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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-08-2011, 09:07 PM Thread Starter
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Default Thickness planer question

I have never owned a thickness planer, but have been kicking around the idea of getting one recently. It seems every time I try to get a decent piece of pine, it take me longer than the project it's self to pick out the wood. I thought a planer would help with some of this problem. My question is, if you plane a cupped board to where it is flat, how do you account for the now smaller dimension of the board in relation to the rest of the project plans? Must everything be planed to the same thickness? Do you have to redo all the plans? What do all of you do?

Also, any input on a reasonably priced planer $300-$500 range? Any experience with the Grizzly tabletop unit?
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-08-2011, 10:02 PM
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While a planer will help you some, what you really need to start out with is a jointer. You will want to face the board on the jointer so it is truly flat, then run that board thru the planer. You can use a jointer to remove small amounts of twist and warp and wave, where as a planer will many times leave those in while producing a very nicely finished board WITH twist and warp and wave. How do I account for it, well just by judging each piece.

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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-08-2011, 11:56 PM
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If you run a cupped board through a thickness planer, Mike, you usually end up with a thinner cupped board. That's because the feed rollers squash the board flat prior to passing it on to the cutters. Deformities need to be eliminated prior to running the stock through the thickness planer - usually, either using hand planes or a jointer. Often, if starting with 4/4 (near 3/4" actual), there's not much board left., depending on the severity of the deformity.

There are, however, sleds that can support deformed stock to run it through a planer.

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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-09-2011, 12:23 AM Thread Starter
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Very good info. I always thought that a planer was used to flatten out a board and the jointer was more for preparing a square surface for edge jointing. Learned something new.

So, with this in mind, how do we deal with a cupped board? Is ripping, flipping and gluing up the only way to go?
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-09-2011, 02:23 AM
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Buy your wood in larger dimensions, cut, joint, and plane to the sizes you need.
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-09-2011, 09:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDS View Post
Very good info. I always thought that a planer was used to flatten out a board and the jointer was more for preparing a square surface for edge jointing. Learned something new.

So, with this in mind, how do we deal with a cupped board? Is ripping, flipping and gluing up the only way to go?
There's always the fireplace.

I think a lot depends on the severity of the deformation. Note, however, that ripping a cupped board on the TS can be dangerous. Often, it's safer to use the bandsaw, and then clean up the edges on a jointer . . . using an appropriate push block, of course.

It may also be helpful to consider why the board cupped (or did whatever) in the first place. If the deformation is the result of internal stresses in the tree, the ripped pieces may simply continue to deform, as well. On the other hand, if the deformation is the result of improper storage, it's best to solve that problem in addition to trying to salvage some use out of the board.

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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-09-2011, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDS View Post
Very good info. I always thought that a planer was used to flatten out a board and the jointer was more for preparing a square surface for edge jointing. Learned something new.

So, with this in mind, how do we deal with a cupped board? Is ripping, flipping and gluing up the only way to go?
This is why some jointers are so wide, 6", 8", 12", 14" 16", I have even seen, and almost bought, a 24" jointer. Its not so much for just the edge as it is for creating a face thats flat and true. Depending on your budget look into a "Hammer A3-31", or "Mini Max FS35". These are jointer/planers; Jet, Grizzly, and others also have some models available and you should at least look at them to find out what they can do for you,
Search for Woodworking Supplies at Woodcraft.com
G0633 12" Jointer / Planer
Jointers/Planer Combos
HAMMER Jointer-Planer A3-31

Jack


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