter
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@Stick486 :
Baseboard: this is made of the boards I need to join and the topic I've raised. It will form the base of the cabinet. The top is a single piece and I already have that, as the beech laminate comes wide enough in 26mm thick sheets. But due to the weight of the entire piece (and that one day I'll have to move this out of a multi-story house with no lift), we're trying to avoid using 26mm thick material for the bottom board of the cabinet.

I have found this material to be very structurally sound with minimal movement, but yes, I'm planning on treating the top like a table for sure! Thanks for the reminder though, I don't want to forget in the heat of the moment. I was thinking about some "Z-clips".
@Biagio :
I was planning on rabbeting in the back, or at the least mounting it inside the outer edge of the carcass as you suggested already (wife appreciation factor again). I had already figured that would give a bit of structural integrity. Plus, that's why I could screw up from the baseboard into it.

The front of the cabinet will not need edging: the material being used shows off its beech timber beautifully, as it's not ply. No veneers or anything required: solid wood. It will remain "plain", meaning not given any features other than maybe softening the edges.
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post #40 of 40 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
are you referring to PU construction adhesive like PL400 and PL Premium...
Yes. I don't remember the specific one I used, it was 8 to 10 years ago.
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