Going Corded - Router Forums
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post #1 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-11-2019, 06:53 PM Thread Starter
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Default Going Corded

After 10 plus years of battery operated (Cordless) tools (Mainly Drill Drivers) I have had enough. For the most part the tool itself doesn't fail but the batteries do. If I had a thousand dollars every time I needed to replace a battery in the middle of something to only plug in another under powered battery I could have retired 5 years ago.

Recently my Dewalt 18v Drill Driver clutch got stuck in the drill position so the clutch is not operetable. I have been looking and looking at drill drivers, drill drivers with impacts as well as the multi tool packages by every maker. There have been some "Good Buys" since before Thanksgiving and I almost pulled the trigger on a couple but just couldn't do it. Every time that voice keeps asking "How long are these batteries going to Last?", "2 years? 3?" "You'll be lucky if they last to the end of the warranty" I was looking at one manufacturer's 8 tool combo kit and almost bought it but then the voice started again and this time added "You already have all these tools corded and they will still be working when these cordless tools die".

With all of that said last night I made the decision to go corded. If my work required me to have cordless tools I would have the best of the best but it does not. So I have plenty of extension cords and would rather run it than run down batteries. All I really needed was a corded keyless chuck drill with a clutch and I began looking. To my surprise it was almost impossible to find one. There are several quality corded keyless chuck drill but only one that also had a clutch and that was a Black and Decker and it was 4 amps.

Sounds like the manufacturers would rather sell tools every 3 to 5 years than every 10 to 20.
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post #2 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-11-2019, 08:02 PM
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Several more of us have also made that same decision Jim. For someone working in a home shop cordless just isn't absolutely necessary. I did manage to buy some extra batteries cheap for my Milwaukees but found out recently that they are likely knockoffs. They are performing fairly well just the same and they were just under $30 each for 4 amp hr ones which was $120 cheaper each than the dealer here.

For a corded drill though I prefer to stick with a keyed chuck. I've seen a few with keyless (like a boss' DW) that did not perform well. I think corded might be a little too much power for most of the keyless ones.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-11-2019, 08:06 PM
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Agreed, Chuck...

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post #4 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-11-2019, 08:27 PM
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Interestingly enough I had 2 makita 18V drills and the batteries all went south . Bought Dewalt drills and impact drivers and touch wood , no issues .
I’ve had the Deawalt non brushless version for many years (thinking apprx 6) and everything is fine . I couldn’t imagine a corded drill this day and age , but each to his own .
I love my brushless version though and always find I’m reaching for it , as the weight is lighter and it feels more ergonomic .

One thing I don’t believe in is cordless skill saws and grinders . Always found they were useless and went dead far too quickly

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #5 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-11-2019, 09:11 PM
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This string makes you think. I have the 18 v DeWalt tools and really like how they work, but my batteries are ageing and don't hold that much of a charge. And the 20 v is nice, but one strong 4 amp battery is about the cost of a pair of 18v. The impact driver is priceless and I'll probably keep it running as long as possible, but I ran across my old 1/4 inch corded drill the other day so when my DeWalts die, I might just use it and skip the cordless. I once had a Makita battery rebuilt, but it didn't really work properly.

Batteries are a real issue these days. I inherited a small (3lb) oxygen concentrator from my brother last year, and the batteries are about $500 each, and both batteries just won't take a charge after sitting around for a year. I just use it for sleeping when traveling, so I don't really need the batteries, but I'm thinking I won't be ponying up a $1,000 any time soon.

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post #6 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-11-2019, 09:14 PM
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Never had cordless tools, except flashlights. I'm satisfied with my corded tools. If I were somewhere with no power, then I would consider cordless, but if I could just use a hand powered tool, I would go for that over cordless. But I do all work at home, so it's corded for me. I bought a new B&D corded drill somewhere around 1975. Still works, still use it almost every time I go in my shop. And still have not had to replace a battery in it.
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post #7 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-11-2019, 11:18 PM
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Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
Never had cordless tools, except flashlights. I'm satisfied with my corded tools. If I were somewhere with no power, then I would consider cordless, but if I could just use a hand powered tool, I would go for that over cordless. But I do all work at home, so it's corded for me. I bought a new B&D corded drill somewhere around 1975. Still works, still use it almost every time I go in my shop. And still have not had to replace a battery in it.
Just the opposite, The only corded I have is a flashlight. My wife likes it cause I can only go so far at night. I need a longer cord, I guess. Or a wife that's not concerned. I can barely get it to reach my beautiful widow neighbour's window. I don't want to start falling over things in the dark.
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post #8 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-12-2019, 01:25 AM
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Originally Posted by thomas1389 View Post
Just the opposite, The only corded I have is a flashlight. My wife likes it cause I can only go so far at night. I need a longer cord, I guess. Or a wife that's not concerned. I can barely get it to reach my beautiful widow neighbour's window. I don't want to start falling over things in the dark.
When you get that close your hearing is more important anyway. You need to be able to hear the sound of the receiver slamming shut so that you know when to duck and run. A light would just illuminate the target. In this case you.
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post #9 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-12-2019, 07:45 AM
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When you get that close your hearing is more important anyway. You need to be able to hear the sound of the receiver slamming shut so that you know when to duck and run. A light would just illuminate the target. In this case you.
Good thought. I'm all ready. I just got my first hearing aids in July. They're a gem. I can hear myself coming before I get there.
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post #10 of 34 (permalink) Old 12-12-2019, 08:13 AM
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Odd but I have had a Ryobi set I got for Christmas several years ago. I did have to replace the original batteries but found an online place that had blem batteries, four for $99 with free shipping and full factory warranty. I always keep my batteries charged. Separate the two so I don't have to guess. The Ryobi drill has much more torque for driving screws than my old corded Crapsman drill. The corded drill is used for pilot holes and the Ryobi drives the screws.

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