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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-20-2012, 08:49 PM Thread Starter
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Default Pull saws

Looking for a good pull saw and am asking how easy it is to cut hardwood with one.

I purposely made some extremely proud dovetails and had planned to use a pull saw to trim the tails before fine sanding. Locally a pull saw was unavailable so got this Lowes.com Error 500 - We are having a problem with our server and the Kobalt Back saw didn't do what I wanted so am looking at this Vaughan-Bushnell BS240P Pull Stroke Handsaw: Amazon.com: Home Improvement a Vaughan-Bushnell BS240P Pull Stroke Handsaw.

...... So am I on the right track?

Galatians 5:13
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-20-2012, 10:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Marco View Post
Looking for a good pull saw and am asking how easy it is to cut hardwood with one.

I purposely made some extremely proud dovetails and had planned to use a pull saw to trim the tails before fine sanding. Locally a pull saw was unavailable so got this Lowes.com Error 500 - We are having a problem with our server and the Kobalt Back saw didn't do what I wanted so am looking at this Vaughan-Bushnell BS240P Pull Stroke Handsaw: Amazon.com: Home Improvement a Vaughan-Bushnell BS240P Pull Stroke Handsaw.

...... So am I on the right track?
Hi Jim - I've got this thing from Home Depot
4-3/4 in. Flush Cut Pull Saw-20-331 at The Home Depot saw&storeId=10051
I was really surprised with how well it does. I don't do hand dovetails but this thing got right with it with some oak dowels I needed trimmed.

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-21-2012, 12:08 AM
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Shark Corp Pull Stroke Handsaw | eBay

http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Shark-Corp-Pull-Stroke-Handsaw-/00/s/NjAwWDYwMA==/$(KGrHqR,!g4E8rVqQ7,lBP(jfWMDig~~60_3.GIF

Shark brand works well also

It'll cut right through anything. One side is for ripping, the other is for crosscutting. Sometimes both sides are for crosscutting.

You'll dig it.
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-21-2012, 08:45 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys. Yes I'm just wanting to make flush cuts to trim off any excess. It's hard to believe what the stores around here do not carry.

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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-22-2012, 10:00 AM
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Jim,

Using a hand saw to flush cut off the protrusions from your dovetail joint can be difficult because any set in the saw teeth will cause scratches in the side of your work. If you want to use a hand saw for this you will need to find a "flush cut" saw which has no set in the teeth. See the attached link for an example of one of these saws (although they are available from other sources).
Flush Cutting Trim Saw - Rockler Woodworking Tools

When I want to trim a dovetail or box joint flush with the box I usually mount a flush cutting bit in my router table and then set the bit high enough so that the end bearing of the bit rides against the side of my box. I then carefully rout the protrusions flush with the side of the box. If you do it this way, be sure to use a backer board to keep the end of the cut from chipping out.

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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-22-2012, 04:17 PM
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Hey Jim...

you can't be a good flush cut saw!!! Prices will vary greatly, more often than not due to the steel used and/or the mfg. I've found that the big box saws and even those from places like woodcraft/rockler serve the purpose quite well and not for alot of money. I do have a Bridge City Tool Works saw that I save for those 'special' projects and it just cuts like butter!!!

When you get yours, tinker around a little bit. There is a bit of technique involved and can make a world of difference, in both ease of cut and quality of cut. As with most saws, remember to let the saw do the work and you'll be most pleased with the results..

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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-22-2012, 08:19 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the input Charles and Bill. I will likely use the flush trim bit on the table this weekend as a flush cut saw will have to be ordered either from the store or online. The reason I haven't used the flush trim bit was that I was wanting to trim the tails during a dry fit then seperate the pieces to apply a torch to all sides giving a nice burn efffect to the grain. I didn't feel lucky trimming the tails unglued so will burn the insides, glue it, trim the tails on the table and then torch the outside to match the effect of the inside. BTW it's just a little footstool that you can see the different sides of and it would be difficult to get the torch to the inside(s) and get a consistant effect. I have heard the burn effect looks great with a poly finish on it so wanted to try it out on something small plus it's for my Ma-In-Law and if it doesn't work out...... oh well!

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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-23-2012, 06:10 PM
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I use a Kugihiki for flush cutting (Japanese flush cut pull saw) and a Dozuki for dovetails and tenons.

The Kugihiki is a thin flexible blade. You can have the handle up so you're not scraping your knuckles while the blade flexes down flat. I've also used it as a jamb saw using a piece of whatever kind of floor I'm putting down as a spacer to give me exactly the right height.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-24-2012, 10:30 AM
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Jim, every one of the flush trim saws I have tried worked fine. Here is one that should be easy to find: Mini-Detail 7-1/4 in. Pull Saw-MPS10189 at The Home Depot flush trim saw&storeId=10051

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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 03-24-2012, 11:06 AM
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I use Japanese style thin blade saws every day. I couldn't even tell you the name on them (Kawasaki, Yamaha) but they work great. No tooth set means no scratches. Since they cut on the tension stroke (pull) rather than the compression stroke (push) you are able to perfectly create a very narrow kerf. Use them slowly - taking your time and they should last you years of regular use.
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