Yet another problem...! - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-13-2012, 03:24 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Country: Malta
First Name: Joseph
Posts: 48
 
Default Yet another problem...!

I allways get here with some problem or another at times. Now this regards my 10" planer and thicknesser. The problem occurs when planing a plank's face on the planer top. Lets say that the plank is 24" long right? Now the planer shaves of the first 4-5 inches of tyhe plank and the last 4-5 inches or something near to that. When the piece of wood is viewed sideways it can be clearly seen that the planing is not as it should be. Now I am aware that there is a problem in setting or some sort however I cannot see it!!! Any suggestions pleeeaaassse???
Mosti is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-13-2012, 04:59 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dennis
Posts: 430
 
Default

It sounds like your board is not straight (cupped) so the knives are only hitting the high points. A jointer is used to plane on side flat before going to the thickness planer. You could plane the board flat on one side with a hand plane. Then run it through the planer.
denniswoody is offline  
post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-13-2012, 05:07 PM
Registered User
 
CharleyL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Charley
Posts: 2,013
 
Default

It would help if we knew what planer you have, if you have infeed and outfeed tables, if this is a new planer first time use, Is the board flat to begin with, etc. Whenever I use a new-to-me planer I always start with a scrap 3-4' piece of 2 X 4 stock that is straight and with no significant knots. After the first pass I can see what the planer has done to it and what changes may need to be made.

Please tell us more.

Charley
CharleyL is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-14-2012, 04:08 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Country: Malta
First Name: Joseph
Posts: 48
 
Default

This is a planer like I have
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	114575.jpg
Views:	69
Size:	22.7 KB
ID:	50141  

Mosti is offline  
post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-14-2012, 06:42 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: PAUL
Posts: 11
 
Smile planer thicknesser

Hi Mosti,
Just thought i would say something BUT THATS NOT THE WAY TO DO IT!
When i use my planer thicknesser I only take off 1-2mm at a time at most 3mm
this allows the blades to optimize the right speed leaving a smooth finish
I use a sheppach 2600 PLANER THICKNESSER
again 3-5 inches is tooooo- much in one pass
Thankyou for reading
Hope i haven"T offended you
ALL THE VERY BEST! Tritoneer:
TRITONEER is offline  
post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-14-2012, 08:43 AM
Registered User
 
CharleyL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Charley
Posts: 2,013
 
Default

The tool that you have appears to be what we call a jointer or joiner. It is intended to get one side or edge perfectly flat and square to it's adjacent side. It is NOT a planer/thicknesser.

Was the surface that you ran through your jointer straight and relatively flat before you cut it? If it wasn't and was cupped I would expect it to only get cut at the ends. The jointer removes the parts of the board surface that touch the table to make that surface of the board straighter. It may take several passes before the jointer cuts an even amount of wood off of the full surface, but once it has that surface will be perfectly straight and smooth. Now rotate the stock 90 degrees and place this freshly cut edge against the fence. Now, with each pass you will be straightening and flattening the second side of your stock, but also making the first and second sides perfectly square with each other (if the fence is set correctly).

A second tool, called a thickness planer, is then used to make the two remaining sides of your stock parallel with these first two sides and it can also be used to reduce the thickness of the material to whatever is required by making many passes with reduced cutter settings each time. Although it is possible to straighten and smooth all four sides of your stock with your jointer, it isn't possible to get the opposite sides perfectly parallel with each other using only a jointer, unless the jointer is one of the few jointer/planer combination tools that are on the market. I can't tell for certainty what it is from the photo as I have not seen one of this model before.

I hope my explanation has helped.

Charley

Last edited by CharleyL; 02-14-2012 at 08:46 AM.
CharleyL is offline  
post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-14-2012, 05:57 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Ray
Posts: 42
 
Default

Your outfeed table may not be parallel with the infeed. The rear of the outfeed may be elevated. Sketch this out and you may see what I mean. Also, take a straight edge and check for parallel.
Ray Y is offline  
post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2012, 04:33 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Country: Malta
First Name: Joseph
Posts: 48
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TRITONEER View Post
Hi Mosti,
Just thought i would say something BUT THATS NOT THE WAY TO DO IT!
When i use my planer thicknesser I only take off 1-2mm at a time at most 3mm
this allows the blades to optimize the right speed leaving a smooth finish
I use a sheppach 2600 PLANER THICKNESSER
again 3-5 inches is tooooo- much in one pass
Thankyou for reading
Hope i haven"T offended you
ALL THE VERY BEST! Tritoneer:
No no..I shave off 1mm at a time as you do! With 3-5 inches I meant from the length of the plank, got it?!
Mosti is offline  
post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2012, 04:38 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Country: Malta
First Name: Joseph
Posts: 48
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
The tool that you have appears to be what we call a jointer or joiner. It is intended to get one side or edge perfectly flat and square to it's adjacent side. It is NOT a planer/thicknesser.

Was the surface that you ran through your jointer straight and relatively flat before you cut it? If it wasn't and was cupped I would expect it to only get cut at the ends. The jointer removes the parts of the board surface that touch the table to make that surface of the board straighter. It may take several passes before the jointer cuts an even amount of wood off of the full surface, but once it has that surface will be perfectly straight and smooth. Now rotate the stock 90 degrees and place this freshly cut edge against the fence. Now, with each pass you will be straightening and flattening the second side of your stock, but also making the first and second sides perfectly square with each other (if the fence is set correctly).

A second tool, called a thickness planer, is then used to make the two remaining sides of your stock parallel with these first two sides and it can also be used to reduce the thickness of the material to whatever is required by making many passes with reduced cutter settings each time. Although it is possible to straighten and smooth all four sides of your stock with your jointer, it isn't possible to get the opposite sides perfectly parallel with each other using only a jointer, unless the jointer is one of the few jointer/planer combination tools that are on the market. I can't tell for certainty what it is from the photo as I have not seen one of this model before.

I hope my explanation has helped.

Charley
This is also a thicknesser since after planing a face and a side of the board I pass the material from underneath to get it the thickness I want, maybe this is not clear from the photo I found online.

Cheers
Mosti is offline  
post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 02-15-2012, 04:39 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Country: Malta
First Name: Joseph
Posts: 48
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Y View Post
Your outfeed table may not be parallel with the infeed. The rear of the outfeed may be elevated. Sketch this out and you may see what I mean. Also, take a straight edge and check for parallel.
I'll check this out as it makes sense as to how the finishing is coming out.

Thanks
Mosti is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Makita 3612C collet problem W C Slad General Routing 10 01-16-2012 10:53 AM
PC plunge router depth gauge problem codgerbill Portable Routing 5 03-25-2010 09:50 AM
Problem with Sabre 408 JOdam New Member Introductions 2 02-17-2010 03:07 AM
Another new guy, another problem! Billyt New Member Introductions 8 03-22-2009 01:14 AM
Hitachi M12V Router Problem dcarriere Tools and Woodworking 3 12-28-2004 07:50 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome