Chipping/Tear out/Pitting? on round over on an edge - Router Forums
 13Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 01-16-2010, 04:29 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
First Name: Bernard
Posts: 5
 
Default Chipping/Tear out/Pitting? on round over on an edge

Anyone have tips to prevent chipping/tear out/pitting/whatever its called when rounding over perpendicular to the grain? First time for me using actual wood, been working with just MDF for small projects before. The wood is pine and I'm using a ryobi 1/2" round over bit and a Hitachi M12VC router in the fixed base. Here's a picture of edge with the pitting (hopefully it shows).



Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
-Bernard
bbmonster is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 01-16-2010, 08:09 PM
Registered User
 
allthunbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Country: Canada
First Name: Ron
Posts: 2,881
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bbmonster View Post
Anyone have tips to prevent chipping/tear out/pitting/whatever its called when rounding over perpendicular to the grain? First time for me using actual wood, been working with just MDF for small projects before. The wood is pine and I'm using a ryobi 1/2" round over bit and a Hitachi M12VC router in the fixed base. Here's a picture of edge with the pitting (hopefully it shows).



Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
-Bernard
We've got a whole bunch of names but tear-out is appropriate.

Use a sharp bit. Don't be so aggressive with your cuts. Take smaller "bites." Starting from the right make shallow divots every few inches to the left then, route from left to right. use a straight edge guide rather than a bearing. Don't cut to final dimensions, sneak up on it. Come close and finish with sand paper. Even scrapers can't help when end grain is going all over the place. BTW, keeping different size bearings in your bit kit will help "adjust" the depth of cut to allow for stuff like this.

The experts will be along shortly to correct my babble and give you the real goods. This is just to push your query back up to the top of the stack.

Allthunbs
allthunbs is offline  
post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 01-17-2010, 01:15 AM
Forum Contributor
 
xplorx4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 10,671
 
Default

Ditto Ron, try a better quality bit. I have used lesser quality bits and some of the better quality bits and the difference is night and day. Check out Router Bits – Rockler – Hundreds of Top-Quality Bits for Every Imaginable Purpose!, Oak Park Enterprises Ltd. - Router Table, Router, Router Bits, Router Jigs, Router Accessories: Home, MLCS Router Bits and Woodworking Products

Wisdom: Where experience and knowledge combine and become one.

"We are all one decision away from Stupid!!"

Lamentations 3:22-23

"How often we sacrifice the permanent plans of God on the altar of immediate solutions"

I have a very good memory, just short is all.
xplorx4 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 01-17-2010, 01:26 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
First Name: Bj
Posts: 23,786
       
Default

Hi Bernard

That's very common for pine ( softwoods) run the speed up on the router and make more than one pass.. 3 best for softwoods..

======

Quote:
Originally Posted by bbmonster View Post
Anyone have tips to prevent chipping/tear out/pitting/whatever its called when rounding over perpendicular to the grain? First time for me using actual wood, been working with just MDF for small projects before. The wood is pine and I'm using a ryobi 1/2" round over bit and a Hitachi M12VC router in the fixed base. Here's a picture of edge with the pitting (hopefully it shows).



Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
-Bernard



"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
http://www.routerforums.com/search.php?searchid=944097


bobj3 is offline  
post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 01-17-2010, 05:30 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
First Name: Bernard
Posts: 5
 
Default

Thanks all. Will pick up a better round over bit and run the router at a higher speed (noticed I had the speed set at 1/2 max when I used it today). I took several passes, dropping the bit by 1/8" each time, so my guess my problem is the bit and speed.
bbmonster is offline  
post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-26-2018, 02:55 AM
Registered User
 
fmakrancy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Country: United States
First Name: N/a
Posts: 8
 
Default

I am having the same problem. I have a production setup where I produce about 40 10" X 4" X 3/4" backings with 6 sides. I get the same exact issue, but always on only one side -which happens to be the left 45 degree angle at the top. Sanding is killing my fingers and extremely time consuming. I purchased brand new CMT orange bits and got away from the HFT junk I was using -but even with the brand new CMT Contractor orange ogee bit, I get the same issue on the same corner every time. I am ready to pull my hair out! I have tried making multiple passes -going to the extent of 5, sometimes 6 per time. Some are worse than others. My router does not have a speed control but it is a brand new Kobalt that I got from Lowes. The other 5 corners -including end grain are absolutely beautiful and require no sanding. Anyone have any other suggestions for my problem?

Thanks!
-Fred
fmakrancy is offline  
post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-26-2018, 03:05 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 27,044
 
Default

Welcome N/A
you using a table or free hand routering???
suggest you climb cut...

.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf R5 Climb-Cutting Versus Chip-Cutting.pdf (176.1 KB, 21 views)
File Type: pdf R5 CLIMB CUTTING.pdf (74.4 KB, 18 views)
File Type: pdf woodsmith-184-avoiding-router-table-tearout.pdf (292.2 KB, 22 views)
Semipro likes this.

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy
Stick486 is online now  
post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-26-2018, 08:15 AM
RouterForums.com User
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,812
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
Welcome N/A
you using a table or free hand routering???
suggest you climb cut...

.
some timbers especially Pine do tend to have that problem. As has been said, a sharp bit (which you have) must be combined with slow feed and has also been mentioned, a climb cut can be tried but if on a router table the work-piece must be held securely otherwise it can be flung across the shop. If handheld it must be clamped for the same reason.

Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is offline  
post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-26-2018, 12:01 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,645
 
Default

If you try the climb cut then I would rout most of the profile the regular way and then drop the bit just a fraction more and do the climb cut. The less material you take off that way the easier it will be to control the router.
harrysin, CharleyL and Semipro like this.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is online now  
post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-26-2018, 01:02 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Herb Stoops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Herb
Posts: 7,758
 
Default

All the above is good advice. If all else fails I would run it down to 1/32 proud and use a sanding block to finish up the one spot that is a problem. I have a set of sanding blocks made from the good parts of old belt sander belts that I use a lot on every project. They sure save the fingers. Soft woods tend to do that, the least little variation in the surface causes it to show up on the cut,and end grain can cut nicely in one direction and not the other,
Herb
dirt_dobber likes this.
Herb Stoops is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking to commission woodworker for round end table Hockeystyx Tools and Woodworking 1 10-26-2009 10:14 AM
finger joint bit for edge to edge atmartin23 Router Bits - Types and Usage 20 09-04-2009 01:51 PM
Laminate counter with oak edge kefjens General Routing 13 03-27-2009 04:37 PM
routing edge on round tom41 Jigs and Fixtures 34 01-06-2009 08:19 PM
Groove in edge of curved piece imrichb Router Bits - Types and Usage 5 07-06-2007 02:03 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome