Robertson and Phillips, A History and Evolution - Router Forums
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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-23-2019, 07:14 PM Thread Starter
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Default Robertson and Phillips, A History and Evolution

In a totally unrelated recent thread both the Robertson and Phillips screwdriver/screws seemed to draw some interest. So I decided to do some googling and found this video to be the most interesting one of the bunch.

Interesting in that the evolution of the screw and driver and the success and failure of them is related to historical events.

I hope you find this as interesting as I did...but then again, I'm easily amused...


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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-23-2019, 09:19 PM
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Very interesting. That guy has some really interesting videos. When I was young I was always told, use screws if you intend to take something apart later, and use nails when you never intend to take something apart later. Works for me.

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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-23-2019, 10:53 PM
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Many of our hardware stores sell then in bins like yours do nails. (We have bins of those too of course.) My local store has them for under $4/lb starting at 1 1/4" and going up to either 5 or 6". Many also have bins of the coated deck screws too. They really are the best screw in the world. Quite often when I get something that has included Phillips screws I'll thread a the hole first with a Robertson so that I can get the Phillips in without destroying the head.
thomas1389, TenGees, Nickp and 3 others like this.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-23-2019, 11:22 PM
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Very interesting. Quite a lot of interesting detail.
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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-24-2019, 07:37 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
Many of our hardware stores sell then in bins like yours do nails. (We have bins of those too of course.) My local store has them for under $4/lb starting at 1 1/4" and going up to either 5 or 6". Many also have bins of the coated deck screws too. They really are the best screw in the world. Quite often when I get something that has included Phillips screws I'll thread a the hole first with a Robertson so that I can get the Phillips in without destroying the head.

Most often it seems the screw and the bit were made for something else...I found the Dewalt bits fit Phillips best...depth, angle and fit to width...

And don't ya just hate long Phillips stainless...? Going in or coming out...

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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-24-2019, 07:41 AM
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Square drive screws readily available here in SA, and popular with a lot of woodworkers - me included.
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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-24-2019, 08:26 AM
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What a fascinating video. The first time that I heard of Robertson was just a few days ago on a TV quiz show, the question was "what did Robertson invent" the answer was to my surprise "square drive screws" and that is the name that I've known them as. They are available here but haven't really caught on.

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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-24-2019, 08:29 AM
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Interesting thread and likely news to most of us that simply take these things for granted. I have avoided slotted screws for a very long time because of their drive issues but it's common for our fancy copper/brass hinges to come with them. No idea why but they do. Square and multiple (star/square) drive screws are becoming quite common here in the USA but the drive design isn't my biggest gripe as it is the quality of the screw itself.

There are some real poor screws out there and the drive method doesn't really matter at that point. And then of course there's the fact that some of us aren't well schooled as to when a pilot hole should be drilled first and then drive the screw. Then there's the design of the thread itself where some are deeper than others. I guess the line of Kregg screws is as good an example as any. The type of thread (fine/course) is determined by the type of wood being used as well as the thickness of the boards. I for one have probably been a violator of using the proper screw more times than not.
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-24-2019, 11:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickp View Post
Most often it seems the screw and the bit were made for something else...I found the Dewalt bits fit Phillips best...depth, angle and fit to width...

And don't ya just hate long Phillips stainless...? Going in or coming out...
If you back out. Or all the way in. Often the problem is that you destroy the socket on a Phillips so badly trying to drive it in that you can't get it back out. It's possible to drive a Robertson dozens of times in any of the construction softwoods before the socket starts wearing out.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-25-2019, 08:29 AM
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Pozidrive hasn't been mentioned. Most video recorders that I serviced used them, they are similar to Philips but stay on the end of the driver.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...ws&FORM=HDRSC2

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