Bench Grinder for sharpening and general use. - Router Forums
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-19-2011, 09:50 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
the202's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 28
 
Default Bench Grinder for sharpening and general use.

I would like to purchase a bench grinder for sharpening turning tools and general use. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions as to what type, size and grit would be the most effective/efficient. If I had to assign a priority as to how it will be used, I would lean more towards tool sharpening and less towards general purpose. I am also looking at buying an attachable sharpening jig to help set the appropriate grinding angles for lathe tools and chisels. Any thoughts on sharpening jigs would also be appreciated.

My budget for this purchase (including a sharpening jig if needed) is about $200.

So far Ive only looked at a few different models and many include a wire brush or a buffing wheel, do you have these attachments and what do you use them for?

Finally, if there is a better option that is a completely different type of machine that I should consider, what do you recommend? Thanks.
the202 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-19-2011, 09:57 PM
Registered User
 
papawd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Country: United States
First Name: warren
Posts: 2,494
 
Default

I have one little grinder forgot where I purchased it a benchtop, use it 2 times a year for keeping a edge on lawnmower blades and a few times for misc. use. One small smooth and one kinda rough wheel ... for chisels and such I use a hand file

K.I.S.S.- Keep It Super Simple
For I Am Confussion at its Best
Don't fix it if it Ain't broken
Makin sawdust now in South Louisiana
papawd is offline  
post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-20-2011, 09:00 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 3,046
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by the202 View Post
I would like to purchase a bench grinder for sharpening turning tools and general use. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions as to what type, size and grit would be the most effective/efficient. If I had to assign a priority as to how it will be used, I would lean more towards tool sharpening and less towards general purpose. I am also looking at buying an attachable sharpening jig to help set the appropriate grinding angles for lathe tools and chisels. Any thoughts on sharpening jigs would also be appreciated.

My budget for this purchase (including a sharpening jig if needed) is about $200.

So far Ive only looked at a few different models and many include a wire brush or a buffing wheel, do you have these attachments and what do you use them for?

Finally, if there is a better option that is a completely different type of machine that I should consider, what do you recommend? Thanks.
Hi Mike - I have never had much luck sharpening anything more sophisticated than an axe or a shovel on a bench grinder.... inconsistent angles, non-square edges, etc.... I finally invested in the Worksharp 3000 which works great for me. Doing turning tools on it is kind of semi-freehand so don't know how it would work on those. I haven't got into turning so can't comment on that really.

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
jschaben is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-20-2011, 11:01 AM
Registered User
 
dutchman 46's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Howard
Posts: 2,825
 
Default

Hello Mike! John has said what I use the grinder for perfectly They are great for taking off a fair amount of metal. If You were making chisels from flat bar, they will shape the bar. I built a little unit that was shown in Shop Notes about 1 1/2 years ago and it uses fine sand paper to put a keen edge on the chisel, or plane iron. The bench grinder works with jigs to sharpen lathe chisels well, but other than that, it gets no use.

John 3:16

Please fill out your profile, It helps us to know you better
dutchman 46 is offline  
post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-20-2011, 06:47 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 14,763
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by the202 View Post
I would like to purchase a bench grinder for sharpening turning tools and general use. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions as to what type, size and grit would be the most effective/efficient. If I had to assign a priority as to how it will be used, I would lean more towards tool sharpening and less towards general purpose. I am also looking at buying an attachable sharpening jig to help set the appropriate grinding angles for lathe tools and chisels. Any thoughts on sharpening jigs would also be appreciated.

My budget for this purchase (including a sharpening jig if needed) is about $200.

So far Ive only looked at a few different models and many include a wire brush or a buffing wheel, do you have these attachments and what do you use them for?

Finally, if there is a better option that is a completely different type of machine that I should consider, what do you recommend? Thanks.
The wheels that come with a grinder are too coarse and far too hard for fine sharpening. You will burn the edges without ever getting your tools sharp enough. I replaced one wheel with a white, soft bond wheel made by Norton. I have a separate arbor and motor with a hard felt wheel for honing. I bought a Veritas chisel sharpening guide made by Lee Valley. In fact I bought all my sharpening tools from Lee Valley.
Gouges I freehand although Lee Valley has a jig for that. When I'm done on the grinder, I use the felt wheel charged with Lee Valley's green honing compound to put the final edge on. I don't consider my chisels sharp enough unless I can easily shave the hair off the back of my hand or arm. I have found cheaper felt wheels on ebay from a seller called durof1, I beieve he goes by. Even if you don't buy from Lee Valley, you can learn a lot. Leonard Lee, the founder of Lee Valley, wrote a book on sharpening. I was on Robert Sorby's website recently and they called it "the definitive book on sharpening". Hope this helps.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is online now  
post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-20-2011, 11:45 PM
Registered User
 
crquack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Country: Canada
Posts: 367
 
Default

Have a look at the Wolverine jig which I believe is the industry standard. On their web page there are also bench grinder recommendations. FWIW I have two cheap 6" grinders and the Wolverine jig. One cheap grinder, a white wheel, and the jig will probably exceed your $200 limit but they are worth it.
crquack is offline  
post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-21-2011, 08:06 AM
Registered User
 
paduke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Bill
Posts: 1,184
 
Default

There are many lonely grinders out there. I have not yet taken up woodturning but you wood turners use a little toolrest and get good results. Its like everything else we do its a learning curve. I have three wheels on two grinders. Bench grinder with 36 and 80 grit and a slow speed 10" wet grinder. The trick is setting the rest at the angle you want. Take a felt marker and "paint" the chisel. Lightly touch the stone with the chisel. Check how its grinding adjust the tool rest if needed. The key is consistent down pressure on the tool rest with one hand and consistent butt handle prssure with the other. Douse and check for square frequently. A wheel dressing stone helps keep grinding stone flat and chisels tips square. After using the wheels I hone and strop. nice edge.

I also hand sharpen 1/8" bits and larger free hand. But thats another post
paduke is offline  
post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 03-22-2011, 06:47 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
the202's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 28
 
Default

Thanks everyone for all your good information, I've decided to do a little more research before I make a decision. Charles, I followed your advice and received "The Complete Guide to Sharpening" in the mail today. What a fascinating read so far, sharpening is an entire discipline in and of itself.
the202 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wood turning, General woodwork and Instructor iLovo New Member Introductions 2 01-21-2011 05:47 PM
New bench top design Birch Tools and Woodworking 9 04-17-2009 10:57 AM
Bench sized powertools JTsteelblu Tools and Woodworking 3 10-13-2004 01:31 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome