Electrical 240V 10 or 12 gauge? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-13-2019, 10:58 PM Thread Starter
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Default Electrical 240V 10 or 12 gauge?

My Grizzly jointer came this week and I need to install a NEMA 6-20 outlet in my garage which is attached to my house. The fuse box is located near the garage. On the Grizzly specs they indicate a minimum circuit size of 20 amps. This would indicate that I need to run a 12/3 line to the garage. However I have seen comments suggesting to use 10/3 instead. Is there any advantage in this situation to jump to 10 gauge? Thanks.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-13-2019, 11:03 PM
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Wiring code here says that if the run is 75 feet or more you should go one larger size. Otherwise it should be fine with the 12 gauge. Unless it has digital display or some other electrical accessory it should only need 12/2. Ground wires aren't included in the nomenclature (I guess they are assumed) so that means 2 insulated conductors plus a bare ground wire.

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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-13-2019, 11:49 PM
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Recommended Circuit size should always higher than the load on the motor. Your jointer is probably going to run a lot lower than 20 amps except on starting, so the 12 ga is appropriate . The 10 ga wire adds a little safety margin, but not a lot. The big issue is the duty cycle you are going to be asking if the jointer. If you are using it intermittently, no big deal with the 12 ga. If you are going to be pushing the machine for hours at a time the cord will get hotter and internal resistance increases. Having a larger Gage wire might then make sense.

I tend to be more conservative, so I would run 10 ga if the price wasn't significantly higher. The key is what you can fit into the service connection on the tool and what you're willing to spend
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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-14-2019, 12:06 AM
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I agree w/ Charles but believe 10GA is the better way to go and Doug makes valid sense....

xx/2-w/G wire will have a white conductor as well as a black one and a ground...
any exposed white conductor will need a color change to either red or black using shrink tube and not w/ colored tape when used in a 220V circuit...

xx/3-w/G wire will have a red conductor in addition to the black and white as well as a ground and is the wire most often used for 220V circuits...
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Last edited by Stick486; 12-14-2019 at 12:22 AM.
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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-14-2019, 12:26 AM
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12/3 to your garage . I’d step that up , as there’s in rush current and distance to consider , plus you may want to run a dust collector at the same time .
I don’t know how far you have to go but I’d go with 8 gauge minimum. I had 10/3 going to my garage and couldn’t run a 5hp compressor unfortunately

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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-14-2019, 12:48 AM
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you need separate circuits for each machine Rick...
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-14-2019, 01:40 AM
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Stick's right Rick. You aren't allowed to run two 240 volt machines from the same breaker. You should have run a larger gauge wire to a sub panel instead where you could have multiple machines coming off that panel.

The larger wire for continuously running machines is I think part of the commercial wiring code and not residential code. In a commercial setting it's assumed that a machine could run continuously through a shift (and also be pushed hard) and the load should be calculated at only 80% of circuit capacity in that case. If you had a 15 amp load in that situation you would have to up to 12 gauge and 20 amp breaker and if it was 20 you'd have to go up to 10 gauge and 30 amp breaker, etc. It would be pretty hard to run a jointer that hard in a home work shop. You'd literally need 3 people running it to work it that hard. One guy loading onto the infeed table, the operator, and one guy taking the boards off.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-14-2019, 01:42 AM Thread Starter
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If I decided to go with a 100 amp sub box what size SER wire should I go with? Is aluminum safe to use? 3-3-3-5 copper is outrageously expensive. #1 or 2 in aluminum? Thanks.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-14-2019, 01:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed3443 View Post
If I decided to go with a 100 amp sub box what size SER wire should I go with? Is aluminum safe to use? 3-3-3-5 copper is outrageously expensive. #1 or 2 in aluminum? Thanks.
I don't recommend Aluminum electrical wire for any thing including service to the shop.
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-14-2019, 02:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Stoops View Post
I don't recommend Aluminum electrical wire for any thing including service to the shop.
Herb
I hate aluminum,but my electrician said itís fine for the mains , just donít use it for branches .
Your house has an aluminum main feed

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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