Slightly Different Workbench - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 04:01 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 18
 
Default Slightly Different Workbench

G'day Everyone,
Thought I'd share some details of the workbench I built 9 years ago and which has served me well ever since.
I was messing around with wooden boats at that time and had a need for a robust bench that I could easily transport back and forth from my shed to the boatyard. Robust and easily transportable seemed to be incompatible ideas, so I decided to make a really solid and heavy bench that I could easily dismantle.
The base is held together by truss rods, with the stretchers located in position by loose dowels. (No glue.) The top is extremely heavy, and sits on top of the base located by positioning blocks, but not fastened to the base.
The top is in three pieces, which when assembled, are held together by endcaps, with dowels and coach screws.
The whole assembly can easily be disassembled into manageable sections in less than 15 minutes, simply by removing the coach screws in the end caps and undoing the nuts on 4 of the truss rods.

The difference from a conventional bench, is that I left a large gap in the top, slightly towards one side. The idea was to make it a little more router friendly in being able to clamp workpieces of greatly varying sizes to the top. I originally had a filler piece that I could insert to make the top one piece, but I discarded that after the first six months. I found it unnecessary and more often than not, I had it removed.

I also built a leg vise with a foot adjustment lock that I've so far not come across anywhere else. The bottom of the leg has a 1 inch dowel that slides through a 1&1/8 inch hole in the base of the bench. The locking device is a piece of wood about 8 x 3 with a 1&1/8 inch hole bored at one end. The other end has a 3 x 4 inch piece of wood fixed at right angles. ( An L shape.) It is placed on the dowel, between the leg vice and the bench, with the foot closest to the bench. All that is required to set the leg vice is to place the workpiece in the jaws, adjust the bottom so that it remains parallel with the leg of the base and using your foot, move the lock so that the foot of the lock contacts the base. Then tighten the vice screw. With the screw acting as a fulcrum, the clamping effort is shared with the force on the workpiece. The more force that is applied, the greater the locking force. It has never ever slipped. Release is a simple as slackening off the vice screw and removing the workpiece The lock will then be free. Gives a very large range of adjustment, is quick to use and best of all, no bending down
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3325.jpg
Views:	82
Size:	317.7 KB
ID:	29722  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3318.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	380.0 KB
ID:	29723  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3315.jpg
Views:	65
Size:	312.7 KB
ID:	29724  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3310.jpg
Views:	59
Size:	325.1 KB
ID:	29725  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3308.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	322.0 KB
ID:	29727  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3301.jpg
Views:	62
Size:	443.9 KB
ID:	29728  

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3323.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	339.7 KB
ID:	29729  

diggerop is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 04:10 PM
Retired Moderator
 
TwoSkies57's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Bill
Posts: 6,019
   
Default

Henry...

The TRULY classic workbench is one that can tell a story!

I believe the expression is "Good on ya". *S*

bill
TwoSkies57 is offline  
post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 04:17 PM
Registered User
 
dutchman 46's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Howard
Posts: 2,825
 
Thumbs up Hello!

Quote:
Originally Posted by diggerop View Post
G'day Everyone,
Thought I'd share some details of the workbench I built 9 years ago and which has served me well ever since.
I was messing around with wooden boats at that time and had a need for a robust bench that I could easily transport back and forth from my shed to the boatyard. Robust and easily transportable seemed to be incompatible ideas, so I decided to make a really solid and heavy bench that I could easily dismantle.
The base is held together by truss rods, with the stretchers located in position by loose dowels. (No glue.) The top is extremely heavy, and sits on top of the base located by positioning blocks, but not fastened to the base.
The top is in three pieces, which when assembled, are held together by endcaps, with dowels and coach screws.
The whole assembly can easily be disassembled into manageable sections in less than 15 minutes, simply by removing the coach screws in the end caps and undoing the nuts on 4 of the truss rods.

The difference from a conventional bench, is that I left a large gap in the top, slightly towards one side. The idea was to make it a little more router friendly in being able to clamp workpieces of greatly varying sizes to the top. I originally had a filler piece that I could insert to make the top one piece, but I discarded that after the first six months. I found it unnecessary and more often than not, I had it removed.

I also built a leg vise with a foot adjustment lock that I've so far not come across anywhere else. The bottom of the leg has a 1 inch dowel that slides through a 1&1/8 inch hole in the base of the bench. The locking device is a piece of wood about 8 x 3 with a 1&1/8 inch hole bored at one end. The other end has a 3 x 4 inch piece of wood fixed at right angles. ( An L shape.) It is placed on the dowel, between the leg vice and the bench, with the foot closest to the bench. All that is required to set the leg vice is to place the workpiece in the jaws, adjust the bottom so that it remains parallel with the leg of the base and using your foot, move the lock so that the foot of the lock contacts the base. Then tighten the vice screw. With the screw acting as a fulcrum, the clamping effort is shared with the force on the workpiece. The more force that is applied, the greater the locking force. It has never ever slipped. Release is a simple as slackening off the vice screw and removing the workpiece The lock will then be free. Gives a very large range of adjustment, is quick to use and best of all, no bending down
Hello Henry I like your bench and your pictures. You said that it is heavy. How long did it take to set up? Really like the concept. I will look over the bench vise that you made, I think that it would make a great vice. Thanks for the post!

John 3:16

Please fill out your profile, It helps us to know you better
dutchman 46 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 04:46 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 18
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dutchman 46 View Post
Hello Henry I like your bench and your pictures. You said that it is heavy. How long did it take to set up? Really like the concept. I will look over the bench vise that you made, I think that it would make a great vice. Thanks for the post!
G'day Howard,
On average, setup can be done in under 20 minutes without straining yourself.(When I was moving it frequently, I could dismantle in 10 minutes and assemble in 15, but that was me trying to see just how quickly it could be done.) All the pieces are numbered where they fit together, but it is just that little bit slower than taking it apart.

The base is pine and quite light. The top is extremely heavy. The section with the conventional vise is the heaviest and just manageable. The top is Douglas Fir glulam with heavy Jarrah surrounds. I intended to fasten it to the base, but found it wasn't necessary. It never moves, even if i jump on the overhanging end.

I built it without plans using a handsaw, drill, and a router with a straight edge to joint and trim. (That was all I had at the time.) It's as solid now as the day I built it. In the first year, I had to tighten the truss rods a couple of times, haven't needed to do that again for a long time.
diggerop is offline  
post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 04:49 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 18
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoSkies57 View Post
Henry...

The TRULY classic workbench is one that can tell a story!

I believe the expression is "Good on ya". *S*

bill
Thanks cobber : )
diggerop is offline  
post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 04:55 PM
Retired Moderator
 
Bob N's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Bob
Posts: 5,688
     
Default

Henry,

What a great bench, well designed and sturdy for sure. You are a neander to be looked up to with that kind of craftsmanship.

Thanks for taking the time to share it with us. You did good....... VERY good!
Bob N is offline  
post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 05:02 PM
Forum Contributor
 
xplorx4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 10,671
 
Default

Very interesting, fine craftsmanship to be sure.

Wisdom: Where experience and knowledge combine and become one.

"We are all one decision away from Stupid!!"

Lamentations 3:22-23

"How often we sacrifice the permanent plans of God on the altar of immediate solutions"

I have a very good memory, just short is all.
xplorx4 is offline  
post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 05:33 PM
Registered User
 
dutchman 46's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Howard
Posts: 2,825
 
Default

Thats a great bench Henry, That says alot about your design and craftsmanship. And all with hand tools. Thanks again for the post. I am sure that you have other stories to tell us. I am not ever going to show you mine. Ha Ha.

John 3:16

Please fill out your profile, It helps us to know you better
dutchman 46 is offline  
post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 06:19 PM
Retired Moderator
 
Hamlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Country: United States
First Name: Ken
Posts: 3,437
 
Send a message via MSN to Hamlin
Default

Hi Henry,

I can't add much more than what everyone else has said. Excellent job!! IMHO, it follows the K.I.S.S. rule to a "T". Again, excellent looking table.

Ken

***Please fill in your profile, at least your location. As this will help us help you better.***

"A VETERAN"
"Whether active duty, retired, national guard or reserve - is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America", for an amount of "up to and including my life". That is HONOR, and there are way too many people in this country who no longer understand it." -Author Unknown

Hamlin is offline  
post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 11-08-2009, 10:30 PM
Retired Moderator
 
CanuckGal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Country: Canada
First Name: Deb
Posts: 3,132
 
Send a message via MSN to CanuckGal
Default

No shortage of "sturdy" in that bench. Excellent plan!

EGO postulo , EGO venalicium , EGO incidere.
I measured, I marked, I cut.
Latin instructions for firewood.

Get the Router Workshop Video Series Online!
CanuckGal is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Workbench Pictures -Sam- Show N' Tell 22 09-16-2009 07:11 PM
My new workbench kartracer63 Show N' Tell 9 03-25-2009 01:14 PM
Workbench I Microsuffer Microsuffer's Follies 8 03-16-2009 11:46 AM
workbench dogs Bogydave Starting Off 13 11-16-2008 04:46 AM
For Sale: Steel Workbench by Gorilla Rack -Sam- Woodworking Classifieds 2 08-29-2005 10:54 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome