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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-23-2009, 12:33 PM Thread Starter
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Here is a thought and I wonder what you think of it:

I am not worried about the large chips, etc on the floor. I am concerned about the very fine dust in the air, especially sanding dust. With more than 50% of project time spent on sanding, this is a huge issue. So here is what I think I will try and let me know if this is a dumb idea:

My workshop is in a two car garage. I use half of it. I will build a downdraft sanding station. In it, I will put in a high throughput furnace blower. I will open a hole in the garage wall and let the blower blow directly into that hole and outside. This hole in the wall will be more like a small window, 12X12 or larger. This sanding table should be large, something like 48X48, and can be used as a table saw extension table. I don't plan to use any filter in the sanding station, I just want to blow whatever is in the air out.

What I don't want is to "collect" the dust. I just want to pull them down and blow them out before they reach my nose.

Gooroos, is this a dumb idea or will it work?
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-23-2009, 01:04 PM
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It is not a bad idea other than when you have the blower on all the heat or cold in the shop will be sucked outside. So, if you have any kind of heating or cooling in your shop it will be totally negated when the table fan is in use.

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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-23-2009, 01:28 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by curiousgeorge View Post
It is not a bad idea other than when you have the blower on all the heat or cold in the shop will be sucked outside. So, if you have any kind of heating or cooling in your shop it will be totally negated when the table fan is in use.
I am in Iowa, so for half of the year, I will be fine. In the extreme cold winter days, (minus 20 F) I won't be able to work in there anyway. For the "warmer" winter days, (we consider 0 F warm here) I should be able to run the sanding table fan with my heater running at the same time, and it will get cold fast, then I will jump back into the house and let the fan run on a timer and suck all dust out and go back in again. With a big enough fan, it should be able to circulate all air in a few minutes. I can jump in and out of the garage like a monkey, repeat this once every hour or so and get some work done.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-23-2009, 07:21 PM
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Hello, and welcome! This is where you would want to keep the warm air inside. I would make a filter box to catch as much dust as i can. I know that you aren't interested in collecting, but it will save a bundle of hea$t

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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 09-23-2009, 07:48 PM
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Kevin,

Bill Pentz has a great site on dust collecting and has a page dedicated to downdraft sanding tables and how much air is required to capture the fines. Here's a link...

Bill's Cyclone Dust Collection Research - Dust Collection Downdraft Table

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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-01-2009, 09:12 AM
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We are in the process of installing a dust control system in our shop, I was wondering is there a benefit of having the main lines run overhead or at machine level? I will be using a pin router which can produce alot of chips and dust, having to move that stuff up to 6+ feet instead of only out the back would seem to cause some of it to not move. We have a Jet 1100 CFM dust collector with 2 4" ports in a Y coming out, would it be better to use two or make it a single 6" then branch off?

Just needing some advice.

Thankd
David
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-01-2009, 09:44 AM
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Hi David

I would suggest to run them overhead...and use the 4" size,along the over head and drop the hose from them (Branch off from the main lines to the machines ) from the Y leave one port for the machines that you want to roll up to it..so you run a 2 1/2" hose outside the shop to clean out the truck/car etc. plus put as many gates in that you can.

If you have the room put in the trash can filter just b/4 the Y fitting...

=============

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Originally Posted by drallred View Post
We are in the process of installing a dust control system in our shop, I was wondering is there a benefit of having the main lines run overhead or at machine level? I will be using a pin router which can produce alot of chips and dust, having to move that stuff up to 6+ feet instead of only out the back would seem to cause some of it to not move. We have a Jet 1100 CFM dust collector with 2 4" ports in a Y coming out, would it be better to use two or make it a single 6" then branch off?

Just needing some advice.

Thankd
David



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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-01-2009, 02:32 PM
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Kevin,
If you do a lot of work, You will have to deal with the dust. A DC system collects sawdust as well as the dust. I fill two 55 gal barrels a week, don't think I would like all that piled up around the shop. Fresh sawdust will kill grass.

As for the ducting, the main reason it is overhead, is because we need the wall space for shelves, storage, etc. I ran mine at 4 foot as much as I could. When I researched mine, I was told to use 6" but I chose 4" because I wanted to use 4" PVC. (with a grd wire)
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-06-2009, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Old_Chipper View Post
Kevin,
If you do a lot of work, You will have to deal with the dust. A DC system collects sawdust as well as the dust. I fill two 55 gal barrels a week, don't think I would like all that piled up around the shop. Fresh sawdust will kill grass.
Thanks all for your response.

I am strictly a hobbyist. I complete one project every two or three months, sometimes even longer. A table, a bed, a chest of drawers, stuff like that. For this much work, it is hard to justify the expense and time to set up a good dust collection system. So I was just looking for a quick dirty cheap way to keep myself from eating the very fine dust. I read the link Jim provided and it seems the idea should work, if I don't care about collecting and just blow everything out directly. I guess I will have to try it to know for sure.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 10-06-2009, 04:20 PM
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Look in Wood magazine for the Harbor Freight page. Get the DC for $139. Then get whatever PVC pipe you need, a few gates and fittings, and some flex hose. Probably another $100 or so. Put it together for a nice DC system.

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