Gluing loose abrasive - Router Forums
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-03-2013, 02:03 PM Thread Starter
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Default Gluing loose abrasive

I have lots of loose abrasive from when I was sandblasting etching glass.
Some Carborundum, Aluminum Oxide and Garnet.

I am thinking of gluing some to some wooden doweling so I can sand various small parts like the band sawn reindeers (picture attached). The doweling would be chucked in a drill.

What glue should I use?
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-03-2013, 02:39 PM
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When I built a sailboat I used sand sprinkled onto a layer of epoxy as non-skid for the deck. It worked exceptionally well and I think you could do the same to make your sanding dowels.

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Ralph,
Many years ago, I remember my father using hide glue.
Mike
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-03-2013, 06:42 PM Thread Starter
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Ralph,
Many years ago, I remember my father using hide glue.
Mike
I even have some!

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-04-2013, 06:41 AM
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Years ago as an experiment in finishes I glued sparkles, or whatever that stuff is called. Glitter I think. Anyway, it went on quite well, and if it had been an abrasive I don't see why it wouldn't have worked. I used Titebond II - which I use for almost all my woodworking needs, works great. Of course probably any other woodworking glue would probably work as well, but I just like the Titebond II. Stuff like that, I never ask, just think about it, and if seems workable go ahead and try it - and it usually works.

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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-04-2013, 08:18 AM
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While hyde glue may seem like a good idea, remember that the sanding process produces friction and heat. Hyde glue softens with heat, so your sanding device will self destruct as soon as it heats up. Go with a more heat resistant type of glue, like epoxy. Titebond may work OK if you are careful not to create too much friction while sanding. Most sanding products will fail if they get hot enough.

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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-04-2013, 08:57 AM
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Personally, I would try a 3 lb cut shellac for the super fine grit and polyurethane for a little larger grit. Since you are hand sanding heat is not an issue and if you stick it in the drill press what's the worst that could happen? Epoxy would be good for 60 and 80 grit. Just dip the end and roll in the grit.

Good Luck
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-04-2013, 09:52 AM Thread Starter
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Great input. I hadn't thought of shellac.
I have all the glues mentioned so far.

I think I'll get the best result using Epoxy.
The grits I have are 80, 150 and I think 100. Not sure about the 100 as it was unmarked when I got it.
The unmarked is black and I think carborundum.
I can't remember how I happened upon it. All the rest I bought in bulk back in 1987 or so.

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Last edited by rwl7532; 01-05-2013 at 04:35 PM. Reason: Grit #s corrected
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-04-2013, 12:57 PM
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Ralph, this is interesting! Please keep us posted on this when you have compiled some data, I feel confident many others beyond me will be very interested in your results. I have someone who does my sand / glass bead blasting and he will be glad to bring me any abrasives I have need for. There is quite a variety of glues that we use and also we use a huge quantity of wooden dowels - which would mean 2 out of 3 ingredients are here when needed (with the abrasive easily here).
On a slightly different subject, if you ever have need to do "grain-raising" - sand blasting can sometimes do the job very nicely and make a new piece of wood look decades old.
Take care my friend, Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia.

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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 01-04-2013, 04:37 PM Thread Starter
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On a slightly different subject, if you ever have need to do "grain-raising" - sand blasting can sometimes do the job very nicely and make a new piece of wood look decades old.
Take care my friend, Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia.
I intend to set up sandblasting (for glass) in my garage. I miss it. Haven't done any since 1990!! I don't do high pressure blasting (requiring a dedicated blast booth). I've found that low pressure blasting can be contained with merely a shop vac supplying the negative pressure. Well most of the grit anyway.

I would be able to do "grain-raising" as that doesn't take much pressure or time -- compared to a sandblasted wood sign of course.

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