Jigs to hold material on workbench - Router Forums
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2020, 11:53 AM Thread Starter
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Default Jigs to hold material on workbench

I saw this on Fine woodworking and thought it was an excellent tutorial on various jigs to hold wood in place.
https://www.finewoodworking.com/2016...k-holding-jigs
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2020, 12:27 PM
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There's some good tips in there. If you have dog holes in the bench then you can cover most of those with dogs and the end vise. Mine has dog holes but one problem with having dog holes is that small parts like screws tend to seek them out so that they can fall through into another dimension never to be found again. I often wish I had another solid top bench just for assembly for that reason.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2020, 12:29 PM
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Wow, 86 pages of them, one for everyone. Good Post.
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2020, 03:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
There's some good tips in there. If you have dog holes in the bench then you can cover most of those with dogs and the end vise. Mine has dog holes but one problem with having dog holes is that small parts like screws tend to seek them out so that they can fall through into another dimension never to be found again. I often wish I had another solid top bench just for assembly for that reason.
solid sheet goods cover..

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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-18-2020, 04:00 PM
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thanks...
great post..

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 10:32 AM
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For someone who doesn't do a lot of handwork, that video was inspirational and instructional. I even re-mounted my vice last night. I'll be making some of those jigs soon. thanks.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 11:25 AM
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I get those tips regularly and I just watched this video last night. I agree that there are some useful and inexpensive jigs in here. I teach my students to use a bench hook and we build them so they have to take home. I marked this video to make some of these once my router table is finished, almost there, installed drawers yesterday.

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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-21-2020, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
There's some good tips in there. If you have dog holes in the bench then you can cover most of those with dogs and the end vise. Mine has dog holes but one problem with having dog holes is that small parts like screws tend to seek them out so that they can fall through into another dimension never to be found again. I often wish I had another solid top bench just for assembly for that reason.
They are partying it up with all the socks that never seem to make it out of the dryer with their mates....
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-21-2020, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
There's some good tips in there. If you have dog holes in the bench then you can cover most of those with dogs and the end vise. Mine has dog holes but one problem with having dog holes is that small parts like screws tend to seek them out so that they can fall through into another dimension never to be found again. I often wish I had another solid top bench just for assembly for that reason.
I'm right there with you, CC - dog holes can be a problem. I have a smaller work surface but it's not big enough for assembly. I'm gonna get a sheet of Luan to put down for that. I also use a paper roll to lay down for finishing. Helps some...my best surface for checking flat and square is still the table saw.

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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 01-22-2020, 11:26 AM
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I've made a few of these jigs, but lately I've been using vacuum chucks for most of this kind of work. I use both the Rockler and/or shop made vacuum chucks, depending on the shape of the work piece. An HVAC vacuum pump from Harbor Freight with an air filter in the line to keep saw dust out of the vacuum pump, some 1/4" fittings and 1/4" plastic air line is all that is needed. I just screw the chucks to the work bench and connect the lines between the chucks and vacuum pump, turn on the pump and drop the work piece on the vacuum chucks. They hold the piece very tightly, even more if the area of the vacuum chuck can be made larger. I use closed cell Weather stripping with a peel and stick backing to form the seal on my shop made chucks and it lasts nearly forever.

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