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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-29-2006, 11:35 PM Thread Starter
 
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Default FREUD Dado Sets

Hello all
I just bought the FREUD Dado Set model SD208 with 12 teeth per blade & 2 teeth per chipper.
Now looking at a review from WOOD Magazine (September 2003) witch indicates the results are a little less then perfect in Melamine coated particleboard, & Oak plywood crosscutting without a zero clearance insert.

I am thinking of going for the new FREUD SD600 Series Dial-A-Width Dado Set (model SD608)

Has anyone used either of the FREUD Dado Sets?

Dan
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-30-2006, 11:08 AM
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Keep in mind that they were comparing the SD208 to the higher dollar premium dado sets like the SD508 and SD608 which have twice as many teeth. The SD208 does a really nice job in all of those materials (particularly with a little slower feed rate) and is an excellent value. If you dado a lot of tricky materials and/or need faster feed rates you would benefit from the more expensive sets. The SD608 is the top of the heap but also requires the longest arbor. To calculate the arbor requirements for this one use this formula:
Total SD6## dado width is equal to either the Arbor length MINUS nut thickness MINUS 7/32" or the max dado width specified by the saw manufacturer, whichever is less.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-30-2006, 12:05 PM
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Dan, another thing to consider is all blades/dado sets will perform better with a zero clearance insert. You can buy inserts for most tables or make your own. A dado set will require a different insert for each width of cut you make, so building your own is the smart way to go. In all situations a zero clearance insert provides better support to prevent tear out and assists the dust collection.

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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-30-2006, 01:51 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks Charles & Mike for you input on this.
Will do some thinking on it.

As long as the 208 will do a good job on veneers & Melamine I have no problem going slow.
I just don't want to find out that I canít prevent chipping with this dado set after it is too late to exchange it.

Thanks
Dan
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 10-30-2006, 03:57 PM
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Just my 2 cents

With all the smart people in this world you would think someone would come up with a great Dado saw set that doesn't cost as much as the saw you are going to use it on.

The dado saw set is one of the main reasons I started to use the router for that job, the dado sets are just a real big pain to use unlike the router.
I'm sure we have all seen Norm of the NYWS use the dado set but I never see him play with or set it up for a cut,it can take a long time to get it right ,playing the dial type or shim type.

The only time I now use one is for hogging out a lap joint because it will do that job quick and easy.

Bj



Freud SD208/SD508/SD608

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Last edited by bobj3; 10-30-2006 at 06:18 PM.
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 04-29-2010, 10:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles M View Post
Keep in mind that they were comparing the SD208 to the higher dollar premium dado sets like the SD508 and SD608 which have twice as many teeth. The SD208 does a really nice job in all of those materials (particularly with a little slower feed rate) and is an excellent value. If you dado a lot of tricky materials and/or need faster feed rates you would benefit from the more expensive sets. The SD608 is the top of the heap but also requires the longest arbor. To calculate the arbor requirements for this one use this formula:
Total SD6## dado width is equal to either the Arbor length MINUS nut thickness MINUS 7/32" or the max dado width specified by the saw manufacturer, whichever is less.
Hello-I have the Jet Proshop Table-will the dial-a-width dado blade work on that arbor? Thanks, Jeff Portland, Or
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 04-30-2010, 11:28 AM
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Bobj3,
I'm convinced you just don't like TS Dado sets.
I use my old dado set with and without shims and frankly it doesn't take long at all to set up, there's nothing confusing about it.

For long and repeated rabbit and dados the TS is superior. If I'm doing shelf dados then without question the hand held router is superior when a good dado jig is used with it

In general I prefer the cut results of the TS to the router.

TEHO

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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 04-30-2010, 11:44 AM
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Hi Ron

Your are right ,, using a dado set is like using a chain saw for dado's they will both hog out the stock quick and look about the same ..it's true you can buy the high ends sets but why when a router bit for much less and you always have a clean slot..

Just as a side note ,once you mount your router to a RAS you will never know how easy and how clean your dados/rabbit's can come out, not to say any thing about stop dado's ,try that with a dado set for the table saw

=====

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghidrah View Post
Bobj3,
I'm convinced you just don't like TS Dado sets.
I use my old dado set with and without shims and frankly it doesn't take long at all to set up, there's nothing confusing about it.

For long and repeated rabbit and dados the TS is superior. If I'm doing shelf dados then without question the hand held router is superior when a good dado jig is used with it

In general I prefer the cut results of the TS to the router.

TEHO


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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 04-30-2010, 03:19 PM
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I have used both methods. For quick and speedy dado cuts, I use the TS. These are usually dado cuts that aren't needing to be too precise. However, when I'm in need of such precision dado's, I'm with Bj on this one. A router does an excellent job.

I am NOT saying one is better than the other, only pointing out that in my experience using both methods, they each have their uses for me. Only YOU can decide which is best for you.

Ken

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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-01-2010, 08:53 AM
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When I 1st bought my RAS 25 something yrs ago, I discovered the Craftsman RAS arbor accepted an adapter to allow for router bits and bought it. I experimented with it a couple times and never felt comfortable.

Except for dados in framing lumber, (pergolas and arbors) I rarely use the RAS anymore for anything but a catch all table for extra tools and project parts.

One thing I can't agree with is not getting accurate cuts with TS dado set. I haven't had a bad TS dado since I learned how to use it and shims.

Back in 89 to 90 I did some framing for a guy that was slowly backing away from framing and getting into the finish aspect of construction. Jim was damn good at high end one of a kind cabinetry. One time I was in his shop I saw him pull out a board with tonza crosscuts in it.

For those that haven't thought of it yet and its probably because you don't use TS dado set often to see the practicality. Spend an hour or 2 on a Sunday afternoon pull out your dado set and shims if you have them. Before I had a real shim set I used writing paper and the cardboard backer for note pads for shims.

Start with the 2 outside cutters set them in, take a couple 1X4s and make a test cut near the end of one. Continue to correctly add 1 cutter at a time and making new cuts till all cutters are in. Beside each cut write down what was used to produce the cut. for most people this will be enough for pretty much all lumber you don't personally mill yourself.

For those that use 1/4" plywood in dados I'd go with a 7/32 or 15/64 straight router bit. For 3/8 to 3/4 I'd set the TS dado set up with shims to provide those cuts.

For those that do much planing for furniture, boxes and such go the next step and begin again with the shims.

Initially its a "pain-in-the-butt" but worth it in the long.

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