Do I need A Jointer As Well - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 05:25 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Gaia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Peter
Posts: 607
 
Default Do I need A Jointer As Well

I'm a little confused perhaps folks can put me right. I recently got a new Dewalt 733 thicknesser planer at a very good price 388 inc vat tax inc delivery. My main interest in woodworking is making doors, replacing my rotting windows and if not to ambitious, replacing my staircase. As I get more into wood working I might develop other interests as well.

I've been reading about a tool called a jointer ( surface Planer ? ) the bench top ones seem to be OK for timber up to 48 inches long. Anything longer better to have a longer bed.

If I use a 16-18 inch bandsaw with a depth of cut of 300mm. I can get rough cut timber and use a resaw blade on the bandsaw to cut down to rough size. Then use the Dewalt to thickness it. I understand I can save a lot of money doing things this way , I expect to be using quite a lot of wood in my business venture.

I've been reading up on the net about bandsaws . I'm ordering two books on bandsaws to find out more, The Bandsaw Book by Lonnie Bird and The New Complete Guide To The Bandsaw, Everything You Need To Know About The Most Important Saw In The Shop. by Mark Duginske.

What I'd like to know please, am I going to be needing a jointer as well?

As I said I expect I will be using quite a lot of wood in my business venture.
As I'm intending to make custom doors, frames and architrave as well as skirting. I'm also learning to carve I have a wetstone grinder. I recently bought for the grinder a knife sharpening jig to sharpen the Dewalt knives on.

I have been looking but as yet, have not really been able to find anything. Is their a jointer I should think about buying I assume with as long a bed as possible? That is good quality, reasonably priced and available in the UK that would do the job?
Thanks all,
Pete.
Gaia is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 05:54 AM
Registered User
 
wbh1963's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Bill
Posts: 766
 
Default

A jointer is an electric planer designed to surface the edges of a board. It does it's job in a very similar way that a thickness planer surfaces the top and/or bottom of a board.

A common reason for surfacing the top and bottom is usually associated with achieving parallel surfaces with a desired thickness of board between them.

A common reason for surfacing the edges of a board are to insure that they are square with the top and bottom. I have heard it is called a jointer because this step is a critical in the preparation of 'component' boards before 'jointing' them up into a panel. Whether this is correct or not, surfacing edges has been called 'jointing' since at least the mid 1800s when it was used to describe hand planes with longer beds (over 20").

Jointing is among the many tasks that I feel table routers can do exceptionally well. It is very unlikely another summer will pass before I get my first thickness planer, yet I'm not entirely certain I will ever be willing to dedicate the floor space required to a jointer, on the premise a router can do this for me.

Dedicated jointer machines are common up to thicknesses of 6", nearly twice the size of longer straight bits for routers. Their bed performance is generally superior to the average router's fence. I intend to craft up a custom fence specifically tailored to accommodate jointing if/when required. Currently, my need to joint boards is low enough that my hand planes can get the job done fast enough. (working mostly with softwoods has some bearing on that).

I have also seen table saw blades marketed as being 'planer' blades. While I haven't tried any of them, I have had great results using both 60 and 100 tooth 10" blades to smooth and square edges of a board. I'm also told that taking a cut that is less than the width of the blade can lead to premature warping of the blade.

Whether or not you should get a dedicated jointer is a complex decision. From the description of what you want to do, you will need to do a lot of edge surfacing, so it could be the right answer, especially if floor space and budget permit.

wbh1963 is flowing with the grain in Arlington, Washington, USA

A day without curls is like a day without sunshine!
wbh1963 is offline  
post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 07:01 AM
RouterForums.com User
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,812
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

Usually the question is "which should I get first, a jointer or a thickness planer" If you have a board with a curve, passing it through the thickness planer will produce a thinner curved board. The jointer however would be used to remove the curve on one side before passing it through the planer with the now flat side down, but if the choice is one or the other, my advice would always be to have a jointer first, like I did and managed with it for many years, then when funds permit add the planer.

Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 07:36 AM
Retired Moderator
 
Bob N's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Bob
Posts: 5,688
     
Default

I will have to take the opposite view from Harry and go with the planner first. Here is why.

A Planer Sled for Milling Lumber - Fine Woodworking Video
Bob N is offline  
post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 08:36 AM
Registered User
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Gene
Posts: 11,590
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob N View Post
I will have to take the opposite view from Harry and go with the planner first. Here is why.

A Planer Sled for Milling Lumber - Fine Woodworking Video
Exactly!
With that sled, a 4" or 6" jointer is adequate for most shops. With one caveat, though. Bed length is shorter. I get by with a roller stand at the out feed of my 6" Jointer.

Gene Howe
Snowflake, AZ

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

Please edit your profile with a name and location so we can better assist you and make for a friendlier forum.
Gene Howe is offline  
post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 09:09 AM
Registered User
 
OPG3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Otis
Posts: 1,988
 
Default

Quote:
As I said I expect I will be using quite a lot of wood in my business venture.
As I'm intending to make custom doors, frames and architrave as well as skirting.
Peter, One thing you may need to think about is "portability", if any of your work is done out of your shop and on a jobsite. One of my guys carries in his truck (his own personal hand-held power planer). He loves it and has used it for a variety of work. With the old-fashioned (elbow grease) handplanes in excellent condition, in the right hands the jointer work can be done with less mess. Power tools such as jointers and planers can be out of alignment in some cases if they are relocated to jobsites. Either machine produces a lot of noise and dust! Very little of my work involves these machining operations, but when the necessity pops-up, I have work-arounds that use routers for either operations - if the volume of work is small. Eventually, you may need both machines. Harry has a lot of experience and his suggestions are based on a lot of work, I suggest listen to him a lot!

OPG3

Tweak everything!
OPG3 is offline  
post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 09:10 AM
RouterForums.com User
 
harrysin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Country: Australia
First Name: Harry
Posts: 14,812
     
Send a message via Skype™ to harrysin
Default

That is a method that I've never considered Bob. Have you or in fact any other member given the method a test. By the way, it's good to see you posting again Bob, I do hope that your health has improved.

Harry



Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend. - Plautus






harrysin is offline  
post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 09:48 AM
Registered User
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Country: United States
First Name: Gene
Posts: 11,590
 
Default

Hi Harry,
Immediately after reading the FWW article, I built the sled. Been using it ever since.
Works a treat.
If the deviation from flat isn't too severe, and the stock is shorter (under 4') I use a simple sled comprised of a 4' long, 3/4" piece of ply covered with 60 grit paper and small wedges under the work. Also works well.
I do a lot of face to face glue ups and I'm a real stickler for dead flat faces. Using the planer sled(s) followed by few passes on my "Flat Sander" satisfies my obsessive need for flatness.
For edge glue ups, the planer sled(s) alone suffice, with the flat sander after the glue up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by harrysin View Post
That is a method that I've never considered Bob. Have you or in fact any other member given the method a test. By the way, it's good to see you posting again Bob, I do hope that your health has improved.

Gene Howe
Snowflake, AZ

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

Please edit your profile with a name and location so we can better assist you and make for a friendlier forum.
Gene Howe is offline  
post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 11:28 AM
Retired Moderator
 
Bob N's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Bob
Posts: 5,688
     
Default

Hi Harry,

Yes, I have used jigs similar to his idea, but no where near as elaborate. Mount your piece to a known flat surface with double sided tape and run it thru the planner, flat piece down and then you have one flat surface to then flatten the other side. I think Gene provided a more detailed description above. I don't even own a power planner, but I do have a mean Veritas #7 hand plane

Harry, my health has substantially improved and I am even riding a bicycle up to 7 miles per day and have lost 32 lbs already. Hope to get it up to 10 or 15 miles by the end of summer. Dr. says I am becoming an example of great health these days. Thanks so much for asking and I hope you too are doing well.

Last edited by Bob N; 05-23-2012 at 04:18 PM.
Bob N is offline  
post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 05-23-2012, 04:17 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Gaia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Peter
Posts: 607
 
Default

[QUOTE=wbh1963;285505]A jointer is an electric planer designed to surface the edges of a board. It does it's job in a very similar way that a thickness planer surfaces the top and/or bottom of a board.


OK thanks, I think as and when the time comes I will try squaring the edge with the router and table. I did a quick search on planer saw blades but couldn't find anything. 100 tooth table saw blades are available at a reasonble cost, will look into that option. If either of these approaches don't produce the desired result. Will have to think about getting a jointer.
Gaia is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
J.D. Wallace 8" jointer AxlMyk Tools and Woodworking 15 10-26-2015 10:29 AM
Jet JJ-12 Jointer Information? ORBlackFZ1 Tools and Woodworking 6 03-22-2014 01:10 AM
Your input on a 6" Jointer buy Marco Tools and Woodworking 26 12-21-2011 10:55 AM
Rikon 20-100 Jointer or Grizzly parallelogram jointer procrastinator1 Tools and Woodworking 6 08-27-2010 04:20 AM
Jointer? Or Planer? Which one first? reikimaster Tools and Woodworking 26 09-27-2007 01:38 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome