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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-08-2020, 06:02 PM Thread Starter
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Steve another fairly cheap addition to the sharpening arsenal is the green sticks of honing compound. I got mine from Lee Valley but I've seen it at other places where buffing supplies are sold. https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...d?item=05M0801 I see it's gone up in price. I got mine for $12 or less. You can charge a felt wheel like I do or put some on wood or leather like I've seen Paul Sellers do and just stroke your chisel on same as you sharpen. That compound is the equivalent of 8000 grit so it begins to polish the metal. I've had my stick for 15 to 20 years and I'm maybe 1/3 of the way through it.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-08-2020, 10:43 PM
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Thanks Chuck
Yeah I have seen those in various videos. Seems a little less common here in Australia so I'll likely have to order it. Does the colour mean much? I've seen some advertised being a lighter shade of green than the Lee Valley one you linked to.
Just wondered if there were differences (or perhaps ones to avoid).
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-08-2020, 11:53 PM Thread Starter
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The different colors indicate grit size but I'm not sure there are variations in green. Most are very different. I have one that is black that is much coarser and there are some finer ones for jewelry and polishing plastics. I forget which ones are for what but there is a bright blue, red, white, and brown.
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-15-2020, 08:59 AM
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Points well made all!! A testament to the fact that its more a matter of preference than one of tools or materials used. As Nickp mentioned, technique is key, regardless of mediums used. It aint' gonna work, no matter how hard you try if your not doing it right!!!!!! Over the years I have tried Cherryville Chucks freehand method on stones and paper and I just suck at it. I can tell what I'm doing wrong by looking at the end product, but for whatever reason I can't correct the issue by modifying my technique. Once I finally admitted that I suck at it, I moved on *LOL*..but it certainly wasn't for the lack of trying.

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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-15-2020, 11:56 AM
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Good information and methods all round. Once I properly sharpen my iron and chisels, flatten the back, I just never let them get dull. It only takes a few strokes on a medium then fine diamond "stone" to bring the edge back to perfect every few uses, plus a few flat strokes to deburr the edge. If can I shave off arm hair, they're ready to use. It helps that I paid the price of really good quality planes and chisels. I occasionally polish with a leather strop attached to a block of wood with that green stuff. In college I worked selling jewelry for awhile, and we used Jeweler's rouge to polish gold and silver jewelry, really made the stuff shine with any scratching--have no idea what the grit was, but it had to be ultra fine not to scratch gold.

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post #16 of 16 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 07:30 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoSkies57 View Post
Points well made all!! A testament to the fact that its more a matter of preference than one of tools or materials used. As Nickp mentioned, technique is key, regardless of mediums used. It aint' gonna work, no matter how hard you try if your not doing it right!!!!!! Over the years I have tried Cherryville Chucks freehand method on stones and paper and I just suck at it. I can tell what I'm doing wrong by looking at the end product, but for whatever reason I can't correct the issue by modifying my technique. Once I finally admitted that I suck at it, I moved on *LOL*..but it certainly wasn't for the lack of trying.
Seemingly off topic- when I was a mid to older teen one of the neighbor kids got a pool table. An old one that had been top of the line around 1900 but was a bit off by the time I'm referring to. Still it was fun and the lot of us that general age spent hours in his garage playing on it. And we started getting pretty good. Or so we thought until his next door neighbor who was at least 20 years older than we were came over one day to see what we were up to. Despite the fact he hadn't played in years he was still at least as good as we were when we were shooting our best. He told us a story about how he had mentored under someone when he was young and one of the exercises he was made to do was hold a handkerchief between his elbow and his side while he was stroking the cue. If the handkerchief dropped he got his mentor's foot up his rear end.

Back to the point. That story stuck with me over the years. Quite often our failings are a due to a lack of good form. In many endeavors, if your elbow is flailing around like a flag in the wind then you'll have trouble getting good results. If you're having problems getting consistent results then examine the form you are using. That may be the culprit.

Sometimes nothing helps. We all have different physicalities and sometimes your body just won't do what your brain is asking it to do. Especially as you get older. I did see a home made version of the Veritas type jig which you can make for pennies. Here is the link: https://ibuildit.ca/plans/chisel-and...harpening-jig/ There is a Youtube video for it too. I saw another video by woodworker Garrett Hack a while back and he used a digital angle box to set the angle for honing. He zeroed it on his sharpening medium and then stuck it on the plane blade and adjusted the jig until he got the 25* angle he wanted. That eliminates the single use angle setting jig.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.

Last edited by Cherryville Chuck; 09-16-2020 at 07:33 PM.
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