Woods for newby projects - Page 2 - Router Forums
 69Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-27-2020, 06:55 AM
Registered User
 
Nickp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Nick
Posts: 4,249
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by newbie2wood View Post
I use pallet wood for some projects.

I really like it for sample/display only pieces, practice pieces and shop only projects.

Just have to be careful which pallets you use as some are better left in the trash.

Here are guides I use when deciding if a pallet is worth taking.

I also have a pallet tool to break them down. I used to use a hammer and nail puller which took about a 1/2 or more to tear down a normal sized pallet. With the pallet tool, it takes me about 5 -10 mins to rip one down.

Your post deserves more than a "Like"...

Good guide and excellent caution on how to select...

Between yours and @Stick486 post, it's "everything you always wanted to know about pallets but were afraid to ask"

Good post...thanks

Nick

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
GIVE A MAN A FISH and you feed him for a day.
TEACH HIM HOW TO FISH and you feed him for his life time.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Nickp is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-27-2020, 06:57 AM
Registered User
 
Nickp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Nick
Posts: 4,249
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
some things to consider about pallets....

.

Really good guide...thanks...
Stick486 and mifon like this.

Nick

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
GIVE A MAN A FISH and you feed him for a day.
TEACH HIM HOW TO FISH and you feed him for his life time.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Nickp is online now  
post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-27-2020, 07:29 AM
Registered User
 
Bstrom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Country: United States
First Name: Brian
Posts: 398
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mifon View Post
I have been accumulating equipment for my woodshop over the last year or so either by taking advantage of used equipment available in my area, or taking advantage of sales on new eqpt. Now that I have accumulated and set up my shop I am ready to start some projects. The problem, however, is that I do not have a good source of wood. I would like to build some small bedside tables, book shelves, etc. For these items to fit with our present furniture, they will have to be stained a darker (mahogany) color. I expect to make mistakes as I learn from doing. That's why I hesitate to invest in expensive hardwood stock which might be more appropriate for the end product. So, the question is, can I accomplish what I'm trying to do with big box store stock such as poplar (avoiding the ugly green heart wood). The price is right and it's available in many widths and lengths. Or, what would you more experienced wood workers suggest???

I've lurked on here reading the great advice that you share for quite sometime. I appreciate all your comments and help and say THANKS in advance!!

Mike in TN
I see you are in Mt. Juliet - middle TN. You should find a sawyer selling all sorts of wood on Craigslist. I get my hardwood for a third of the cost retailers and kiln dried wood seller charge. Also, look for a local woodworkers guild to find local resources as well.
Nickp, mifon and Herb Stoops like this.

Common Man Woodworking
Powell, TN
Bstrom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-27-2020, 10:41 AM
Registered User
 
roofner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Gary
Posts: 916
 
Default

I build mostly out of pine its cheap and looks good in a paint grade project or clear coat. Here are a couple examples.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1410592a.jpg
Views:	8
Size:	629.6 KB
ID:	383897  

Click image for larger version

Name:	P1410979a.jpg
Views:	9
Size:	1.15 MB
ID:	383899  

Nickp, Stick486, Ed3443 and 2 others like this.
roofner is offline  
post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-27-2020, 10:57 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Country: United States
First Name: Jessie
Posts: 116
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickp View Post
Your post deserves more than a "Like"...

Good guide and excellent caution on how to select...

Between yours and @Stick486 post, it's "everything you always wanted to know about pallets but were afraid to ask"

Good post...thanks
Thanks Nick,

It's not for everyone, nor is it for every project. But if you pay attention to how it was made and where it came from they are safe to use.

In fact, you can also purchase new pallets very inexpensively.

Here are more codes to be aware of if you are considering using pallets - Please make sure you see the stamp, if not leave the pallet and find another...

A good place to find used pallets are at a local newspaper site. They typically have DB-HT-KD pallets because the paper can not be contaminated before it goes to the printing process and they usually have dozens available.

Just remember to always ask before taking a pallet. I have several businesses in my area that have given and when see me coming, direct me to their pallet stacks of which I can take.

The reason is, many businesses like the big box stores have a company that picks up and recycles them for a fee.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	treatment-codes-2.jpg
Views:	7
Size:	104.3 KB
ID:	383901  

Nickp, Ed3443 and mifon like this.
newbie2wood is offline  
post #16 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-27-2020, 11:00 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,895
 
Default

Re: red alder- I saw a booth at a woodworking show once where they were selling cutting boards made from red alder and it came from the coast. There's lots on Vancouver Island I know. Must be fairly tough wood.

If you have a jointer, at least a 6" you can make short pieces of lumber from green wood. I do it often. I like to debark the wood first as there is grit hiding in the bark sometimes. You flatten 3 sides to 90* of each other and then you can start sawing pieces off on the table saw. By flipping the wood over after the first cut you can cut 6" thick with a 10" saw. Thicker if you get a bandsaw with 12" throat and I sometimes only flatten 1 side if I'm running it through the bandsaw and just freehand the first pass. There are some really interesting non-commercial woods you can obtain this way that are sometimes really interesting for color and grain. Two of my favorites here are hawthorne and Siberian elm.

One thing to remember about making furniture is that you often only need a few long and /or thick pieces and the rest is usually quite short as in less than 2'. You can also laminate lots of short pieces together to make panels like you see at Ikea. As someone mentioned if you can find a small hardwood mill nearby you should be able to pick up trim ends and short pieces cheap. They often have a hard time getting rid of pieces like that.
Nickp, Stick486, Ed3443 and 1 others like this.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is online now  
post #17 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-27-2020, 03:44 PM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 14,886
 
Default

Our HS shop teacher referred to (Red) Alder as 'The poor man's Maple'. It's always been a local manufacturer's choice for chesterfield (sofa) frames.
https://www.wood-database.com/red-alder/
Herb Stoops likes this.
DaninVan is online now  
post #18 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-27-2020, 07:55 PM
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 18,012
 
Default

The biggest problem with big box hardwoods is that they are often warped and are pre finished to the most common size, 3/4 inch. So be very careful when selecting it that there are no serious twists, warps and other defects. I occasionally use narrow pieces of poplar for face frames, but rarely find enough to do something like a glued up table top.

I used a lot of kiln dried pine to learn on, mostly 2x6 with nice grain. It is easy to work with, but doesn't stain all that well. But you can resaw it pretty easily, even with a table saw. Then plane it down to exact sizes.

I haven't had that much luck finding good hardwood furniture where I live, and you have to remove the finish and mill it to size.

I finally found a really good mill and lumber supply after attending a Rockler demonstration, and met a number of other woodworkers there who turned me on to a supplier. I have to drive almost an hour to get there, but it's worth it. They also carry Baltic Birch ply in 5x5 sheets, and I tend to use that for flat surfaces. My favorite project is made of BB ply with poplar face frames. Shelf edging is poplar, and it's painted a slightly off white to fit our color scheme, but it could just as easily have been stained dark.

I make picture frames for my wife, and for that I make the trip down for profiled stock, and I most like the Cherry. Unfortunately with any 10 ft piece only about 7 feet will be straight enough to use for a frame. I do have 4ft piece of 8inch 7/4 hard maple that will be cut and milled for a frame. To make an end table I'd need one more piece like it, and the piece I have was only about $23 bucks.

With HD poplar or their other hardwoods, if you're willing to plane it down to less than 3/4 for a top, then it will do the job. One other thing, for Oak, look for an oak stair step, they're about an inch thick and amazingly straight grain.
mifon and graeme.c.payne like this.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
DesertRatTom is online now  
post #19 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-29-2020, 09:56 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Herb Stoops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Herb
Posts: 8,037
 
Default

Years ago I found a small WoodMizer mill about a 1/2 hr. from home that I used to visit all the time. I took my chainsaw and he let me go through the slab pile and cut out anything I wanted. The slabs usually yield at least one board when recut on the band saw. But the most important part is that I got to know him well and if he had a board or 2 of lumber left over from an order he would give it to me. Or he might request I make him a shelf for his office,or a end table for his deck etc. I would happily make him stuff for free and he was more than generous in the lumber he gave me. He let his logs set for a year in his lot before he sawed them. Most of the lumber went to custom high end builders doing expensive houses. The scrap was usually wet from laying out in the rain, so after I resawed it I had to air dry it. he got so he would give me a heads up the day he was sawing so I could come out and get it fresh off the saw.
There was an old burnt out Hippie with an old beat up Toyota PU that would sit off to the side on a stool and take a bucked off butt from a log and carve whimsical houses while puffing on his weed. He would take them to town and sell them to homeowners for garden ornaments.
The Sawyer still lives there,not sawing anymore, built a brewery and now does custom brewing and home delivery.
DaninVan, Ed3443 and mifon like this.
Herb Stoops is online now  
post #20 of 21 (permalink) Old 03-29-2020, 10:04 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Herb Stoops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Herb
Posts: 8,037
 
Default

Another good place to find lumber is by joining a woodworking club. I know from experience that several times a year one of the members will close up shop and give the club members first crack at the tools and lumber. Also we have numerous offers all year long from heirs calling to see if there is anyone interested in buying lumber from the family members shop. It usually goes for 1/2 the price of new and there is usually some really good material being sold. I have scored well on occasion doing that. I am usually generous with my offers so as not to take advantage of the person left the job of disposing of the shop.
Herb
DaninVan and mifon like this.
Herb Stoops is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome