Accuracy- What do you use for truing, square and setup of tools and jigs? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-05-2013, 01:34 PM Thread Starter
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Default Accuracy- What do you use for truing, square and setup of tools and jigs?

I know some of this has been dancing about before. Some say, "It's close enough for the women I go out with...."

In residential carpentry (homes), 1/4" tolerance is allowed. In finish, cabinets and furniture carpentry, 1/32" or 1/16- as it is referred. That is in "work." What you create. You create it with tools.

I started this thread for us to share what we use to align, true, square, setup those tools and jigs. How can work be close if the tools you are creating it with be off?

Tools- set machined blocks.
- I have brass bars in 1/8", 1/4", 5/16", 3/8" and 1/2". These I can use to set distance from cutter to fence -or- common tool heights.
- I have steel machined blocks 3/4" and 1" with a right angle and 2 45 degree angles. I use these for tool setup and checking square of blades and fences.
- I have 36" pieces, each of 5/8" x 5/8" and 3/4" x 3/4" square stock to put into miter slots, to align and square fences.

I have squares, levels and straight edges. I have dial indicators, calipers, micrometers.

Some may say that such accuracy is not needed for woodworking... To a point. I feel that the closer you can get with your tooling, the more sluff room you have in your work. Example- If your tooling is out 1/8" in x distance, how do you ever expect to be within 1/16"?

For most people doing small projects, a miter in 5 degree stops is acceptable to them. They wouldn't notice how being off a small amount means a whole lot more at 8 feet out. Now then at 0.1 degree increments, I agree, that is a pain and somewhat frustrating. Yes, it is all a matter of perspective, but if you take the time to bring it in close, it makes it all easier in the long run.

What do you use to set or square your tools? For instance, a miter gauge?

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 01-05-2013 at 02:01 PM.
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-05-2013, 01:43 PM
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Default Tools I use

Quote:
Originally Posted by MAFoElffen View Post
Someone made a comment in an old thread...

<<Placeholder while I clean that up>>
Well, the table saw almost has to have a dial gauge. I use the one offered by Woodpecker but any similar design will do.

http://www.woodpeck.com/sawgauge.html

But, for almost everything else, I use a digital angle gauge almost exclusively. They are small, accurate, and can be set up so measurements are relative to one another. Great for table saw angles in relation to the table top, mortis and tenon vise setup, drill press, planers, shapers, band saws, router tables, sanding tables, grinders, and my oldest tool, the radial arm saw.


Just remember what my father always said, " Half the people in this world are below average!", and everything in life will make a hellova lot more sense.

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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-05-2013, 02:43 PM
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Default Accuracy As a Skill

Only slightly off topic. Have I previously mentioned a local trail builder's skill with a chainsaw? This boardwalk has something like 150+ handrail frames, set into the log bases (180' of logs flattened out with a chainsaw...freehand).
The channels are all notched out with his chainsaw. You'd be hard pressed to fit a piece of bond paper into those cuts.
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-05-2013, 03:40 PM
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I use a home built alignment jig, a wixey guage, straight edges, precision machinist square, and the like for machine setup. After everything is good and aligned I get by with the wixey gage, brass bars and scales.

http://www.routerforums.com/tools-wo...html#post60770

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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-05-2013, 04:17 PM
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I don't fiddle-around with things like that, but rather every once-in-a-while I just make some cuts and do a flip-check. Again, I have 2- Hitachi C10FL table saws and they have both always been dead-on 90 degrees for over 5 years. Making things be beautiful like fine furniture is not my thing, but my work is dimensionally dead-on accurate always before it goes to my clients - after all, just about everything I prototype has moving parts! Fouling parts or joints that don't work or hinges that disappoint are not something that I will ever present to a client. Sure, gauges and things like that have their place; but this "flip-check" method has worked for hundreds of years: 45 + 45 = 90.
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-05-2013, 04:31 PM
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All of what you have and some extra...
Drafting squares to set or verify tooling square...
I aim for that 0.1 degree and a 1/64" of an inch or less...

after you do this long long it gets to be a routine train of though...
others don't refer to me as analitic for nothing...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-05-2013, 04:33 PM
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I have the usual run of squares, scales, parallels, calipers, surface plates, and mikes, mostly Starrett and Mitutoyo.
But more importantly I study, exploit, and practice metrology. I can and measure & layout to .001" and prove it. So with that G-2 I could make stuff like this, which is made to the nearest .001".
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-05-2013, 06:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quillman View Post
I have the usual run of squares, scales, parallels, calipers, surface plates, and mikes, mostly Starrett and Mitutoyo.
But more importantly I study, exploit, and practice metrology. I can and measure & layout to .001" and prove it. So with that G-2 I could make stuff like this, which is made to the nearest .001".
Pat-

LOL. Since "metrology" was not a word I knew, you inspired me to look up it's meaning.

Metrology is defined by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) as "the science of measurement, embracing both experimental and theoretical determinations at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology.

As it is applied to woodworking- Applied or industrial metrology concerns the application of measurement science to manufacturing and other processes and their use in society, ensuring the suitability of measurement instruments, their calibration and quality control of measurements.

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-06-2013, 01:26 AM
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Squares, straight edges ect.
For an indicating tool to use on woodworking machines, this has perhaps been around for a hundred years. I see nothing that can touch it for so many uses.

It will align table saws and fences, set up a jointer, and many points on more complicated machines like planers.
This is a Starret #57 surface gage, and #196 indicator.
In this photo, the base of the gage has push down pins that are being used in the miter slot of this table saw.


I am looking for the best possible performance out of my machines, resulting in less hand work, and in general better over all consistant quality.

Don

Last edited by Sawdust Don; 01-06-2013 at 01:34 AM.
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 01-06-2013, 07:32 AM
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I live in the 20th century. Every now and then I break out the dial gauge or a digital angle finder but for the most part I use a tri square, carpenter square or simple 45 degree drafting angle. My miter gauge is an Incra and is dead on. The stops in my Unisaw are dead on as are the stops in my miter saw. The3 only tool that gives me trouble is the bandsaw. Not because it is inaccurate but because it is such a pain to set the guides up. Once I have the saw set I can resaw very thin wood. The problem is that once I saw the wood I have to change the blade and start over again with the set up.
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