New to air compressors - inline oilers etc? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 09:08 AM Thread Starter
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Default New to air compressors - inline oilers etc?

After saying for a long time I'd never own an air compressor, here I am looking to buy a small air compressor to run a framing and brad nailer (not at the same time) to help speed up some nailing jobs on the cabin build later this summer.

Are the inline regulators, oilers and air filters that useful, or can I skip them as something that would be nice to have down the road? I understand if I don't use them, I need to add a few drops of oil to the hose/tool every time I use it.

I picked this framing nailer up on sale. It's a monster, I had no idea it would be so big.


Wow, framing nailers are big! by bobbotron1, on Flickr

Edit: ack, I meant to post this under tools, not table mounted routing! Mods, could you move this over?

Last edited by bobbotron; 06-06-2012 at 09:13 AM.
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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 09:20 AM
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I'd go for the air filter. Compressor tend to accumulate a lot of moisture.

The regulator on the compressor should be sufficient.

I would rather do the few drops of oil directly into the tool than fool with an inline oiler. If you put the oiler at the compressor, the oil in the hose will make the hose unusable if you should ever decide to use a paint spray gun!
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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 10:09 AM
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Rob, a moisture filter will prolong your air tools life by a significant amount; it also keeps water out of any finish you spray. You do not need an oiler since many of the newer tools are oilless. For those that do require oil a couple drops of Marvel Air Tool Oil into the tool before use will do the trick. Do not use teflon tape on your fittings since this is the biggest cause of failures on air tools and valves. A small amount of the tape can break off and will cause big problems. Use teflon pipe dope instead.

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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 10:31 AM
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Everything the other guys said, Rob! Especially about the oiler. It might make sense in a mfg. facility, but for the small contractor, or home shop, a waste of money. You should be doing a visual check of your air tools before you use them anyway. I never leave my tools connected if I'm not using them; I figure that a constant 100+psi on the seals can't be doing them any good, eh?
Same for the compressor itself; I always release the pressure when I'm finished using it...and don't forget to drain the moisture out!!!
-hearing and eye protection absolutely essential, but you do that anyway, right(?)

You're gonna love using that spiker, Rob.
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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 10:39 AM
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My carpenter buddy and I are doing some framing at my place as we speak. He brought over his portable 'pancake' style compressor yesterday and I was really impressed at how it was able to keep up with the air demand from either the coil nailer or the spiker. Sure, it cycles more frequently than my 20 gal. tank type but other than the noise, no practical difference performance wise.
The 'pancake' type be useless for something that needed a constant air supply, like an orbital sander for example. (It is however really portable!)
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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 11:56 AM
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I have an oiler for my line but I usually just add a few drops into the inlet like most others have said. Mike is right that many are oiless and I don't think it does them any good to add oil so you should make sure which kind you have. If you didn't get the operating manuals you can probably find them on the net.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 01:03 PM
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Hi

I use a inline oiler all the ,you don't need to get the oil in the air line just the tool.
Best to be safe than sorry


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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 01:52 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the feedback guys!

The nailer I bought is an oiled nailer. I think I'll try going with the "few drops of oil every time" approach and see how that works. I'll definitely look into getting an inline air filter.

Interesting to know about Teflon tape! I have some experience with oxy acetylene, where Teflon tape is a huge nono... Never heard of pipe dope before, thanks, that stuff looks great.

Danny, I'm looking to get one of those pancakes, or a small twin stack compressor. Nothing fancy, just something to power the nail gun somewhat reliably. I'll definitely be wearing eye and ear protection! (And steel toe boots when I get to nailing.)
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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 03:00 PM
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Rob, if you're doing a lot of nailing, pop the air hose off every couple of hours and add a few more drops of oil. My nailer is one of the tools I did add an oiler onto. Most of the rest of mine just get used for a few minutes and then get put away but the nailer sits there all day long when you're building and can go through a lot of nails.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2012, 03:09 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Chuck, that was mentioned in the instructions for my nail gun too. Definitely good to know, I'll keep that in mind.
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